Self-image

pictures and us

Pictures and us

When chatting with photographer Christof Sage about photography the other day, he showed me some portraits of himself. And he brought me one magazine where his picture was on the cover and said: “…and that`s how he (the photographer who has taken that picture) has seen me.”

I found it interesting that he framed it this way. Our self-image is usually different from how others see us – and different from how we really look. In fact, some scientists have done experiments that show that we tend to think of ourselves as better looking than we are in reality ( https://en.m.wikiversity.org/wiki/Interpersonal_attraction )

Photos and self-image

I know people who run as soon as they see a camera pointed at them. As a teenager when I was very uneasy about how I looked, I used to do the same. My bad – meanwhile I would be glad if I had more pictures of myself from twenty years ago. Now, I think it`s truly nice when somebody bothers to take a picture of me.

I like when people send me photos of myself. Not because I`m so in love with my looks, but because I just find it really interesting. We usually don`t get to see ourselves from other angles than the one our mirror provides. So, I feel like I get to know myself more. And my self-image becomes more complete. And by seeing more and more pictures of myself, I m less surprised about how I look and just get used and comfortable with it.

With a more accurate self-image, I feel freer to BE and don`t need to run. I then can be more open because I don`t have to constantly wonder and worry or even fear how others might see me. Because I know how I look.

Wonderfully made

Most of all, I want to not take myself so overly seriously. So, I`ve got a big nose – well, there certainly are more serious issues than that in this world and as long as it is enabling me to breathe, I don`t want to be ungrateful. There is a Psalm I like that says: “I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well…” It`s true: when I criticize my looks, I kind of feel, that this is such a wrong and ungrateful thing to do. I want to look at my picture saying: Yes that`s me, with a beating heart that is capable to hope, and a mouth that is able to smile bright.

Bilder und wir

Als ich mich neulich mit Fotograf Christof Sage über Fotografie unterhalten habe, zeigte er mir ein paar Portraits von ihm. Er brachte ein Magazin, auf dem sein Portrait auf dem Cover war, mit den Worten: “…und so hat er (der Fotograf, der das Bild gemacht hat) mich gesehen.“

Das fand ich interessant, dass er das so formuliert hat. Unser Selbstbild ist ja normalweise nicht deckungsgleich mit dem Bild, das andere von uns haben – und entspricht auch nicht der Realität. Tatsächlich haben einige Wissenschaftler Experimente gemacht, die zeigen: Wir halten uns in der Regel für besser aussehend, als wir in Wirklichkeit sind (https://en.m.wikiversity.org/wiki/Interpersonal_attraction).

Wenn du weißt, wie du aussiehst, brauchst du nicht wegzurennen

Ich kenne Leute, die sofort wegrennen, wenn sie eine Kamera auf sich gerichtet sehen. Als Teenie, als ich mich noch sehr unwohl damit gefühlt habe, wie ich aussehe, habe ich das auch gemacht. Mein Pech – mittlerweile wäre ich froh, wenn ich mehr Fotos von mir von vor 20 Jahren hätte. Jetzt denke ich, es ist besonders nett, wenn sich jemand die Mühe macht, ein Bild von mir zu machen.

Ich mag es, wenn Leute mir Fotos von mir schicken. Nicht weil ich mich so gutaussehend finde, sondern weil ich es wirklich interessant finde. Wir sehen uns normalerweise nicht aus anderen Winkeln als dem, den unser Spiegel uns bietet. Also habe ich das Gefühl, mich so besser kennenzulernen. Und wenn ich mich öfter mal auf Bildern sehe, bin ich immer weniger überrascht davon, wie ich aussehe und gewöhne mich daran.

Ich muss dann nicht mehr wegrennen. Ich kann offener sein, weil ich mich nicht dauernd frage, wie andere mich sehen könnten. Weil ich ja weiß, wie ich aussehe.

Wunderbar gemacht

Vor allem will ich mich selbst nicht so wichtig nehmen. Dann hab ich eben eine große Nase – es gibt sicherlich wichtigere Probleme auf dieser Welt und solange ich mit ihr atmen kann, will ich nicht undankbar sein. Es gibt einen Psalm, den ich mag: “Ich danke dir dafür, dass ich so sorgfältig und wunderbar gemacht bin. Wunderbar sind deine Werke; meine Seele weiß es.” Das stimmt schon: Wenn ich an meinem Aussehen rummeckere, weiß ich gleichzeitig, dass das so falsch ist. Ich will ein Bild von mir anschauen und sagen: Ja, das bin ich, mit einem schlagenden Herzen, das hoffen kann und einem Mund, der lachen kann.

Christof Sage

magazine press interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

"There`s no such thing as can`t."

In Conversation with Christof Sage

If I was to name all the celebrities that Christof Sage (www.sage-press.de) has photographed it would probably take hours. Bill Clinton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Morgan Freeman, …. even Pope and Queen. And of course all the celebs in his home country Germany – Angela Merkel Thomas Gottschalk, Boris Becker,… Attached to the shoulder straps of his cameras are hundreds of admission wristbands of all the big events that he`s been to as a press photographer. For years Christof Sage was traveling for magazines in order to photograph the most famous people in this world. Now, he has published his own glossy magazine – “Sage”. We met up in his home in Stuttgart-Filderstadt.

Christof, there are so many wanting to be high-profile photographers. Yet, only few make it. Why did you make it to the top?

That has to grow. You start in your twenties by getting into events. After time, people see you more and more often, if you present yourself well in terms of looks and attitude. But that takes years. In the Seventies, I attended the most important events. Then you get booked. In the Eighties, I photographed international celebrities at the set of the famous TV-Show “Wetten, dass…”. I started from the bottom. Things didn`t come easy, I wasn`t left with an inheritance or anything, I have worked very hard and with great diligence to achieve this.

Would you have thought, when you were twenty years old, that you would be photographing people like Bill Clinton one day?

No, I only knew that I wanted to have a house and a Porsche when I`m 60. I advise young people: You need to have a goal in mind. Where do you want to be when you`re 60? You need to divide and plan your life – what do you do between the ages of 20 and 30, 30 and 40? Before starting an apprenticeship, ask yourself: Do you have fun doing what you do? It`s not about money, you need to have love. I really do enjoy working with people. I have been working in a hundred different countries. That`s not that easy to achieve as a photographer. It worked out because I have worked twice as much as others, 17 hours each day. It requires great diligence – but that all comes back to you.

“It`s not about money, you need to have love.”

 

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

Why did you choose people-photography as your thing? I mean you could have as well become, say, for example, a landscape photographer, couldn`t you?

I love humans. The press likes to call me a celebrity photographer, but in fact, I`m a communication photographer, a people photographer – I photograph people. And communication is very important for my job: You have to do a warm-up with people. You can`t just place yourself in front of people`s faces – “Here we go!” But you need to make people loosen up. Only once you managed to do that, you can start taking photos. You should see me photographing abroad: I often don`t understand the language, but I joke, and they understand me at once.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
Press interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

You take pictures of people who don`t necessarily look like models, who need to look as good as possible on photos though – after all, they`re in the public eye. Are you retouching a lot?

I don`t have time for retouching. I`ve got jobs that are demanding 400 portraits in one day – from morning to late in the evening. You`ve got 30 to 60 seconds for each person, you can exchange a few words only. I give directions, make chit-chat, say „Stand like this or like that” – then, boom – photo. That`s a different way of photographing than it`s commonly known. That is fun, but only very few photographers have that skill. That`s what I`m getting booked for. People know: When Sage is in the house, everything runs like clockwork.

Sounds great – but as well like a lot of pressure…

Well, I need to be quick. The camera is pre-set – I don`t have time to configure settings when I`m shooting. The camera has to run in burst mode. The photographer Helmut Newton once asked me at an event: “Why do you use flash? You don`t need to – look, I photograph using only ambient light.” But he was no contract photographer. He was there for fun, not to deliver contract work. My work is about being fast. When I`m at a horse race I have to photograph 200 couples, approach everyone, observe who belongs to whom, when is which person at which table. Then you need to act fast, everything has to be done chop chop. That`s a completely different way of working. I do enjoy photographing these kinds of events – I`m in full action and completely in my element.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

Do you have a career highlight, maybe a photograph, that you love the most?

I don`t have that. Every photo is important to me. I have attended great events and am very grateful for that. If I set myself a goal I make it happen. There`s no such thing as can`t. Sometimes it needs three or four attempts. It has taken me years to get to know the right people to get accreditation for events like the Golden Globes. But that`s what makes it exciting. If you really want to achieve something, then you will succeed. But you won`t if you just try half-heartedly – then you`ll never make it. One has to be born to work independently, it`s not everybody’s cup of tea.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

“If you really want to achieve something, then you will succeed. But you won`t if you just try half-heartedly – then you`ll never make it.”

Your career started with film photography. How did you perceive the switch to digital?

Digital cameras have changed my work for the better. First, we refused to make the change, but only half a year in we bought the first digital camera for about 16000 Euro. You can now take better pictures with a smartphone than with that camera. When on delegation trips with the former chancellor Helmut Kohl and fellow politician Erwin Teufel the German press agency dpa wanted photos of every day. I had to transport camera films accompanied by escort vehicles. And while doing that I was missing on site. With digital everything was so much quicker and less complicated.

That`s quite a sign of trust that people like the former chancellor would take you on their state visits...

It`s been written about me: „Discretion is his life insurance“. When traveling with famous people you hear and see a lot of confidential things. Until this day I have been keeping my word of honor. Whatever private matters I would see or hear, I would never make them public. Only few are able to keep that word – there are people selling secrets and photos that aren`t meant for the public eye for 50 Euro.

And now there`s another milestone in your career: You`ve just published your very own magazine “Sage”!

You need to come up with new things all the time. Ask yourself: Where are my strengths? And then work on them further. Have new ideas. Where can I place my work on the market? Because of COVID, all events are being canceled for more than a year now, everything takes place online, so press photographers have nothing to photograph. Therefore I thought: If I can`t photograph, I have other people photograph for me and publish my own magazine “Sage”. Just lounging around or tidying my office all day isn`t for me. The magazine is a success – almost all copies have sold and I have to print more now.

magazine press interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

"Geht nicht gibt`s nicht."

Im Gespräch mit Christof Sage

Wollte ich alle Stars und Sternchen aufzählen, die Christof Sage (www.sage-press.de) schon fotografiert hat, säße ich vermutlich noch in zwei Stunden an dieser Aufzählung. Bill Clinton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Morgan Freeman, …- sogar Papst und Queen. Und natürlich sämtliche Bekanntheiten aus Deutschland – Angela Merkel, Thomas Gottschalk, Boris Becker, und und und. An den Schultergurten seiner Kameras hängen hunderte von Eintrittsbändchen von all den großen Veranstaltungen, die er als Pressefotograf besucht hat. Jahrelang war er für Magazine unterwegs, um die berühmtesten Menschen dieser Welt abzulichten. Jetzt hat er sein eigenes Hochglanzmagazin herausgebracht – „Sage“. Wir haben uns in seinem Zuhause in Filderstadt getroffen.

Mensch, Christof, es gibt so viele, die Top-Fotograf werden möchten. Nur die Allerwenigsten schaffen es – warum hast du`s geschafft?

Sowas muss wachsen. Du fängst mit zwanzigmal an, in Veranstaltungen reinzukommen. Irgendwann sehen dich die Leute immer öfter, wenn du dich optisch und menschlich gut verkaufst. Das dauert aber Jahre. In den 70er Jahren war ich bei den wichtigsten Events dabei. Dann wirst du gebucht. In den 80er Jahren habe ich bei der Fernsehshow „Wetten, dass…“ Weltstars fotografiert. Ich habe bei null angefangen. Mir wurde nichts geschenkt, ich habe nichts geerbt, habe mir alles selbst hart erarbeitet – mit sehr viel Fleiß.

Hättest du mit zwanzig gedacht, dass du mal Leute wie Bill Clinton fotografierst?

Nein, ich wusste nur, dass ich mit sechzig ein Haus und einen Porsche möchte. Ich rate jungen Menschen immer: Ihr braucht ein Ziel vor Augen: Wo wollt ihr mit 60 sein? Ihr müsst euch das Leben einteilen – was macht ihr von 20 bis 30, von 30 bis 40? Bevor ihr eine Ausbildung beginnt, überlegt euch: Habe ich eigentlich Spaß an dem was ich mache? Es geht nicht ums Geld, du brauchst Liebe dafür. Mir macht es Freude, mit Menschen zu arbeiten. Ich habe in hundert Ländern auf der Erde gearbeitet. Das musst du als Fotograf erstmal schaffen. Das hat funktioniert, weil ich doppelt so viel gearbeitet habe, als die anderen, jeden Tag 17 Stunden. Du musst sehr viel Fleiß aufbringen – aber das kommt dann alles zurück.

“Es geht nicht um`s Geld. Du brauchst Liebe dafür.”

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

Warum hast du dir People-Fotografie als Spezialität ausgesucht? Du hättest ja auch sagen wir mal Landschaftsfotografie machen können?

Ich liebe die Menschen. Die Presse betitelt mich gerne als Promi- oder Star-Fotograf, aber eigentlich bin ich Kommunikationsfotograf, People-Fotograf – ich fotografiere Menschen. Und Kommunikation ist dabei wichtig: Du muss mit den Leuten erstmal ein Warm-up machen. Du kannst dich nicht einfach hinstellen – „so jetzt geht`s los“. Sondern, du musst die Leute auflockern. Erst wenn du das geschafft hast, kann`s losgehen. Du solltest mich mal sehen, wenn ich im Ausland fotografiere: Ich verstehe die Sprache oft nicht, mache einen Witz daraus und die anderen verstehen mich sofort.

Du fotografierst ja Menschen, die nicht unbedingt wie Models aussehen, aber auf Fotos möglichst gut aussehen müssen – schließlich stehen sie in der Öffentlichkeit. Bist du da viel am Retuschieren?

Zeit für Retuschieren habe ich nicht. Ich habe Aufträge, da mache ich 400 Portraits an einem Tag – von morgens bis abends. Da hast du für jeden 30 bis 60 Sekunden, zwei Sätze. Ich führe Regie, halte kurz Small-Talk, sage schon mal „Steh so oder so“ – dann, zack – Foto. Das ist eine andere Art zu fotografieren, als man es für gewöhnlich kennt. Das macht Spaß, aber das können wirklich nur wenige Fotografen. Dafür werde ich gebucht – die Leute wissen: wenn Sage da ist, läuft`s.

Klingt super – aber ja, auch nach Druck...

Bei mir muss es schnell gehen. Die Kamera ist voreingestellt – ich habe keine Zeit, noch Sachen einzustellen. Der Motor muss laufen. Der Fotograf Helmut Newton fragte mich mal auf einer Veranstaltung: „Warum verwendest du Blitz? Das brauchst du doch nicht – schau, ich fotografiere mit dem Licht, das da ist“. Aber er ist kein Auftragsfotograf. Er war da zum Vergnügen, nicht um Auftragsarbeit abzuliefern. Bei mir geht es um Schnelligkeit. Bei einem Pferderennen muss ich 200 Paare durchfotografieren, muss auf jeden zugehen, muss beobachten, wer gehört zu wem, wann ist wer an welchem Tisch. Da musst du schnell handeln, alles muss zack-zack gehen, das ist eine ganz andere Arbeit. Ich muss volle Leistung bringen. Und nach zwei Stunden ist es vorbei. Solche Events machen mir Spaß – da bin ich in Action, ganz in meinem Element.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
press interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

Hast du ein Karriere-Highlight, ein Foto, über das du dich besonders freust?

Sowas habe ich nicht. Für mich ist jedes Foto wichtig. Ich habe tolle Veranstaltungen mitgemacht und bin dafür sehr dankbar. Wenn ich mir Ziele setzte, verwirkliche ich sie. Geht nicht gibt`s nicht.  Manchmal braucht es drei oder vier Anläufe. Es hat Jahre gedauert, um die richtigen Leute kennenzulernen, um Akkreditierungen für Veranstaltungen wie die Golden Globes zu bekommen. Aber darin liegt der Reiz. Wenn man etwas wirklich erreichen will, dann erreicht man es auch. Aber nicht, wenn man etwas halbherzig macht – dann schafft man`s nie. Für das selbständige Arbeiten muss man geboren sein, das liegt nicht jedem.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

“Wenn man etwas wirklich erreichen will, dann erreicht man es auch. Aber nicht, wenn man etwas halbherzig macht – dann schafft man`s nie.”

Du hast deine Karriere ja noch mit Film begonnen. Wie hast du den Wechsel zur Digitalfotografie erlebt?

Digitalkameras haben meine Arbeit zum Positiven verändert. Erst wollten wir den Wechsel nicht mitmachen, aber schon nach einem halben Jahr haben wir unsere erste digitale Kamera für 16 000 Euro gekauft. Da machst du heute mit dem Handy bessere Bilder, als damit. Bei den Delegationsreisen mit Helmut Kohl und Erwin Teufel wollte die dpa jeden Tag Fotos. Ich musste oft Filme mit Eskorte-Fahrzeugen transportieren – und habe in der Zeit dann vor Ort gefehlt. Digital geht alles viel schneller und unkomplizierter.  

Das ist ein ganz schön großer Vertrauensbeweis, wenn dich Leute wie der ehemalige Bundeskanzler zu Reisen mitnehmen...

Über mich wurde geschrieben: „Diskretion ist seine Lebensversicherung“. Wenn du mit bekannten Menschen unterwegs bist, hörst und siehst du viel Vertrauliches. Bis zum heutigen Tag gilt mein Ehrenwort. Egal welche vertraulichen Sachen ich höre oder sehe, ich würde damit nie an die Öffentlichkeit gehen. Das können die Wenigsten – es gibt ja Leute, die für 50 Euro Geheimnisse verraten oder Bilder verkaufen, die nicht für die Öffentlichkeit bestimmt sind.

Und jetzt gibt`s einen neuen Meilenstein in deiner Karriere: du hast dein eigenes Magazin „Sage“ herausgebracht!

Du musst dir immer neue Sachen einfallen lassen. Dich immer fragen: wo liegen meine Stärken? Und die ausarbeiten. Neue Ideen haben. Wo kann ich meine Art von Arbeit an den Mann bringen? Bei uns Presse-Fotografen sind wegen Corona seit einem Jahr alle Events abgesagt, alles nur noch online, nichts mehr zu fotografieren. Daher habe ich mir gedacht: wenn ich nicht fotografieren kann, lasse ich fotografieren und gebe mein eigenes Magazin „Sage“ heraus. Die ganze Zeit herumliegen und Büro aufräumen, das ist nichts für mich. Das Magazin ist ein Erfolg – fast alle Exemplare sind verkauft und ich muss bereits nachdrucken.

Magazine press interview

Daniela Reske

photographer Daniela Reske

„You mustn`t be a perfectionist when doing documentaries“

„You mustn`t be a perfectionist when doing documentary“

photographer Daniela Reske

In Conversation with Daniela Reske

Finally, I start what I`ve had in my mind for a while now: Every now and then I want to interview creatives whose work I find inspiring – photographers, fashion designers and other artists. We can learn so much from each other! Generally, I want to get into the habit of asking questions and most importantly of truly listening. My first interview for this blog is with one of my very favourite photographers, Daniela Reske. She has her studio in Reutlingen-Oferdingen/Germany, and documents weddings internationally. Her pictures are like cinema – one-of-a-kind storyworlds filled with feeling and special moments. We met in her studio, a former boathouse by a river with huge old windows and a cozy fireplace.

Daniela, when I look at your work, I feel like in a movie that I want to keep on watching. How did you get to your unique visual language?

I have always been intrigued by journalism, by pictures that are conveying the moment. When I started out as a photographer twelve years ago, the reportage approach in weddings wasn`t mainstream yet. It was offered by only a few photographers. In the US this approach of documenting the entire day had been common for some time though. Today, wedding documentaries are pretty much standard. I loved the idea of having a photo album that enables people to relive that special day. When are friends and family ever all together? To me it`s important to show what`s happening in a genuine way, to truly document.

How do you put that into practice?

I use a 35 mm prime lens. That makes my pictures look very cinematic. Instead of the typical portrait, I rather capture scenes. I have looked at photographs that I liked and analyzed them: How are things done technically? What do I need to master as a photographer? How do I need to act in order to enable these scenes and moments to unfold in front of me? I must not attract attention. Which challenges the use of a 35 mm lens. So, I have to be even more unobtrusive. This technique is a big part of my work. I don`t use zoom lenses, but I walk instead. And I know how I need to move.

“To me it`s important to show what`s happening in a genuine way, to truly document.”

photographer Daniela Reske

Don`t you find that oftentimes people are immediately alarmed when they feel a camera pointed at them, either looking straight into the camera or turning away?

Often you can catch a funny moment when a person looks straight into the camera in just that moment when you want to press the shutter. When there`s a lot of interaction it`s easier for me. The more hustle and bustle the better. But I generally act very unobtrusive and am hardly noticed. However, at weddings, people are dressed up and want to be photographed. Because of its defined context, a wedding is an opportunity for many good photos – it certainly is different from going into town to take pictures.

What makes a good picture for you?

If it tells a story and if it`s touching – moving in any way and be it in a negative way. Of course, I`m pleased if the composition and light are right, too. But not the perfect picture is the good one. A trivial subject matter that`s captured with perfection often contains no emotion. A good picture is the one that conveys feeling and communicates the moment.

So you can overlook flaws, for example when something is out of focus what really should be in focus?

If a potentially good picture is so blurred that I can`t use it, that of course annoys me. As I work a lot with my aperture wide open, it happens often, that something isn`t quite perfectly in focus. I can handle that. I think of the movies, where the focus is moved to the ear for the skin to look smoother. You must not be a perfectionist when doing documentaries, otherwise, you`ll end up unhappy. A picture has to communicate a strong story and strike a chord with the viewer. Everything else is a minor matter. That`s what I like about reportage.

photographer Daniela Reske
Photographer Daniela Reske

Do you sometimes have nightmares about missing important moments at a photo event?

The evidently important moments, like the kiss after the wedding ceremony, are certainly must-haves. When it comes to these moments, I take no risks, but I don`t expect any artistic masterpieces either. The truly brilliant pictures are captured in other situations. You cannot be everywhere at the same time, you can`t get everything, because so much is happening simultaneously. I am alert and focused and I pay close attention to what`s going on around me. At a wedding, I`m with the couple already in the morning, when they prepare for the day. I then notice which people are most important to them, who have a special relationship with them. Those, I want to capture often. I don`t search for moments, but I keep my eyes and my mind wide open.

During conventional photo shoots, narrative moments don`t necessarily happen just like that. Nevertheless, you manage to maintain your expressive imagery…

Generally, I try to keep photoshoots as natural as possible. I don`t have a plan of how the people are supposed to look in the photos. I always try to find out, what they are here for, and what attracted them to my images. In my photos, I try to reveal relationships. I don`t dictate poses. I set the context in order to allow the happenings to unfold freely. It`s very important that I show up easy-going, confident, and relaxed. So that the people in front of the camera can let go. If I`m insecure the shooting is not going to succeed. Confidence comes with practice though.

After twelve years working as a photographer you probably have a lot of that – say, how did you get into photography at all?

At school, we built a Camera Obscura, a pinhole camera. I was completely in awe. I have always been a visual person. When I had my daughter, I started to photograph her. A friend asked me to photograph her wedding. That`s how I got to my first portfolio images. Before I had been working in marketing and I was very media-savvy. That helped me to become visible and prominent as a self-employed creative.

Photographer Daniela Reske

“In my photos, I try to reveal relationships.”

What have your biggest challenges as a photographer been?

I find it difficult when people have a fixed image of how they want to come across. This is especially common in the business sector. I then feel like I have to put them in a costume, which I can`t. A challenge for every photographer is peoples` harsh self-criticism. Sometimes, while I`m photographing someone, that person points out that certain flaws can be retouched later. That`s when I start to communicate that I`m not here to make them slimmer. Of course, I picture everyone in an appealing, aesthetically pleasing way. If people aren`t at peace with themselves, I can`t do anything about that as a photographer though. I see the opposite, too: Last year, I had beautiful shootings with women, who told me that they wanted to be photographed because they feel they`re now at peace with themselves.

You were the co-author of a book and you initiated workshops – are there any new projects on the horizon?

When the situation allows it, I will certainly offer workshops again. Together with a friend and colleague, I have opened an online shop where we sell prints. And I`m sure we`ll do some exhibitions again.

„Du darfst bei Reportagen nicht perfektionistisch sein“

„Du darfst bei Reportagen nicht perfektionistisch sein“

photographer Daniela Reske

Im Gespräch mit Daniela Reske

Endlich beginne ich, was ich schon lange vorhatte: Eine lose Interviewserie mit Kreativen, deren Arbeit ich beeindruckend finde – Fotografen, Modedesigner und andere Künstler. Es gibt so viel zu lernen! Generell möchte ich mir angewöhnen, viele Fragen zu stellen und vor allem gut zuzuhören. Mein erstes Interview ist mit einer meiner Lieblingsfotografinnen: Daniela Reske. Sie hat ihr Atelier in Reutlingen-Oferdingen, reist aber auch schon mal ins Ausland, um Hochzeiten zu dokumentieren. Ihre Bilder sind wie Kino – einzigartige Erzählwelten, voller Gefühl und besonderer Augenblicke. Wir haben uns in ihrem Atelier getroffen, einem ehemaligen Bootshaus am Fluss mit riesigen alten Fenstern und gemütlichem Kaminfeuer.

Daniela, wenn ich mir deine Arbeiten anschaue, komme ich mir vor wie in einem Film, den man immer weiter schauen möchte. Wie bist du zu deiner besonderen Bildsprache gekommen?

Mich hat schon immer das Journalistische interessiert – Bilder, die im Moment passieren. Als ich vor zwölf Jahren als Fotografin begonnen habe, war die Hochzeitsreportage noch nicht so etabliert. Es gab nur eine Handvoll Fotografen, die das gemacht haben. In den USA gab es die Bewegung schon länger, dass der ganze Tag begleitet und dokumentiert wird. Heute ist die Reportage im Hochzeitsbereich ja fast Standard. Ich fand die Idee schön, dass das es am Ende ein Album gibt, mit dem man diesen besonderen Tag nacherleben kann. Wann sind Freunde und Familie schon mal alle zusammen? Wichtig ist mir, das Geschehen so festzuhalten, wie es tatsächlich passiert ist – also wirkliche Reportage-Arbeit.

Wie setzt du das praktisch um?

Ich fotografiere mit 35 mm Festbrennweite. Dadurch wirken die Bilder sehr filmisch. Statt klassischen Portraits, fange ich eher Szenen ein. Ich habe mir Sachen angeschaut, die mir gefallen haben und habe mir dann überlegt: Wie ist das technisch gelöst? Was muss ich als Fotografin können? Wie muss ich mich verhalten, damit diese Szenen und Momente vor mir geschehen können? Ich muss unauffällig sein. Das steht eigentlich im Widerspruch zu den 35 mm, also erfordert es noch mehr Zurückhaltung von mir. Die Technik ist ein großer Teil meiner Arbeit. Ich zoome nicht, sondern laufe. Und ich weiß, wie ich mich bewegen muss.

“Wichtig ist mir, das Geschehen so festzuhalten, wie es tatsächlich passiert ist – also wirkliche Reportage-Arbeit.”

photographer Daniela Reske

Geht es dir nicht oft so, dass Leute sofort verschreckt her – oder weg – schauen, sobald eine Kamera auf sie gerichtet wird?

Oft erwischt man einen witzigen Moment, wenn eine Person gerade in die Kamera schaut. Wenn viel Miteinander stattfindet, ist es einfacher für mich. Je trubeliger, desto besser. Aber ich verhalte mich eben sehr zurückhaltend und werde dann fast nicht mehr wahrgenommen. Auf Hochzeiten ist es außerdem so, dass sich alle schön zurechtgemacht haben. Die Leute wollen dann auch fotografiert werden. Durch den definierten Rahmen ermöglicht eine Hochzeit immer viele gute Bilder – anders als würde man einfach in die Stadt gehen und fotografieren.

Was macht für dich ein gutes Bild aus?

Wenn es eine Geschichte erzählt und berührt – auf irgendeine Art und Weise, das kann auch negativ sein. Natürlich freut es mich, wenn dazu noch Komposition und Licht stimmen. Aber nicht das perfekte Bild ist das Gute, sondern das emotionale Bild, das den Moment rüberbringt. Ein gewöhnliches Motiv, bei dem alles perfektioniert ist, hat dagegen oft keine Emotion.

Dann kannst du also gut darüber hinwegsehen, wenn zum Beispiel mal was nicht ganz scharf ist, was eigentlich im Fokus sein sollte?

Wenn ein potentiell gutes Bild unbrauchbar unscharf ist, ärgert es mich natürlich. Ich arbeite viel offenblendig, da passiert es schnell, dass der Fokus nicht perfekt ist. Damit kann ich gut umgehen. Ich denke da an den Film, bei dem absichtlich der Fokus aufs Ohr gelegt wird, damit die Haut schöner wirkt. Du darfst bei Reportagen nicht perfektionistisch sein, sonst wirst du unglücklich. Ein Bild soll starke Geschichten erzählen und emotional berühren, das andere ist Nebensache. Gerade das mag ich an der Reportage.

photographer Daniela Reske

Hast du manchmal Alpträume, wichtige Momente eines Fotoevents zu verpassen?

Die vordergründig wichtigen Momente, wie der Kuss nach der Trauung, sind natürlich Must-Haves. Da gehe ich einfach auf Sicherheit und erwarte keine großen Kunstwerke. Die wirklich guten Bilder mache ich an anderen Stellen. Du kannst nicht immer überall sein, kannst nicht alles erwischen, denn es geschieht ja so viel gleichzeitig. Ich bin aufmerksam und fokussiert und achte darauf, was um mich herum passiert. Weil ich schon morgens bei den Vorbereitungen dabei bin, bekomme ich mit, wer die wichtigen Menschen im Umfeld des Paares sind, wer einen besonderen Bezug hat. Da schaue ich, dass die oft festgehalten sind. Ich suche die Momente nicht, sondern ich halte Augen und Geist offen.

Bei klassischen Fotoshootings kommen erzählende Momente nicht unbedingt von selbst. Trotzdem schaffst du es auch da, deine ausdrucksstarke Bildsprache beizubehalten...

Auch Fotoshootings versuche ich so natürlich wie möglich zu halten. Ich habe keinen Plan im Kopf, wie die Menschen auf den Bildern aussehen sollen. Ich versuche immer herauszufinden, warum sie hier sind, was sie an meinen Fotos angezogen hat. Auf den Bildern versuche ich, Beziehungen zu zeigen und gebe keine Posen vor. Ich konstruiere den Rahmen, um dann möglichst viel dem Geschehen selbst zu überlassen. Wichtig ist, dass ich als Fotografin Coolness, Selbstverständlichkeit und Entspanntheit mitbringe, damit die Menschen vor der Kamera loslassen können. Wenn ich unsicher bin, wird das Shooting nichts. Sicherheit kommt aber mit Übung.

Davon hast du nach zwölf Jahren als Fotografin bestimmt viel - sag mal, wie bist du eigentlich überhaupt zur Fotografie gekommen?

In der Schule haben wir eine Kamera Obscura gebaut, das hat mich total begeistert. Ich war immer ein visueller Mensch. Als meine Tochter da war, habe ich angefangen, sie zu fotografieren. Eine Freundin hat mich gefragt, ob ich ihre Hochzeit fotografiere und so hatte ich meine ersten Bilder. Vorher habe ich im Marketing gearbeitet und ich war sehr medienaffin. Das hat mir als selbständige Kreative geholfen, sichtbar zu werden.

photographer Daniela Reske

“Auf meinen Bildern versuche ich, Beziehungen zu zeigen.”

Was waren oder sind deine größten Herausforderungen als Fotografin?

Schwierig wird es, wenn Menschen eine zu konkrete Vorstellung davon haben, wie sie wirken möchten. Das kommt vor allem im Business-Bereich vor. Ich habe dann das Gefühl, ich muss ihnen ein Kostüm anziehen, was ich ja gar nicht kann. Eine Herausforderung für jeden Fotografen ist, dass Menschen oft sehr selbstkritisch sind. Manche weisen schon während des Shootings darauf hin, dass man ja retuschieren könne. Da fange ich bereits an, zu vermitteln, dass ich als Fotograf nicht dazu da bin, sie schlanker zu machen. Natürlich fotografiere ich jeden schön und ästhetisch ansprechend. Wenn Menschen mit sich selbst nicht im Reinen sind, dann kann ich da als Fotograf nichts machen. Ich erlebe auch das Gegenteil: Letztes Jahr hatte ich sehr schöne Shootings mit Frauen, die sagten, sie wollen intimere Fotos von sich, weil sie jetzt mit sich im Reinen sind.

Du hast ja bereits an einem Buch mitgeschrieben, hast Workshops initiiert – gibt`s gerade neue Projekte bei dir?

Wenn es die Situation zulässt, werde ich in Zukunft sicher wieder Workshops anbieten. Mit einem Freund und Kollegen habe ich letztes Jahr einen Onlineshop eröffnet, über den wir Prints verkaufen. Und wir werden bestimmt auch wieder Ausstellungen machen.

photographer Daniela Reske
photographer Daniela Reske

Seeing fresh

photography book joy in seeing fresh

The joy in seeing

The other week I`ve written a guest blogpost: A review on a book by Hiltrud Enders called (translated) “Joy in seeing”. To read the review in German click here on fotografr.de

The book is about attentive seeing, about engaging with what is there right now in order to capture that. We see; we snap. And by snapping I don`t mean rush, because, in fact, we need to be calm and rush would blur our vision. But what I mean by snapping is: We don`t hesitate or think. We go by impulse and intuition. We don`t get uneasy thinking “How do I get a good picture?”. The author says: “Be without expectation, let it be a surprise.”

Awe-inspired snapping

The concept is to capture the moment of “seeing fresh”. Hiltrud Enders describes this moment as the “freshness of the first few milliseconds in which you neither classify nor describe”. Basically, when it`s still reflex and instinct only. When it`s still that initial “wow” with no further thoughts or categorizing. “You cannot see and think at the same time”.

The essence of this approach is to cast out the labelling or commenting. It doesn`t mean mindless snapping but awe-inspired snapping. The longer we can stay in that state of awe without thinking or judgement (I guess it takes practice, I certainly need to practise more) the longer we can truly enjoy what we see.

joy in seeing fresh

Open your eyes again

As soon as we start thinking, the fresh, clear moment of seeing is gone. Typical thoughts of mine are: “This could make a good photo” (labeling what I see as good or bad). Or: “The background here is not great” (wanting to change something). Or – my most common hindering thought: “What will people think if they see me taking a picture now?” Hiltrud Enders says: “As soon as I notice that I start to think, I close my eyes, open them again and have a new, fresh look.” And: “When I`m free from the outer acknowledgment and my own expectation, then I live and experience more.”

Lean in - whatever happens

We can practice that right where we`re at. Wherever we see something that makes us stop thinking for a second, because of the “aww wow” that just entered our mind. “Everything is worthy to be looked at – whether at the petrol station or in the botanical garden. Seeing happens all the time“, says Hiltrud Enders. „If I cannot see in my familiar surroundings, then I can`t see in outside of this world either.”

Thus, the idea is not to wait for a holiday, or later, but to pay attention to what we see right now. In our pyjamas, on the way to our business meeting, at the grocery store, on our dinner date, in our everyday. Whether we`re in a good mood or in a grumpy mood. Whether we have a promotion to celebrate or whether we just got fired. No labeling, just seeing. „Lean in- whatever happens.“

Freude am Sehen

Neulich habe ich einen Gastblogbeitrag geschrieben: eine Rezension über das Buch “Freude am Sehen” von Hiltrud Enders. Um die Rezension zu lesen, klick hier auf fotografr.de .

Das Buch handelt vom aufmerksamen Sehen. Von der “Beschäftigung mit dem, was gerade ist”, um das aufzunehmen. Wir sehen, wir schießen ein Foto. Und damit meine ich nicht Eile, den tatsächlich müssen wir ruhig sein und in Eile würden wir nicht klar sehen. Gemeint ist: Nicht zögern oder denken. Dem Impuls und der Intuition folgen. Also zum Beispiel nicht unruhig werden und denken: “Wie kriege ich ein gutes Foto?”. Die Autorin sagt: “Sei ohne Erwartungen, lass dich überraschen.“

Ins "Wow" knipsen

Das Konzept ist, den Moment des “frischen Sehens” festzuhalten. Hiltrud Enders beschreibt diesen Moment als die „die Frische der ersten Millisekunde der Wahrnehmung, in der noch keine Einordnung und Beschreibung geschieht“. Also solange du immer noch ganz im Reflex und Instinkt bist. Solange du nur voller “Wow-Gefühl” bist, ohne weitere Gedanken oder Einordnung. „Du kannst nicht Sehen und Denken gleichzeitig.”

Es geht darum, nicht zu bewerten oder kommentieren. Das heißt aber nicht, einfach ziellos zu knipsen, sondern aus dem „Wow-Gefühl“ heraus zu knipsen. Je länger wir in diesem Gefühl ohne Denken und Bewerten bleiben können (ich denke es braucht Übung, ich brauche auf jeden Fall noch mehr Übung) desto länger können wir beim Sehen genießen.

joy in seeing fresh book

Öffne deine Augen neu

Sobald wir beginnen zu denken, ist der frische, klare Moment des Sehens weg. Typischerweise denke ich: “Das könnte ein gutes Foto geben“ (bewerte das, was ich sehe, als gut oder schlecht). Oder: “Der Hintergrund ist ungeeignet” (will etwas ändern). Oder mein hinderlichster Gedanke: “Was könnten Leute denken, wenn sie sehen, dass ich jetzt ein Foto mache?“ Hiltrud Enders sagt: “Sobald ich bemerke, dass ich ins Denken versinke, kann ich die Augen schließen, wieder öffnen und neu hinschauen.“ Und: “Bin ich frei von fremder Anerkennung und eigener Erwartung, so kann ich mehr erleben.“

Lehn dich rein - was immer passiert

Wir können das genau da wo wir gerade sind üben. Wo immer wir etwas sehen, bei dem wir wegen des „oh wow“-Effekts das Denken vergessen. „Alles ist wert, betrachtet zu werden – ob an der Tankstelle oder im botanischen Garten. Sehen geschieht ständig“, schreibt Hiltrud Enders. „Wenn ich nicht in meiner vertrauten Umgebung sehen kann, dann auch nicht außerhalb dieser Welt.“

Die Idee ist also, nicht auf die Ferien zu warten, oder später. Sondern jetzt gleich auf das zu achten, was wir sehen. In unserem Schlafanzug, auf dem Weg zu unserem Geschäfts-Meeting, im Gemüseladen, bei unserer Verabredung. Ob wir eine Beförderung zu feiern haben, oder ob wir gerade gefeuert worden sind. Nicht bewerten, nur sehen. “Lehn dich rein – was immer geschieht.”

photography book joy in seeing fresh

Creative work

creative work leica analog photo camera

Creative Work

How to get creative work done

One of the biggest traps for creative work is postponing. Either because of “waiting for inspiration”. Or because of perfectionism, saying “I`m not good enough yet, conditions are not ideal at the moment,…”

I`ve written about this before but it`s been one of the most important lessons for me: Creativity means commitment which implies planning your day, setting priorities, and setting aside time for them. Creative work means fight and determination. And actually doing the work now.

“Inspiration is for amateurs. The rest of us just show up and get to work”, said photographer Chuck Close. “If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself.”

No need for the perfect setting

The other day, I had an interesting interview with singer and musician Joe Vox. He has released an album together with other musicians called “COVid IDentities”. Because of the lockdown, one of the musicians didn`t have access to fancy recording technology. So he just used his phone. Simple as that.

The musicians made things work, even though conditions weren`t ideal. Joe Vox said: “As a creative, you don`t need the perfect setting. On the contrary: Too much perfection can indeed harm because you constantly find that settings aren`t ideal. And you end up doing nothing at all because of that. You can always do something when you are creative and really want to.”

Kreative Arbeit

Eine der größten Fallen für kreative Arbeit ist Aufschieberitis. Entweder weil man auf “Inspiration” wartet. Oder wegen Perfektionismus, der einem sagt “Ich bin noch nicht gut genug, die Bedingungen sind im Moment noch nicht ideal,…“

Ich habe schon mal über dieses Thema geschrieben, aber es ist eine der wichtigsten Lektionen für mich gewesen: Kreativität bedeutet Einsatz und sich zu verpflichten, Prioritäten zu setzen und dafür Zeit zu reservieren. Also den Tag entsprechend drum herum zu planen. Es bedeutet auch zu kämpfen und entschlossen zu sein. Und sich tatsächlich jetzt an die Arbeit zu machen.

„Inspiration ist was für Amateure. Wir anderen lassen uns blicken und machen uns an die Arbeit“, sagte Fotograf Chuck Close. „Wenn du darauf wartest, dass sich die Wolken auftun und dich ein Geistesblitz trifft, dann wirst du nicht besonders viel zustande bringen. All die besten Ideen kommen aus dem Prozess heraus. Sie entstehen bei der Arbeit selbst.”

Es braucht nicht die perfekten Bedingungen

Neulich hatte ich ein interessantes Interview mit Sänger und Musiker Joe Vox. Er hat ein Album “COVid Identities” mit anderen Musikern zusammen herausgebracht. Wegen des Lockdowns hatte einer der Musiker keinen Zugang zu richtiger Aufnahmetechnik. Also hat er sein Handy benutzt. Ganz einfach.

Die Musiker haben die CD möglich gemacht, auch wenn nicht alles ideal war.  Joe Vox sagte: “ Als Kreativer braucht man nicht die perfekten Bedingungen. Im Gegenteil: Zu viel Perfektion tut oft nicht gut, denn man findet dauernd, dass die Umstände nicht gut genug sind. Und am Ende kommt gar nichts bei raus. Man kann immer was machen, wenn man Kreativität hat und wirklich will.“

Light and Style

X Fashion and Lifestyle Photography Portfolio Nadine Wilmanns

How to use light for mood and style

It`s not the subject that makes a photograph, it`s the light. It was only when I understood this very basic idea, that my everyday photography has gotten so much richer and more interesting, too.

I`ve written a guest blog post about this on the beautiful photography blog of Sheen Watkins Aperture and Light. To read the full article click on the following link:

https://www.apertureandlight.com/2021/01/how-to-use-light-to-create-mood-and-style/

Hier ist die deutsche Übersetzung:

Licht für Gefühl im Bild und deinen Stil

Als ich mit Fotografieren anfing, dachte ich, das Motiv macht ein Foto aus. In einer „hässlichen“ Umgebung zum Beispiel, dachte ich: Hier kann`s kein gutes Bild geben. Gleichzeitig habe ich meiner Fotografie oft das „besondere Etwas“ vermisst.

Erst als mir etwas ganz Einfaches, aber so Wirkungsvolles, klar wurde, wurde meine Fotografie viel besser: Nicht das Motiv ist wichtig, sondern das Licht. Das Motiv kann so wenig einladend wie eine Mülltüte oder eine alte Küchentür sein. Wenn`s da gutes Licht gibt, dann kann da auch ein Bild sein. Also habe ich meine Aufmerksamkeit weniger auf Dinge und mehr auf Licht gelenkt.

Bald ist mir überall aufgefallen, wie da gerade das Licht ist. Und seitdem ist meine Alltags-Fotografie viel interessanter geworden. Was so hilfreich ist, gerade jetzt in Zeiten des Lockdowns. Sowas wie ein Stapel Notizbücher kann fast schon poetisch aussehen, wenn interessantes Licht drauf fällt.

light photography light spot on pile of notebooks
light on rose petal

Wie du mit Licht umgehst, definiert deinen Stil

Licht und deine eigene Art es für dich zu nutzen, ist ein guter Startpunkt, um deinen eigenen Stil zu entwickeln. Ich bin persönlich eher im dunkleren Bereich. Das heißt, mir macht es nichts aus, das Bild ordentlich unterzubelichten. Damit ich meine Highlights, also die hellen Stellen im Bild, genau richtig für mich werden. Ich finde, das schafft Gefühl und Atmosphäre – und oft Drama. Aber das ist Geschmacksache.

Wer weiß, in ein paar Jahren mag ich vielleicht einen helleren, luftigeren Stil lieber. Wir müssen nur wissen, wie wir das Licht für uns nutzen können. Wie wir unsere Belichtung anpassen können und was für Licht wir brauchen, um das zu bekommen, was wir persönlich mögen. Dann ist dein Stil nicht etwas, das zufällig oder ab und zu passiert, sondern absichtlich. Und dann kannst du auch absichtlich anders fotografieren, falls du das mal willst.

Absichtlich unterbelichten

Bei natürlichem Licht ohne Blitz verwende ich normalerweise Spot Metering, nehme das Licht, die hellen Stellen, als Maß für meine Belichtung und lasse die Schatten machen was sie wollen. Wenn viel Kontrast im Bild ist, also wenn es viele Schatten hat, ist das Bild insgesamt oft großflächig unterbelichtet. Manchmal hat das einen hilfreichen Nebeneffekt: Es räumt dein Foto auf. Das Durcheinander wird einfach schwarz und das Auge wird direkt zu der richtig belichteten Stelle gelenkt.

Planting the ordinary

Weil ich diese Art zu belichten mag, halte ich automatisch nach kontrastreichem Licht Ausschau, nach Schatten und hellen Stellen. Wenn ich eher Lust auf „luftige“ Bilder habe, dann schaue ich nach eher gleichmäßigem Licht, Wolken vor der Sonne, oder weichem Gegenlicht, wenn die Sonne tief steht.  

Wie nutzt du das Licht für deinen persönlichen Stil? Magst du lieber ein gleichmäßig ausgeleuchtetes Foto oder gefallen dir viel Kontrast und dunkle Bereiche im Bild? Oder vielleicht hast du es lieber ein bisschen überbelichtet? Wie auch immer du Licht für dich verwendest, die Hauptsache ist, dass du glücklich mit dem bist, was das Bild ausdrückt und welches Gefühl es vermittelt. Denn schließlich willst du deine Geschichte in deinem eigenen Stil und auf deine eigene Art erzählen.

Feelgood Photography

feelgood photography detail

When having a special, good feeling, have your camera with you. In my experience, I tend to see more when I feel good and a bit emotional. As well, I tend to be more compassionate, attentive, and open which is so important for photography. And suddenly everything seems to have more meaning and depth.

I then hope that by capturing the feeling, it will stick with me. I may be able to revisit and recreate it later, because I`m more likely to remember when a picture was taken.

Capture the “feelgood”

It may seem strange wanting to photograph something that can`t be seen at all, but only sensed. I mean, a horse just looks like a horse. But peace, calm, melancholy, feelgood,… ? Everybody would capture them differently.

Someone might just see nothing in a picture, while somebody else might be completely blown away. But there`s the beauty: there is a personal element, not obvious to everyone. Our photographs speak our very unique language and it`s ok if not everybody understands.

Snapshots that stick

Yesterday, I`ve been feeling weirdly and quite strikingly peaceful and at ease for most of the day – for no apparent reason. In fact, according to what I was up to, I should have been stressed. But no, all good. Maybe I`ve breathed deep into my stomach a lot. Maybe my mind counteracted with some extra peace after having felt rather overwhelmed the day before – I don`t know. However, I wanted to preserve that feeling so I took some snapshots. Hoping that one will stick to my memory and stay attached to that sense of feelgood and ease.

How about you – have you noticed that how you feel is being translated into your photography?


Feelgood Photography Detail

Wohlfühl-Fotografie

Wenn du dich besonders wohl und gut gelaunt fühlst, nimm deine Kamera mit. Bei mir ist es so, dass ich mehr sehe, wenn ich mich gut und ein bisschen emotional fühle. Ich bin dann auch nachsichtiger mit mir selbst, achtsamer und offener, was so wichtig für das Fotografieren ist. Und alles bekommt irgendwie auf einmal mehr Bedeutung.

Ich hoffe dann, dass das Gefühl in meinem Gedächtnis bleibt, wenn ich es fotografiere. Vielleicht kann ich es später wiederhaben, weil ich mich eher wieder dahin zurückversetzen kann, wenn ich ein Bild gemacht habe.

Fotografiere “Wohlfühlen”

Kann sein, dass es seltsam scheint, etwas fotografieren zu wollen, das gar nicht wirklich zu sehen ist, sondern nur zu spüren. Ich meine, ein Pferd sieht einfach wie ein Pferd aus, aber Zufriedenheit, Ruhe, Melancholie, Wohlfühlen,… ? Das würde jeder anders festhalten.

Und deshalb sieht einer vielleicht gar nichts in einem Bild, das einen anderen besonders anspricht. Aber das ist auch das Schöne: da gibt`s ein persönliches Element, das nicht jeder erkennt. Unsere Fotos sprechen unsere ganz eigene Sprache und es ist ok, wenn sie nicht jeder versteht.

Feelgood Photography

Schnappschüsse, die bleiben

Gestern habe ich mich ganz ohne offensichtlichen Grund seltsam gut und zufrieden gefühlt. Wenn ich auf mein Programm von gestern schaue, hätte ich eher erwartet, gestresst gewesen zu sein. Aber nein, alles gut. Vielleicht habe ich viel in meinen Bauch geatmet. Vielleicht hat meine Psyche mit einer Extraportion Ruhe reagiert, weil ich mich am Tag davor überfordert gefühlt habe – keine Ahnung. Jedenfalls wollte ich das Gefühl festhalten, also habe ich ein paar Schnappschüsse gemacht. In der Hoffnung, dass einer in meinem Gedächtnis bleiben und mit diesem Wohlfühl-Gefühl verbunden sein wird.

Achte doch auch mal drauf: wirkt sich dein Gefühl auch auf deine Fotos aus?

Feelgood Photography Detail

Read more:

www.nadinewilmanns.com/how-to-remember

www.nadinewilmanns.com/how-to-get-the-feeling-into-the-picture

Lockdown Photography

lockdown photography rubber gloves on washing machine

Lockdown-Photography

How hard times can help your photography

Die originale Version dieses Posts auf Deutsch, “Lockdown-Fotografie”, wurde auf dem bekannten Fotoblog www.fotografr.de veröffentlicht. Hier ist die englische Übersetzung:

Do you recall the last days before your personal Corona lockdown? I remember them like it was yesterday and the pictures that I`ve taken. I had a strange feeling sitting in a coffee shop on Bethnal Green Road in London, just having read the headlines of the first COVID death in England. Somehow, I have taken deeper breaths that day trying to soak in as much freedom and fresh air as possible. And I have photographed even more than usual.

Despite all the weirdness of the situation, I knew that at least I could always document everything with my camera. That I don`t need to passively wait, but that I can actively move my focus on something. That has given me some feeling of control and at the same time a creative challenge.

Home Photography Lockdown Photography window view
Home-Photography Lockdown Photography bed sheets

Documenting being at home

As a matter of fact, the challenge soon turned out to be documenting being at home. During that time, I found it more helpful than ever to photograph „what is“. Even though there wasn`t happening much – after all, I was at home all the time – in my head there was going on a lot. Somehow, I wanted to find a way to express that.

And really, the more confined we are the more of a challenge this becomes, and the more there is to learn. I have been following the „One-picture-a-day-projects“ of other photographers and I`ve noticed that they haven`t just captured something very special , but as well that they have become much more sensitive to the ordinary.  

Lockdown Photography Glasses by the window Home-Photography

Each days' hero shot

Somewhere, I`ve read about a man, who couldn`t get around much due to his poor health. However, he went for a daily walk around the block with his camera. He probably didn`t get THE shot every day. But because he kept on going persistently looking for the special on his everyday route, he eventually kept discovering more and more.

Do you know when the light on your sink is at its best? Since Corona I know that – and I have noticed how that changed when my boyfriend blocked parts of the window with wooden panels. Lucky enough I didn`t know then, that now, meanwhile in Germany, I would still talk about Corona. I just tried to focus on one day at a time and get each days hero shot.

Each night I would be looking forward to reviewing my “pictures of the day” when transferring them to my phone before I went to sleep. That was my incentive – I`m sure you know the joy of finding a picture that you really love when scanning through your photos. (And by that I don`t mean technical perfection, but a picture with expression and meaning, one that evokes a feeling. That`s a different topic though…)

Home Photography How to remember light trail lockdown photography
Home-Photography, Lockdown Photography cat looking out

Open to surprises

As a photographer, I want to become better and better. And sometimes weird circumstances feature surprising opportunities to learn and to evolve. Times of restriction invite us to look out for our hero-shot of the day. And to consider the possibility that the most boring, stupid, or difficult situation might turn out as the moment of the day, at least in terms of photography.

I do recommend trying this approach for yourself. Especially when in a low mood, it can feel like hard work to pick up the camera. Yet after a few days it will become second nature and you will anticipate making progress with your personal at-home-project.

Head to www.fotografr.de to read the original, German version of this article. 

New Year

New Year lights celebration

New Year

As we enter the new year, it`s a good time to go through all our photos of this year. Of course, to reflect on the past twelve months. But as well to see how we grew as artists and to motivate us to keep on pushing forward and to become better in the new year ahead.

(On a side note: In my case, the new year is a good opportunity to organize my picture chaos, too. Click here for an article about a good organizational structure. I`ve started some organizing by the beginning of the lockdown in March but didn`t finish. Once I`ve established a consistent system that works for me, I`ll share it here.)

It`s not about pretty

Lately, I`ve had some days when I felt a little discouraged in documenting the ordinary. Because you know on Instagram you see all these super-pretty rooms and stuff and well, I don`t find my place so picture-pretty. However, looking back at the 2020 photographs, I realized that it weren`t the “pretty things” that made the best photos. But it was good light. Plus, ideally some meaning, and a very present moment that stayed.

That really motivated me again to shoot daily what is meaningful to me and focus on the light (in the truest sense of the word). Let´s feel and observe the very moment as often as possible without thinking about later or before. I`ve read and noticed that this can make an ordinary moment more meaningful.

As well I can report that it`s often just about getting started in order to get us into a habit. Like in this case the habit of documenting our lives in pictures. For example, we can begin with taking a picture of something simple as our feet and that can get us going to “see” and become aware of more.

For the year to come, I hope that I can always be thankful, curious, and unbiased. That I will be open to new experiences and surprises. And that I have faith in God`s support in order to be brave and to take healthy chances to document more. What are your wishes? Have a good start in 2021 and don`t let yourself get disheartened if the start doesn`t turn out as hoped. 

Neues Jahr

Der Start ins neue Jahr ist eine gute Zeit, um durch die Fotos von 2020 zu blättern. Natürlich um nochmal auf das Jahr zurückzuschauen. Aber auch um zu sehen, wie wir als Künstler gewachsen sind und um uns zu motivieren, weiter an uns zu arbeiten, um noch besser zu werden.

(Übrigens ist es für mich auch eine gute Gelegenheit, Ordnung mein Bilder-Chaos zu bringen. Ich habe beim ersten Lockdown im März damit begonnen, aber bin null fertig geworden. Sobald ich ein funktionierendes System entwickelt habe, werde ich es hier teilen.)

Es geht nicht um hübsch

In letzter Zeit hatte ich immer wieder Tage, an denen ich mich ein bisschen entmutigt darin gefühlt habe, das Alltägliche zu dokumentieren. Auf Instagram sieht man doch immer diese superhübschen Räume und Orte – und naja, ich finde, bei mir sieht`s nicht so „bildhübsch“ aus. Aber als ich durch meine Fotos von 2020 geschaut habe, ist mir aufgefallen: Es waren nicht die „hübschen Dinge“, die die besten Bilder ausgemacht haben. Sondern es war gutes Licht. Und idealerweise eine Bedeutung und ein „erlebter“ Moment, der mir im Gefühl geblieben ist.

Das hat mich wieder motiviert, jeden Tag zu fotografieren was Bedeutung für mich hat, und auf das Licht zu fokussieren (im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes). Ich habe gelesen und bemerkt, dass ein gewöhnlicher Moment mehr Bedeutung bekommt, wenn wir ihn richtig „fühlen“ und beobachten, ohne an vorher oder nachher zu denken.

Beginne einfach

Außerdem kann ich berichten, dass es oft einfach nur darum geht, zu beginnen, um etwas zur Gewohnheit zu machen. Wie eben die Gewohnheit, unseren Alltag in Bildern zu dokumentieren. Zum Beispiel könnten wir damit starten, einfach etwas Simples wie unsere Füße zu fotografieren. Das kann uns dann dazu verleiten, mehr zu sehen und wahrzunehmen.

Für das neue Jahr hoffe ich, dass ich dankbar, neugierig und unvoreingenommen sein kann. Dass ich offen sein werde für neue Erlebnisse und Überraschungen. Und dass ich daran glauben kann, dass Gott mich unterstützt, um dann mutiger zu sein, damit ich mehr dokumentieren kann. Was sind deine Wünsche? Hab einen guten Start in 2021 und lass dich nicht entmutigen, falls der Start nicht so läuft, wie erhofft.

Life is now

snow in Tübingen town, life is now

Life is now.

Why we should avoid postponing life

This life, don`t say „I can do that later” to something that you fancy doing if you have the possibility to do it now. Even more, if it’s of importance to you.

Because in my experience, I regret mostly what I haven`t done. Especially when there was an opportunity to do it.

life is now , snow in Tübingen town

For a photographer that means: If we pass something that we want to photograph, never think “I can come back to this later when it`s more convenient for me”. For example, how often have I walked by something, thinking “I`ll take a picture on the way back”. But then didn`t come back the same way.

Who knows what`s later: The light will be different then. Maybe the situation will not be there anymore at all. Or there might be a pandemic.

Honestly, if Corona has shown me anything, it is that we mustn´t take “later” for granted.  That seizing the day isn`t just empty talk. And that living a life that we like must not be postponed.

Leben ist jetzt. Oder: Lieber nicht verschieben

Sag nicht zu etwas, das du gerne tun würdest: “Ich kann das später noch machen“, wenn du die Möglichkeit hast, es jetzt zu tun. Vor allem wenn es dir wichtig ist.

Denn am meisten bereue ich das, was ich nicht gemacht habe. Besonders wenn es Gelegenheit dazu gab, es zu tun.

Für das Fotografieren heißt das: Wenn wir an etwas vorbeigehen, das wir fotografieren wollen, nicht zu denken: „Ich kann später zurückkommen, wenn ich mehr Zeit habe.“ Wie oft habe ich etwas gesehen und dachte „Ich mach ein Foto, wenn ich auf dem Rückweg wieder vorbeigehe.” Bin dann aber gar nicht auf dem gleichen Weg zurückgegangen.

Wer weiß, was später sein wird: Das Licht wird vermutlich anders sein. Vielleicht ist die Situation überhaupt nicht mehr da. Oder es könnte eine Pandemie ausbrechen.

Also wenn Corona mir etwas gezeigt hat, dann dass wir „Später“ nicht für selbstverständlich nehmen dürfen. Dass “den Tag pflücken” nicht nur leeres Gerede ist. Und dass wir das Leben, das wir leben möchten, nicht verschieben sollten.

life is now, snow in Tübingen town

Copycat Creativity Technique

Copycat

The Copycat Technique

for Creativity

Copying, as “bad” as it may sound, is actually a very good technique to get creative. The best designers use it. While the process may start with a plain copy, it ends with something very own and unique. Because you`ll add your own input and vision into the development, you`ll take the copy to a higher level, creating something with your own voice and style.

When I was still a fashion design student, I worked for Giles Deacon in London for a while. Still naïve and thinking ideas come right out of thin air or pure imagination, I was shocked: In the design studio, we were given pictures out of fashion magazines and were told to copy and rework certain items. I thought: Is he for real?? Is he just copying other people’s work and making out it`s his own idea?

Be a copycat to fly

In the years after, I have learned that it is common for designers to begin with a copy. But then, what starts as a copy is transforming into a completely own design. While copying you come up with new ideas, you bring in your own style, you amend details to match your own vision. The final result might not even resemble the “original” anymore. (And really: they most likely aren`t originals anyway, because they themselves are copied and transformed from another “original” at some point). Call it inspiration if you like.

The same goes for photography, writing, drawing, all arts for that matter: The copy is like the push or the run-up before you fly on your own.

Die Copycat-Technik

für Kreativität

Kopieren, so “schlecht” es klingt, ist tatsächlich eine sehr gute Technik, um kreativ zu sein. Die besten Designer machen das. Der Prozess beginnt zwar mit einer Kopie, aber er endet mit etwas Eigenem und Einzigartigem. Weil du deinen eigenen Input und deine Vision in die Entwicklung mit reingibst, bringst du die Kopie auf ein höheres Level und machst am Ende etwas in deinem ganz eigenen Stil.

Als Modestudentin habe ich eine Zeitlang bei Giles Deacon in London gearbeitet. Ganz naiv dachte ich, Ideen kommen einfach so aus dem Nichts und purer Fantasie. Als man uns Fotos aus Magazinen gab, um einzelne Sachen davon nachzuarbeiten, also zu kopieren, war ich schockiert. Ich dachte: Soll das ein Witz sein?? Kopiert er einfach die Arbeit anderer und tut dann so, als wär`s seine eigene Idee?

Kopieren um zu fliegen

In den folgenden Jahren habe ich gelernt, dass es ganz normal für einen Designer ist, zu kopieren. Aber dann verwandelt sich das, was als Kopie beginnt, in ein ganz eigenes Design. Während des Kopierens kommst du auf neue Ideen, du bringst deinen Stil ein, du änderst Sachen ab und passt sie deiner eigenen Vorstellung an. Das Endergebnis sieht dann dem „Original“ oft nicht mal mehr ähnlich. (Und ein Original war das wahrscheinlich sowieso nicht, denn auch dieses „Original“ wurde irgendwann von etwas anderem kopiert und weiterentwickelt.) Man kann das auch Inspiration nennen, wenn man so will.

Das Gleiche gilt fürs Fotografieren, Schreiben, Malen und Kunst überhaupt: Die Kopie ist wie ein Schubs oder ein Anlauf bevor du selbst fliegst.

copycat

Read more: How to be creative

Success Stories

Photography black and white selfie for blog about success

Stories we tell about ourselves

How do we define success? And are we giving it our own definition, or do we let others define it for us? What story do we tell about ourselves? And are we dreaming big or do we let others limit our dreams, and what we dare to expect?

There are so many opinions and voices that can restrict us and that don`t serve us at all. For example: “Successful people are those who make a lot of money or who have fame.” If we have neither money nor fame, we might fall into the trap of thinking that we are not successful. But wait for a second: Is this definition matching our own standards of success at all?

And what kind of story do we tell about ourselves in general?

After the past two weeks, I could be telling, that I have failed a lot and that I`m unsuccessful. But honestly what would be the point of a story like this? It would not only be depressing; it also would not serve me at all.

We have one life, so why not tell a good story about it! So, instead I say: “I have taken some bold steps lately. At the same time, I`ve gained a good deal of experience with criticism both fair and unfair, even some unfriendliness. Either way, I`ve learned a lot. Most of all, I haven`t let anything cause me to abandon my dreams and I keep dreaming big. I expect great opportunities and adventures coming my way because I trust God to have a good plan for me.”

Selfie with dog

A friend of mine said to me that her co-worker has warned her: “In our job, we have to be very flexible.” There are so many ideas and opinions about how we SHOULD be. But especially as creatives I think we don`t have to accept the boundaries of common opinions. If we work to our own heart’s content, not for the judgment of others, we work with the heart of an artist. And we can accomplish a lot and more, if we just never lose faith, tell our story favourably, and define success in a way that sustains us and doesn`t discourage us.

Stories, die wir über uns erzählen

Was ist Erfolg? Legen wir für uns selbst fest, was Erfolg für uns bedeutet, oder lassen wir uns das von anderen vorgeben? Was für eine Geschichte erzählen wir von uns? Und haben wir große Träume, oder lassen wir uns von anderen Grenzen setzen, in dem was wir uns zutrauen?

Es gibt so viele Meinungen und Stimmen, die uns einschränken können und die uns überhaupt nicht nützlich sind. Zum Beispiel: „Erfolgreiche Leute verdienen viel Geld und sind angesehen und bekannt.“ Wenn wir aber weder Geld haben noch besonders anerkannt sind? Dann könnten wir in die Falle tappen zu denken wir seien nicht erfolgreich. Aber warte mal: Passt diese Art von „Erfolg“ denn überhaupt zu unseren eigenen Maßstäben?

Und was für eine Geschichte erzählen wir überhaupt von uns?

Nach den letzten beiden Wochen könnte ich erzählen, dass ich oft gescheitert bin und dass ich keinen Erfolg habe. Aber ehrlich, was würde denn so eine Geschichte bringen? Es wäre nicht nur eine deprimierende Geschichte, sie würde mir auch nichts nützen.

Wir haben ein Leben, also warum sollten wir nicht gute Geschichten davon erzählen! Also sage ich stattdessen: „Ich habe in letzter Zeit ziemlich viel gewagt. Gleichzeitig habe ich Erfahrungen mit Kritik – fairer und unfairer Kritik – und sogar Unfreundlichkeiten gesammelt. So oder so habe ich viel gelernt. Vor allem habe ich mich nicht daran hindern lassen, weiterhin große Träume zu haben. Ich erwarte tolle Gelegenheiten und Abenteuer, weil ich darauf vertraue, dass Gott einen guten Plan für mich hat.“

selfie with dog in flash light

Eine Freundin sagte mir neulich, dass ihre Kollegin sie ermahnt hat:  “In unserem Job müssen wir besonders flexibel sein.“ Es gibt so viele Vorstellungen davon, wie wir sein SOLLTEN. Aber vor allem als Kreative brauchen wir uns doch nicht mit den Grenzen gewöhnlicher Meinungen abfinden. Wenn wir zu unserer eigenen Freude arbeiten und nicht für das Urteil anderer, dann arbeiten wir mit dem Herz eines Künstlers. Und wir können viel und noch mehr erreichen, wenn wir nie aufhören zu glauben, unsere Geschichte vorteilhaft erzählen und Erfolg so definieren, dass es uns nicht entmutigt sondern stärkt.

How to learn from mistakes

notebook notes about mistakes to learn

Create a personal notebook of learned lessons

Create a personal notebook of learned lessons

Isn`t it that our own mistakes are our best teachers? Yet, I still dread to make mistakes. And on top of that, I often feel like I haven`t learned at all, thinking: ‘Oh no, I should know by now – why have I made this mistake AGAIN?’

Therefore, I have now started collecting my photography mistakes in a notebook. But actually, no – and here`s the trick: It`s more like I`m collecting learning lessons, solutions, or advice. After each photo shoot, I review everything. From the planning to the photoshoot itself, to post-processing and communication with people in the process. I then think about how I can improve. Basically, I`m giving myself advice. Or I`m asking fellow photographers or talk to other people to hear their advice. And then I note this down. Together with the date and the name of the photoshoot so I can remember the precise situation. 

Collecting lessons

I wouldn’t write down the “negative” like: “Shouldn`t have stayed in that bad light when photographing that person.” But I would note down the solution: “When the light isn`t good, I can ask for two minutes to myself to look for better options.” This way, I`m turning mistakes straight into learning. And by noting it down it`s more likely to stay with me. Plus, I can scroll through the pages before a photoshoot to remind myself of relevant things to consider.

Another side effect of these notes: I´m not so terribly scared of making mistakes anymore. Because I can effectively turn them into learnt lessons in my notebook – in fact, I`m now collecting them. Not that I would make mistakes on purpose, of course. But when they happen, I now can finally see them more as opportunities for learning. This as well makes it easier to get over these mistakes quickly, and not giving myself a hard time for having made them. Because I feel I`m actively doing something to improve.

Faith

Someone once told me a story about a teacher of people who are to be trained to sell stuff. (I think I have shared this story before, but it really fits here, so here it is again). This teacher sends his students out for a competition: They all should knock on people’s doors to sell stuff. The one who collects the most rejections in one week is the winner.

I found this story really encouraging: We don`t need to run from rejection – and not from mistakes either. Instead, we can say: ‘Oh, I can learn something here.’ And: ‘I am on the way of making progress.’ Rejection as well as mistakes are part of the job (and part of life really). The braver we are, the more we try with faith instead of fear, the more we experience, and the more we learn and grow.

Mach dir ein Notizbuch mit Lektionen

Mach dir ein Notizbuch mit Lektionen

Sind nicht unsere eigenen Fehler unsere besten Lehrer? Trotzdem graut es mir immer ein bisschen davor, Fehler zu machen. Und außerdem habe ich oft das Gefühl gar nichts gelernt zu haben und denke: ‚Oh nein, ich sollte das doch inzwischen besser wissen – warum hab ich diesen Fehler nun schon wieder gemacht?‘

Deswegen habe ich jetzt damit begonnen, meine Fotografie- Fehler in einem Notizbuch zu sammeln. Also nein, eigentlich sammle ich nicht meine Fehler – und hier ist der Trick: Ich sammle eher Lösungen oder Ratschläge an mich selbst. Nach jedem Fotoshooting gehe ich alles nochmal durch: Von der Planung, über das Fotoshooting selbst, zur Nachbearbeitung und der Kommunikation mit denen, die beteiligt waren. Und ich überlege, wie ich was besser machen kann. Ich berate mich also selbst. Oder ich frage befreundete Fotografen oder rede mit anderen, um deren Rat zu hören. Und dann schreibe ich das auf, zusammen mit dem Datum und Namen des Fotoshootings, damit mir eine konkrete Situation dazu im Kopf bleibt. 

Lektionen sammeln

Ich schreibe nicht das “Negative” auf, also  beispielsweise nicht: “Ich hätte mit der Person, die ich fotografiert habe, nicht in diesem schlechten Licht bleiben sollen.“ Sondern ich notiere mir eine Lösung: „Wenn es nur schlechtes Licht gibt, kann ich um 2 Minuten Zeit für mich fragen, um mich nach besseren Optionen umzuschauen.” So werden Fehler direkt in Ratschlägen und Lernerfahrungen umgewandelt. Dadurch, dass ich das aufschreibe, kann ich es mir besser merken. Und ich kann vor einem Fotoshooting nochmal durch die Notizen blättern, um mich an Dinge zu erinnern, die ich beachten muss.

Noch ein Effekt ist: Ich habe nicht mehr so sehr Angst davor, Fehler zu machen. Weil ich sie in effektive Lektionen in meinem Notizbuch verwandeln kann – ich sammle sie sogar. Natürlich mache ich nicht absichtlich Fehler. Aber wenn sie passieren, kann ich sie endlich als Gelegenheiten zum Lernen sehen. Das macht es gleichzeitig einfacher, schnell über diese Fehler hinwegzukommen. Und mir selbst nicht das Leben mit Selbstkritik schwer zu machen. Immerhin habe ich das Gefühl, dass ich aktiv etwas mache, um besser zu werden.

Vertrauen

Es gibt eine Geschichte von einem Lehrer mit Studenten, die lernen sollen Dinge zu verkaufen.  (Ich hab sie glaub ich schon mal in einem Post erzählt, aber sie passt hier so gut, dass ich sie nochmal erzähle). Dieser Lehrer schickt alle seine Schüler in einen Wettbewerb: Alle sollen bei irgendwelchen Leuten an deren Türen klopfen und ihnen etwas verkaufen. Derjenige, der die meisten Absagen bekommt, ist der Gewinner.

Mich hat diese Geschichte total motiviert. Wir brauchen  vor Ablehnung nicht wegzurennen – und auch nicht von unseren Fehlern. Stattdessen können wir sagen: ‘Ah, da kann ich was lernen.’  Ablehnung genauso wie Fehler sind Teil des Jobs (und des Lebens). Je mutiger wir sind, je mehr wir mit Offenheit und Vertrauen statt mir Angst ausprobieren und versuchen, desto mehr Erfahrungen können wir sammeln und desto mehr können wir lernen und besser werden.

notebook to learn from mistakes and dog

Creativity

Selfie with dog. Creativity

Notes about creativity after a not overly creative, busy day

Creativity needs some prayers and letting go. It needs fresh air and downtime. Chats with friends, some laughing out loud and being childish. Truly tasting and enjoying a piece of cake, a milky coffee with whipped cream on top, or something we love. Some moving around helps, too – be it doing a dance, going for a walk, or just cleaning or tidying up. Going out. Observing. Screen-free time. Reading. Daydreaming. A hot shower. Time. It certainly needs the Sunday off to wind down and relax – or any day once a week for that matter.

Furthermore, creativity needs patience, forgiving self-care, and softness. We need to be “on our side” and “for us” no matter what`s going on. What can we do here at this very moment for ourselves? On the other hand, I don`t think that creativity minds a push, effort, and discipline though. And it does need commitment, resilience, habit, and the occasional fight.

Feeling heartbreak, hardship, and suffering in just the right kind of dosage are just brilliant for being creative. By the right kind of dosage, I mean as much, as it doesn`t paralyze us.

Defining success according to our own standards.

Personally, I find creativity dies with comparison, judgment, inner pressure, and trying to please people. But it grows with the idea of abundance and that there`s space for everyone. When I`m open and without judgment towards others, I can be more creative myself. 

When too busy there`s no room for creativity because it needs its space to unfold. Sometimes it needs saying: “Stop, that`s enough, I`m gonna go on thinking about this tomorrow, but for now I need a break.” It, too, needs saying: “Thanks God for what I`ve achieved already, and I trust that you`ll give me a good idea when I need it.”

Notizen zum Kreativsein nach einem mittelmäßig kreativen, sehr geschäftigen Tag

Kreativität braucht Gebete und loslassen. Sie braucht frische Luft und Auszeit. Mit Freunden reden, laut lachen, kindisch sein. Mit richtig viel Genuss ein Stück Kuchen essen oder einen Milchkaffee mit Sahne obendrauf trinken oder eben etwas was wir lieben. Bewegung hilft auch – sei es tanzen, spazieren gehen oder auch einfach putzen und aufräumen. Rausgehen. Beobachten. Zeit ohne Bildschirm. Lesen. Tagträumen. Eine heiße Dusche. Zeit. Kreativität braucht auf jeden Fall Sonntags Freiheit, zum runterkommen und entspannen – oder an sonst einem Tag in der Woche.

Sie braucht Geduld, sich selber vergeben und sich gut um sich selbst kümmern. Wir müssen „auf unserer Seite“ und „für uns“ sein, was auch immer gerade los ist. Was können wir hier gerade eben für uns tun? Andererseits denke ich nicht, dass ein Schubs, Mühe und Disziplin der Kreativität schaden. Und sie braucht auf jeden Fall Verbindlichkeit, Ausdauer, Gewohnheit und ab und zu Kampf.

Herzschmerz, Schwierigkeiten und Leiden in der richtigen Dosierung sind perfekt, um kreativ zu sein. Mit der richtigen Dosis meine ich so viel, dass es uns nicht lähmt.

Erfolg entsprechend unsrer eigenen Maßstäbe definieren

Persönlich finde ich, dass Kreativität durch Vergleiche, Werturteile, inneren Druck und “Anderen-gefallen-wollen” stirbt. Aber sie wächst mit der Idee, dass es Überfluss gibt und Platz für jeden. Wenn ich offen bin und andere nicht beurteile und bewerte, kann ich selbst kreativer sein. 

Zu viel zu tun zu haben, nimmt der Kreativität den Raum, weil sie Platz zum Entfalten braucht.

Manchmal müssen wir sagen: „Stop, das reicht jetzt, ich mache mir da morgen weiter Gedanken, aber jetzt brauche ich erstmal Pause.“ Und auch: „Danke Gott, was ich schon erreicht habe, und ich verlasse mich darauf, dass du mir eine gute Idee gibst, wenn ich eine brauche.“

creativity. selfie with dog
creativity selfie with dog

Read more: 

Light-Photography

in your style light on coffee shop chairs light photography

Light-Photography

Some of my favourite photographs are of light. By that, I mean light as the main element; those pictures that are purely about the light.

At times I find it quite relaxing to not look for “pretty things”, but just a light spot. And then experiment. Sometimes I delete the whole lot of pictures again later because there wasn`t anything of significance. But it`s all about experimenting anyway. And often there are surprises.

Underexpose

What I do is, I underexpose the picture via exposure compensation so that the exposure is right for the light spot while the rest of the picture is underexposed. (On the camera phone that means moving the exposure slider right down). If the light spot is very bright compared to its surroundings that means you`ll have a lot of black areas in your picture. But that`s usually brilliant because it adds to the drama.

When days are quite challenging (like lately), I find it kind of “energy-preserving” to just lift my attention on something as simple as the light for a while. Nothing exciting has to happen, no beautiful surroundings are needed, just a light spot and a camera.

By the way, in this regard, I really like this blog post on A Farm Girls Life: “Light and Shadow Experiments”. It makes you feel like light hunting right away. Enjoy:_)

feeling into the picture light photography light on plant
the ordinary Light photography light on door

Licht-Fotografie

Licht-Fotos gehören zu meinen Lieblingsfotos. Damit meine ich Fotos, die Licht als Hauptelement haben; solche, in denen es nur um das Licht geht.

Manchmal finde ich es ganz entspannend, nicht unbedingt „hübsche Dinge“ sehen zu wollen, sondern einfach nur nach einem Lichtfleck Ausschau zu halten. Und dann zu experimentieren. Kommt vor, dass ich später alle Bilder wieder lösche, weil nichts Besonderes dabei war. Aber es geht ja eh vor allem um das Experiment. Und oft sind Überraschungen dabei.

Unterbelichten

Ich mach` es so, dass ich das Bild über die manuelle Belichtungskorrektur unterbelichte, damit die Belichtung genau richtig für den Lichtfleck ist, während das restliche Foto unterbelichtet wird. Wenn der Lichtfleck im Vergleich zur Umgebung sehr hell ist, hat man viele schwarze Bereiche im Bild. Aber das ist meistens gerade gut, weil das Licht dann noch dramatischer wird.

An anstrengenden Tagen (wie in dieser Corona-Zeit) finde ich es „energieschonend“ meine Aufmerksamkeit für eine Weile auf etwas Einfaches wie Licht zu richten. Nichts Spannendes muss passieren, man braucht keine superschöne Umgebung, nur einen Lichtfleck und eine Kamera.

Übrigens mag ich in dem Zusammenhang den Blog Post auf A Farm Girls Life: “Light and Shadow Experiments”. Man bekommt sofort Lust, auf Licht-Jagd zu gehen. Viel Spaß :_)

Home Photography How to remember light trail lockdown photography
light photography light spot on pile of notebooks

Capture the 50:50

boat in London Capture the 50:50

Capture the 50:50

Did you know that life is 50:50? It`s half positive and half negative – a balance.  I`ve learned that in an episode of “The life coach school” by Brooke Castillo. I kind of knew that, and then again, I didn`t. What it means is: It`s just fine and normal to not have great things happening half the time. I don`t have to “fix” that, but it`s part of the human experience.

In order to document life as a photographer, we don`t just capture the happy and bright moments, but the dark ones too. Because only both together make up the full human experience, the full story.

More creative...

When feeling sad or worried, picking up the camera often feels like a huge effort to me. I probably find it hard to face what`s bothering me, and rather want to block it out and avoid it.

There can be great beauty in the “negative”, tough. Just think of all those bittersweet stories in the cinemas – those films wouldn’t be half as beautiful if they didn’t tell us about all the heartbreak. And it`s the heartbreak that makes us sensitive to a lot of beauty around us – and that can ultimately make us more creative.

Man in black and white Capture the 50:50 your story

The full bittersweet experience

If we practise to photograph the “negative 50”, we might not feel the urge to avoid them anymore. We might stop being afraid of heartbreak, because we know that we can “be” with it by looking for it`s weird and special beauty. And our photographs will remind us that worries, fears, difficulties, or sorrow weren`t here to stay. But that there was some of the “other 50” after.

This way, the camera could help us as a tool to face hard times. It may help us to be “present with whatever the truth is right now”, as Brooke Castillo puts it.

With all the uncertainties ahead, it`s good to know that God has provided a good balance for us, and that, however we will feel, we can pick up our camera and observe and document. That way, we can find the beauty that may be hidden. And we won`t need to avoid, but we can have the full bittersweet experience of life.

Fotografiere das 50:50

Wusstest du, dass das Leben 50:50 ist? Halb positiv, halb negativ- ein Gleichgewicht. Ich habe das in einer Folge des Podcasts „The life coach school” von Brooke Castillo gelernt. Ich wusste das schon irgendwie, aber so richtig klar war es mir nicht. Es ist ok und normal, dass die Hälfte der Zeit nicht besonders toll ist, sondern vielleicht anstrengend und manchmal sogar schmerzhaft. Ich muss das nicht „beheben“, sondern es ist einfach Teil der menschlichen Erlebens.

Um als Fotograf echtes Leben zu dokumentieren, fangen wir nicht nur die glücklichen, strahlenden Momente ein, sondern auch die Dunklen. Weil sie nur zusammen das menschliche Erlebnis ausmachen und die Geschichte komplett machen.

Kreativer...

Wenn wir traurig oder besorgt sind, dann kann es sich wie eine große Anstrengung anfühlen, die Kamera in die Hand zu nehmen. Wir finden es vielleicht schwer, uns dem zu stellen, was uns umtreibt. Wir wollen es vielleicht lieber ausblenden und einen Bogen drum herum machen.

Aber im „Negativen“ kann große Schönheit sein. Denk nur an die bittersüßen Geschichten in den Kinos. Diese Filme wären nur halb so schön, wenn sie uns nicht von all dem Herzschmerz erzählen würden. Und dieser Herzschmerz macht uns erst sensibel für manches Schöne um uns herum – und macht uns letztlich kreativer.

in your style view from the dlr London Capture the 50:50

Das ganze bittersüße Erlebnis

Wenn wir uns darin üben, die „negativen 50“ zu fotografieren, dann fühlen wir vielleicht nicht mehr so sehr den Drang, sie zu vermeiden. Wir haben dann vielleicht keine Angst mehr vor ihnen, denn wir wissen, dass wir mit ihnen „sein“ können, indem wir nach ihrer seltsamen und besonderen Schönheit Ausschau halten. Und unsere Fotos werden uns daran erinnern, dass Sorgen, Angst, Schwierigkeiten und Traurigkeit nicht geblieben sind. Sondern, dass danach auch wieder was von den „anderen 50“ kam.

So könnte uns unsere Kamera dabei helfen, schwierige Zeiten gut zu meistern. „Ganz da zu sein, mit der Wirklichkeit von gerade eben“, wie Brooke Castillo es ausdrückt.

Bei allen Unsicherheiten unseres Lebens, ist es gut zu wissen, dass Gott eine gute Balance für uns hat und dass wir, wie immer wir uns fühlen, unsere Kamera in die Hand nehmen können, beobachten und dokumentieren können. So können wir die Schönheit finden, die versteckt liegen könnte. Und wir brauchen nichts zu meiden, sondern wir können das volle bittersüße Erlebnis haben.

Read more about photography and life: Home-Stories

Shadow stories

Fashion Memories Shadow stories selfie with dog

How to tell your stories with shadows

Have you ever been out and wondered how to take a picture with yourself in the scene? How to tell the story of your moment, but without taking a typical selfie?

Well, if there is a strong light source, like when it`s sunny, there is always the option of a shadow selfie. Which means photographing your shadow (and be it only of your hand). I`m a huge fan of shadow stories and I attempt them super often.

While shadow pictures are always a good idea, it`s especially nice to take them now in the autumn light, which has this beautiful intense and golden quality.

A mood of character

Shadows allow you to be playful and to make some art, while creating a mood of character. You can kind of “paint” your photograph with them. Either having the shadows supplementing the composition. Then they add a layer of depth, meaning and expression to a picture.

Or you focus right on the shadow as your main element in the frame. Either way, they help you to tell a story in a very special way.

Shadow stories selfie with dog and man

For the camera-shy

Another brilliant thing about a shadow picture: it`s THE option for people who are camera-shy. My boyfriend for example – he needs to be in a really excellent mood to willingly having his face in my frame. So, I usually just go with a shadow picture of us.

Try it – the autumn with its huge contrasts has just begun. I am looking forward to what stories your photographs are going to tell!

Schatten-Geschichten

Warst du schon mal unterwegs und hast dir überlegt, wie du am besten ein Bild mit dir selbst in der Szene machst? Wie du deinen Moment erzählst, ohne, dass es ein typisches Selfie wird?

Wenn du eine starke Lichtquelle hast, zum Beispiel an einem sonnigen Tag die Sonne, gibt es immer die Möglichkeit eines Schatten-Selfies. Also ein Foto von deinem eigenen Schatten (und sei`s nur dem von deiner Hand). Ich bin ein großer Fan von Schatten-Geschichten und ich versuche mich andauernd daran.

Ein Schatten-Foto ist immer eine gute Idee, aber jetzt gerade ist die Idee besonders gut, denn Herbstlicht hat diese besonders schöne intensive, goldene Qualität.

Stimmung mit Charakter

Schatten erlauben es dir, spielerisch und künstlerisch zu fotografieren und dabei eine besondere Stimmung mit Charakter zu erzeugen. Du kannst dein Foto damit quasi „bemalen“. Entweder ergänzen die Schatten deine Komposition und geben dem Bild eine Extraschicht an Tiefe, Bedeutung und Ausdruck.

Oder du fokussiert direkt auf den Schatten als dein Hauptelement im Bild. In jedem Fall helfen dir Schatten dabei, auf eine besondere Art und Weise eine Geschichte zu erzählen.

Shadow stories selfie waiting for train

Für die Kamera-Scheuen

Ein weiterer sehr praktischer Vorteil eines Schatten-Fotos: Es ist DIE Option für Leute, die fotoscheu sind. Mein Freund zum Beispiel – er muss schon in einer sehr guten Laune sein, um sein Gesicht in meinen Bildausschnitt zu halten. Also mache ich meistens einfach nur ein Schattenbild von uns.

Probier‘ es aus – der Herbst mit seinen schönen Kontrasten hat gerade erst begonnen. Ich bin gespannt, was deine Fotos erzählen!

Shadow stories selfie with shadow hand on pullover

If you enjoyed reading this, here is another post about storytelling with photography: In the Mirror

The Happiness Factor (in Photography)

fashion storytelling Your story Happiness Factor Fashion Photography McWilmanns Nadine Wilmanns

The Happiness Factor

Today I have been thinking about something I have heard a while ago. The opening question is: How come people like some pictures and then there are other pictures that they don`t like? And I mean regardless of the quality of the photograph.

So here is what I`ve heard in an Instagram webinar by photographer Katelyn James: If people are having a good time while they are being photographed, they are much more likely to love the pictures later. And if the pictures are technically brilliant and everyone is looking great, but the people didn`t FEEL great while being photographed, they are most likely not going to like the pictures.

Makes sense because memories and pictures are very much linked. And when looking at a picture we almost always feel something. Either how we felt in that situation when the picture was taken, or how we would feel in that situation (if the picture is of someone else).

Long story short: The photographers’ task is of course to take good pictures, but it`s equally important to make everyone feel good, pretty, welcome, happy, relaxed and funny. 

I was thinking about this on my way home from a little photo session today. We all have laughed a lot, because everyone was so cheerful. So I left with a good feeling thinking: there should be some likeable photos because of the fun involved. 

PS: The photos in this article are from a different – but equally fun – job. 

fashion storytelling Happiness Factor people on bench for fashion photo

Heute habe ich über etwas nachgedacht, das ich vor einigen Wochen gehört habe. Die Ausgangsfrage ist: Warum mögen Leute manche Bilder gern und manche gar nicht gern? Und ich meine ganz unabhängig von der Qualität der Aufnahme.

Also Folgendes habe ich in einem Instagram Webinar von Fotografin  Katelyn James gehört: Wenn Leute eine gute Zeit haben, während sie fotografiert werden, werden sie die Bilder später eher mögen. Und wenn die Bilder zwar technisch super sind und alle darauf toll aussehen, sich aber nicht toll FÜHLEN, während sie fotografiert werden, dann werden sie die Bilder höchstwahrscheinlich nicht so sehr mögen.

Macht Sinn für mich, denn Erinnerungen und Bilder sind nun mal sehr miteinander verbunden. Und wenn wir ein Bild anschauen, dann fühlen wir so gut wie immer irgendetwas. Entweder, wie wir uns in der Situation gefühlt haben, als das Foto gemacht wurde. Oder wie wir uns in der Situation fühlen würden (wenn nicht wir selbst auf dem Foto sind).

Langer Rede kurzer Sinn: Die Aufgabe des Fotografen ist es natürlich gute Bilder zu machen (wobei gut ja einigermaßen subjektiv ist). Aber es ist genauso wichtig, jeden gut, hübsch, willkommen, zufrieden, entspannt und witzig fühlen zu lassen.  

An das habe ich gedacht, als ich heute auf dem Rückweg von einer kleiner Fotosession war. Wir haben alle viel gelacht, weil alle so gute Laune hatten. Also bin ich mit einem guten Gefühl gegangen und habe gedacht: Da sollten auf jeden Fall ein paar Fotos dabei sein, die gut ankommen, weil so viel Spaß involviert war.

PS: Die Fotos für diesen Artikel sind von einem anderen – aber auch sehr lustigen – Job.

X Fashion and Lifestyle Photography Portfolio Nadine Wilmanns
X Fashion and Lifestyle Photography Portfolio Nadine Wilmanns

For contact information regarding potential assignments click HERE.

Time and progress

time and progress fashion memories watch and wristlet

Time and Progress

Time is a tricky thing. It`s my birthday this weekend, reminding me of how fast time goes by. I feel like I cannot keep up at all. On the other hand, time brings some good stuff like progress, growth, and knowledge.

"If your goal is the time itself..."

However, I sometimes struggle to see my progress and I often don`t give myself credit for it. Or I become impatient. In this context I`m reminded about something that I’ ve heard in a conversation with street photographer Brandon Stanton (Humans of NY) on the podcast “Magic Lessons with Elisabeth Gilbert”.  He said that many goals depend on stuff we can`t control, for example, whether people like our work or not. “But if your goal is the time itself, just the time, then it becomes much simpler and more achievable. Because it depends on one thing: How you spend your time.”

Focus on the time

Success then isn`t the result, but the time spent with the work. Brandon Stanton suggests not to focus on a result like ‘I want to be a successful photojournalist’ or ‘I want to be a bestselling author’. We shouldn`t take a goal that is out of our control as a benchmark for success.

Instead, he advises to rather focus on the time we spend on the way. For example: “I spend one hour every morning to write”, or: “I take some time photographing every day.”

A gentle approach to success

As someone who struggles with competitive situations and who is easily intimidated by expectations or having to achieve things, I love this. It seems like a sustainable and somewhat gentle approach to success.

I still don`t know how to feel ok about aging. But I know what I can do meanwhile: valuing time I spend on things, rather than being anxious about the result. And have faith that there will be some good progress eventually and that God will take care of the outcome.

Zeit und Wachsen

Zeit ist eine schwierige Angelegenheit. Dieses Wochenende ist mein Geburtstag und erinnert mich daran, wie schnell die Zeit vergeht. Ich habe das Gefühl, dass ich überhaupt nicht mithalten kann. Andererseits bringt Zeit auch gute Sachen, wie Entwicklung, Wachstum und Wissen.

"Wenn dein Ziel die Zeit selbst ist..."

Allerdings fällt es mir oft schwer, meine Fortschritte zu sehen und anzuerkennen. Oder ich werde ungeduldig. In dem Zusammenhang fällt mir etwas ein, das ich in einem Gespräch mit Fotograf Brandon Stanton (Humans of NY) im Podcast “Magic Lessons with Elisabeth Gilbert” gehört habe.

Er sagt, dass viele Ziele von Dingen abhängig sind, die nicht in unserer Hand sind. Zum Beispiel ob Leute unsere Arbeit mögen oder nicht. „Aber wenn die Zeit selbst das Ziel ist, nur die Zeit, dann wird alles viel einfacher und machbarer. Denn der Erfolg hängt dann von einer Sache ab: Wie ich meine Zeit verbringe.“

Erfolgsfaktor Zeit

Erfolg ist dann nicht das Endergebnis, sondern Zeit mit der Arbeit selbst verbracht zu haben.

Brandon Stanton schlägt vor, sich nicht so sehr auf ein Endziel (wie ‚Ich will ein erfolgreicher Fotojournalist sein‘, oder: ‚Ich will einen Bestseller schreiben.‘) zu konzentrieren.

Statt Erfolg an einem Ziel messen, das wir nicht kontrollieren können, rät er, uns lieber auf die Zeit und den Weg dahin zu konzentrieren. Zum Beispiel ‚Ich will jeden morgen eine Stunde schreiben‘ , oder: ‚Ich nehme mir jeden Tag Zeit zum Fotografieren.‘

Eine nachhaltige Einstellung zum Erfolg

Als jemand, der Konkurrenzsituationen nicht mag und der sich leicht von Erwartungen und Erfolgsdenken einschüchtern lässt, mag ich diese Herangehensweise. Es scheint mir eine nachhaltige und irgendwie sanfte Einstellung zum Erfolg zu sein.

Ich weiß immer noch nicht, wie man mit dem Altern gut klarkommt. Aber ich weiß, was ich inzwischen tun kann: Die Zeit zu schätzen, die ich mit Dingen verbringen, anstatt mich mit Gedanken über das Ergebnis zu stressen. Und darauf vertrauen, dass ich Fortschritte mache und Gott den Rest schon für mich machen wird.

How to catch the moment

How to catch the moment Documentary photography Nadine Wilmanns

How to catch the moment

Overthinking is very inconvenient in photography, especially photojournalism. Life is changing in seconds. If you think instead of just pressing the shutter, you will usually miss the “decisive moment”.

I often catch myself thinking “Shall I take a picture?” or “Will somebody mind?” or “What will people think?” I really want to challenge myself to not do that any more. Instead I want to replace hesitating with the reflex to just focus and press the shutter. Thinking and hesitating are just not useful in these situations.

“Every time my finger wants to press the trigger, I don`t question it.

I just do it.”

In one of my favourite documentaries about photographer Koci Hendandez, he says: “When I have a camera in my hands, my head and my heart are connecting in a way that says ‘press that button’ – and I do.” And: “We all have the inclination when we have a camera to take a picture, and all I did was learn not to resist that. Every time my finger wants to press the trigger for whatever reason, I don`t question it. I just do it.”

He says that with so much energy and determination – it`s contagious. Go for it, be brave, question later, do not miss a moment. Especially as we`re shooting digital now 99 per cent of the time, so everything can be deleted anyway.

Shoot first, ask questions later

I’ m a big hesitater as a photographer as well as generally in life – which has made me miss a lot of opportunities and experiences. So, I urgently want to work on that and practice overriding the hesitation- and-overthinking-reflex with a new trust-your-instinct-and-go-for-it-reflex. As a photographer but as well in other areas of life.

Street Photographer Steve Simon says: “I shoot first, I ask questions later.” And: “If you take time to think, you`ll miss the shot. So you`ve just got to trust your instincts and shoot and hope for the best.”  Will the shot turn out great? The thing is: you won`t know until you try.

Den Moment einfangen

Zu viel nachdenken ist ungünstig in der Fotografie, vor allem im Fotojournalismus. Das Leben verändert sich im Sekundenschritt. Wenn du nachdenkst, anstatt einfach den Auslöser zu drücken, dann verpasst du meist den „entscheidenden Augenblick“.  

Ich ertappe mich oft dabei, wie ich denke „Soll ich das fotografieren?“, „Stört es jemanden?“ oder „Was könnten die Leute denken?“. Ich will es mir wirklich zur Aufgabe machen, das nicht mehr zu machen. Stattdessen will ich dieses Zögern durch den Reflex ersetzen, einfach zu fokussieren und abzudrücken. Nachdenken und Zögern sind einfach nicht praktisch in diesen Situationen.

“Jedes Mal, wenn mein Finger den Auslöser drücken will, frage ich nicht.

Ich mach‘ es.”

In einer meiner Lieblingsdokus über Fotograf Koci Hernandez sagt er: „Wenn ich eine Kamera in meinen Händen halte, dann verbinden sich mein Kopf und mein Herz auf eine Weise, dass sie beide sagen „Drück den Knopf“ – und ich mach‘ es.“ Und: „Wir alle haben den Impuls, ein Bild zu machen, wenn wir eine Kamera haben und alles was ich gemacht habe, ist zu lernen, dem nicht entgegenzustehen. Jedes Mal, wenn mein Finger den Auslöser drücken will – warum auch immer – frage ich nicht. Ich mach‘ es.“

Er sagt das mit so viel Energie und Überzeugung – es ist ansteckend. Mach‘ es einfach, sei mutig, frage später, verpasse keinen Moment. Zumal wir zu 99 Prozent sowieso digital fotografieren und alles wieder gelöscht werden kann.

Mach’ erst das Foto, frag später

Ich bin ein großer Zögerer, als Fotograf und überhaupt im Leben. Dadurch habe ich viele Chancen und Erfahrungen verpasst. Also will ich dringend üben, den „Zöger- und -Nachdenk- Reflex“ mit einem neuen „Vertrau- deinem- Instinkt- und – mach- es-Reflex“ zu „überschreiben“. Als Fotograf und auch in anderen Bereichen im Leben.

Fotograf Steve Simon sagt: „Ich schieße erst das Foto und stelle Fragen später.“ Und: „Wenn du dir Zeit nimmst nachzudenken, dann verpasst du den Moment. Also solltest du deinen Instinkten vertrauen und abdrücken und einfach das Beste hoffen.“ Wird das Foto gut werden? Die Sache ist: Du wirst es nie wissen, wenn du es nicht versuchst.

How to catch the moment Marylin Monroe Documentary photography Nadine Wilmanns

The-Ordinary-Project (and being grateful)

the ordinary Monstera plants Nadine Wilmanns photography

The-Ordinary-Project

(and being grateful)

The other week I wrote about the importance of having a defined personal project going as a photographer. (www.nadinewilmanns.com/self-assignment). Having written about it, of course I have been thinking what project I could focus on, but I couldn’t quite come up with something that would get me excited. While looking through older photos, I realized that I really value the pictures of very ordinary, everyday stuff .

Anyway, I found this could be a good project for me – given the current issue of social distancing. After all, the most important thing is just to start with something, anything really.

… what I take for granted

Focusing on the ordinary might as well help with something else I often struggle with: being grateful for basic things. Like breathing or a warm shower or breakfast. I tend to wish for more like a holiday at the seaside. Which isn`t very smart because too much discontent isn`t healthy. The other day I`ve read in the book ‘Living beyond your Feelings’ by Joice Meier about a brain scientist who states: “…. The toxic (negative) thoughts (…) will affect your entire body. They form a different type of chemical (in your brain) than a positive one does.” WTF!

That said, I`ve heard about the importance of gratitude and positive thoughts 1000 times and it makes sense to me. Yet, I often find it hard to feel true gratitude for stuff that I see and have every day and that I have learned to take for granted. Focusing more on them as a photographer and in a creative way might help me to literally “see the everyday in a new light”. Maybe you fancy trying the same? – Feel free to join the club; -)

Projekt "Gewöhnlich"

(und dankbar sein)

Vor ein paar Wochen habe ich darüber geschrieben, wie wichtig es als Fotograf ist, ein definiertes persönliches Projekt zu haben. (www.nadinewilmanns.com/self-assignment). Natürlich habe ich mir überlegt, welches Projekt ich starten könnte, kam aber irgendwie auf nichts Interessantes. Als ich durch alte Fotos geschaut habe, ist mir klar geworden, dass ich Bilder vom ganz Gewöhnlichen, Alltäglichen besonders mag. 

Jedenfalls dachte ich jetzt, das wäre eigentlich ein gutes Projekt für mich – zumal ich mit dem Corona-Abstand zur Zeit sowieso eingeschränkt bin. Und schließlich ist es das Wichtigste, einfach mal mit etwas, irgendetwas, zu beginnen.

“Selbstverständlichkeiten”…

Auf Gewöhnliches zu achten könnte außerdem bei etwas anderem helfen, mit dem ich oft Probleme habe: Dankbar sein für „normale“ Dinge. Sowas wie Atmen oder eine warme Dusche oder Frühstück. Ich will oft mehr, zum Beispiel ein Urlaub am Meer. Was nicht sehr klug ist, denn Unzufriedenheit ist ungesund. Neulich habe ich in einem Buch („Living beyond your Feelings“ by Joyce Meier) ein Zitat einer Gehirnforscherin gelesen: „… Die giftigen (negativen) Gedanken (…) haben Einfluss auf deinen ganzen Körper. Sie bilden andere chemische Stoffe (in deinem Gehirn) als positive Gedanken.“ WTF!

Andererseits habe ich schon 1000-mal gehört, wie wichtig Dankbarkeit und positive Gedanken sind und das macht für mich auch Sinn. Trotzdem finde ich es oft schwer, echte Dankbarkeit für Dinge zu fühlen, die ich jeden Tag sehe und habe. Es könnte also helfen, mich diesen „Selbstverständlichkeiten“ mehr und mit ein bisschen Kreativität zuzuwenden. Damit ich sie buchstäblich „in einem anderen Licht“ sehe… Vielleicht hast du Lust, das auch auszuprobieren ; -)

self-assignments The Ordinary Outfit Selfie Nadine Wilmanns photography

The Ordinary

The ordinary Light photography Light on white table cloth

The Ordinary

Lately, I`m reading a novel with the two main characters having a sabbatical traveling and exploring and I’m feeling such a wanderlust. It`s like a craving, like a thirst, only more somewhere towards the chest and stomach area. Longing for something out of the ordinary. Somehow, I strangely like this kind of intense aching for something. But often it gives me severe “fomo” (= fear of missing out;-)

the ordinary pair Nadine Wilmanns photography

The Ordinary - the typical Everyday

I`ve also recently started organizing my photo-chaos in Lightroom. While sorting through my old photographs, I`ve found something interesting: It`s often the pictures of the ordinary that I`m most happy about. Of course, there are shitloads of holiday pictures and I love them, too. But the most precious photos are those of everyday stuff. Those which document the character of a certain period of my life. Those that show something I don`t regularly do anymore because times have changed.

the ordinary broken glasses Nadine Wilmanns photography

The clothes I used to wear or what I used to eat. What habits I used to have. The regular Supermarket visits with my friends on the way home after a uni day. My grans’ glasses next to her sewing machine. The legwarmers and tennis skirt combo I loved to wear. Traveling home from work, regular coffee shop, yoga studio, the evening sun in the kitchen, watering plants, going church, walking the dog round the block, wearing my favourite pullover,…

Time capsules

Pictures of these everyday things are little time capsules. When being disheartened about a very ordinary day, I want to remind myself: What is normal for me now might not be part of my life any more one day. I might move house, friends might move, I might work differently, my taste might change or my habits. One day I might think: “I wish I had appreciated these things more when I still had the chance.”

While I still have my longing for something different inside me, I do want to document and not miss the everyday of my life as it is now. I want to remind myself: where I am at the moment there is some sort of beauty, too.

Das Gewöhnliche

Gerade lese ich ein Buch, in dem die beiden Hauptpersonen ein Jahr Pause von ihrem Alltag machen und jeweils auf Entdeckungsreisen gehen. Und ich bekomme riesiges Fernweh, das sich wie Durst anfühlt, nur eher in Brust- und Magengegend. Irgendwie mag ich dieses Sehnsuchtsgefühl. Aber oft macht es mir auch „fomo“, „fear of missing out“, also die Angst, etwas zu verpassen.

the ordinary home documentary

Typisch Alltag

Vor ein paar Tagen habe ich endlich mal damit angefangen, mein Foto-Chaos in Lightroom aufzuräumen. Als ich meine alten Fotos sortiert habe, habe ich etwas Interessantes bemerkt: Oft freue ich mich am meisten über die Fotos von ganz gewöhnlichen Momenten. Natürlich habe ich auch ganz viele Urlaubsbilder und ich liebe die auch. Aber am wertvollsten sind mir die Bilder von alltäglichen Dingen. Solche, die typisch sind für eine Zeit in meinem Leben und die jetzt nicht mehr zu meinem Alltag gehören, weil sich die Zeit einfach geändert hat.

Planting the ordinary

Die Kleider, die ich anhatte, was ich gegessen habe, oder welche Gewohnheiten ich hatte. Regelmäßige Supermarkt-Abstecher mit meinen Freundinnen auf dem Nachhauseweg von der Hochschule. Die Brille meiner Oma neben ihrer Nähmaschine. Die Stulpen – Tennisröckchen- Kombi, die ich geliebt habe. Zur Arbeit pendeln, Stammcafé, Yogastudio, die Nachmittagssonne in der Küche, Blumen gießen, Kirche gehen, Hundespaziergang um den Block, meinen Lieblingspulli,…

Zeitkapseln

Bilder von diesen alltäglichen Sachen sind wie kleine Zeitkapseln. Wenn ich genervt von einem allzu gewöhnlichen Tag bin, will ich mich daran erinnern: Was jetzt für mich normal ist, wird vielleicht mal nicht mehr Teil meines Lebens sein. Kann sein, dass ich umziehe, dass Freunde wegziehen, dass ich anders arbeite, dass sich mein Geschmack oder meine Gewohnheiten ändern. Eines Tages werde ich denken: „Ich wünschte, ich hätte diese Dinge mehr geschätzt, als ich noch die Möglichkeit dazu hatte.“  

Ich habe nach wie vor Fernweh in mir, aber ich will auch dokumentieren – und nicht verpassen – was gerade in meinem alltäglichen Leben vor sich geht. Mich erinnern, dass da wo ich gerade bin, auch eine Art von Schönheit zu finden ist.

How to not give up

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking

How not to give up

A lot has been said and written about not giving up. That shows just how important it is. The other day, I`ve watched a video about the photographer Joel Grimes and what he said was: The big majority of all photography graduates don`t actually work as photographers, because they have given up too early. Talent is nice, but what really makes a person successful, is refusing to give up despite setbacks. Success means coming back over and over again.

Keep the faith up

My mum is a songwriter and has just published her first CD after years and years of trying to find the right people for the project. She`s heard a lot of “No”s on the way. And I would imagine that it hurt because the more personal the project is and the more passion you put into it, the more it hurts when it`s being rejected. However, she didn`t allow these “No”s to steal her joy and faith in what she was doing. Instead, she kept on trying and just did not give up – and eventually, it finally happened – the album is out: www.dorothewilmanns.de. “When disappointed, get reappointed”, says the famous preacher Joyce Meyer. The challenge is to keep the faith up, that something good will come up eventually. 

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking a step - courage and massive action

The Challenge: The more rejections, the more we have tried.

I tended to be a quitter because I get discouraged easily if I`m not careful. Plus, I often take rejection personal. But I do want to challenge myself to get right back on track over and over again. I just remembered a true story that my former coach Hans Schumann has told me: A teacher (I think it was a sales teacher) gave his students the task to get as many rejections as possible in one week – the one with the most rejections would win.

His point was: Setbacks and rejections are normal and hearing many “No”s just means that we have tried a lot. Seeing it as a challenge, almost kind of a sport, might help us to get right back out and ask again. By getting used to this habit, we might not even dread the “No”s so much anymore. Instead, we might pat ourselves on the shoulder and say: “Well done, tried again – off to the next one.”

Wie man nicht aufgibt

Man hört so viel darüber: „Gib nicht auf!“. Das zeigt, wie wichtig es ist. Neulich habe ich mir ein Video über den Fotografen Joel Grimes angeschaut und er sagte, dass die große Mehrheit der Leute, die Fotografie studiert haben, nicht als Fotografen arbeiten, weil sie zu früh aufgegeben haben. Talent ist schön, aber erfolgreich sind die, die sich trotz Rückschläge weigern, aufzugeben.

Durchhalten

Meine Mutter ist Songwriterin und hat gerade ihre erste CD veröffentlicht – nachdem sie viele Jahre lang nach den richtigen Leuten für das Projekt gesucht hat und dabei viele „Neins“ einstecken musste. Und ich kann mir vorstellen, dass das hart war. Denn je persönlicher ein Projekt ist und je mehr Begeisterung man reinsteckt, desto mehr trifft es einen, wenn es auf Ablehnung stößt. Aber sie hat sich die Freude nicht nehmen und sich nicht entmutigen lassen, sondern hat immer weitergemacht und nicht aufgegeben – und jetzt hat es geklappt, die CD ist da – www.dorothewilmanns.de. “When disappointed, get reappointed”, sagt die bekannte Predigerin Joyce Meyer, was so viel heißt wie: Wenn du enttäuscht bist, mach direkt einen neuen Plan. Die Herausforderung ist, weiter fest daran zu glauben, dass gute Dinge auf uns warten. 

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking a step- courage and massive action

Wenn wir viele Absagen bekommen, heißt das, dass wir viel versucht haben.

Ich tendiere dazu, zu schnell aufzugeben, weil ich mich leicht entmutigen lasse, wenn ich nicht aufpasse. Und ich nehme „Neins“ oft persönlich. Aber ich will mich selbst dazu herausfordern, mich nicht beirren zu lassen und einfach immer wieder weiterzumachen. Gerade ist mir noch was eingefallen, das mir mein ehemaliger Coach Hans Schumann erzählt hat: Ein Lehrer, der Vertreter ausgebildet hat, hat seinen Schülern die Aufgabe gegeben in einer Woche so viele „Neins“ wie möglich zu sammeln – der, der die meisten hat, gewinnt.

Was er damit sagen wollte: Rückschläge und Absagen sind ganz normal. Und wenn wir viele davon bekommen, dann heißt das nur, dass wir viel versucht haben. Wenn wir es als Herausforderung sehen, oder fast schon als eine Art Sport, dann könnte uns das helfen, gleich wieder weiterzumachen und weiter zu fragen. Durch dieses “Training” macht es uns vielleicht bald auch nicht mehr viel aus, „Neins“ zu hören. Stattdessen könnten wir uns auf die Schulter klopfen und uns loben. „Sehr gut gemacht, wieder was versucht – und auf zum Nächsten.“

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking

In your style

in your style light on coffee shop chairs light photography

In your style

There is so much to say about having a personal style as a photographer and I`m not even entirely sure if I have a very distinctive one yet. However, there is something that I heard today, which relates to the style thing. And I really want to keep this in my head and my heart:

It`s something that actor Bryan Cranson said about auditions. And that basically goes for every job interview in the creative industry:

“You’re not going there to get a job.  You’re going there to present what you do. There it is – and walk away… And there is power in that.  There’s confidence in that, and it’s also saying ‘I can only do so much’…”

I think this could be a key to actually like what I HAVE to do because it`s a job: Not trying to be like some other photographer in order to please people’s expectations. But having a mindset of faith and doing and presenting what is true to myself. And accept that some might not like it and maybe hire someone else. It`s better for me not to have the job if otherwise, I would lose the love and the drive for what I`m doing.

...a job that I enjoy

Much easier said than done though as it takes some courage and confidence. But really, everyone`s taste is different anyway and so is everyone’s vision. Having faith, deciding to act on it, and sticking to this decision might be what makes all the difference between a job and a job that I enjoy.

More about personal style is in the video “Finding your Style” by John Keatley on lynda.com -unfortunately it`s members only.

In deinem Stil

Es gibt so viel darüber zu sagen, als Fotograf einen persönlichen Stil zu haben – und ich bin mir noch nicht mal sicher, ob ich einen sehr ausgeprägten Stil habe. Aber heute habe ich etwas gehört, das mit der Stil-Sache zu tun hat, und das wirklich in meinem Kopf und in meinem Herzen verankern möchte:

Es ist etwas, das der Schauspieler Bryan Cranson über das Vorsprechen bei Auditions gesagt hat. Das gilt eigentlich in jedem Vorstellungsgespräch für einen kreativen Job:

„Du gehst da nicht hin, um den Job zu bekommen. Du gehst hin, um deine Arbeit zu präsentieren. Hier ist sie – und du gehst wieder… Und darin ist Stärke. Darin ist Selbstvertrauen und es sagt auch ,Ich kann nur so viel machen‘…“

Das könnte ein Schlüssel sein, um wirklich zu mögen was ich tun MUSS, weil es ein Job ist. Nicht versuchen, so zu sein, wie ein anderer Fotograf, um irgendwelchen Erwartungen gerecht zu werden. Sondern eine Haltung des Glaubens und des Vertrauens haben. Das tun und zeigen, was mir und meinem Stil entspricht. Und akzeptieren, dass es einige nicht mögen werden und vielleicht jemand anderen engagieren werden. Es ist besser für mich, den Job nicht zu haben, wenn ich sonst die Liebe und die Motivation für das was ich tue verlieren würde.

...einen Job, den ich mag

Das ist natürlich viel leichter gesagt als getan, weil man Mut und Selbstvertrauen dafür braucht. Aber mal ehrlich, es hat sowieso jeder einen anderen Geschmack und genauso hat auch jeder einen anderen Blick. Glauben und Vertrauen zu haben, mich dazu zu entscheiden entsprechend zu handeln und mich an diesen Entschluss zu halten, könnte den Unterschied machen zwischen einem Job und einem Job den ich mag.

Mehr zum persönlichen Stil gibt es im Video “Finding your Style” von John Keatley auf lynda.com – da muss man nur leider Mitglied sein. 

In the Mirror

Mirror Selfie Fashion memories t-Shirt Darling in mirror

In the mirror

I love a good mirror selfie. The reflection gives the picture some sort of depth and context, a special atmosphere, and an extra portion of meaning. I can blur a bit, I can hide a bit, yet I still have evidence of myself in that very moment.

Mirror selfies offer the chance to include myself in the scene. When I`m out with friends it`s become almost like a reflex to take a mirror selfie of us when seeing our reflection in a shop window.   

"....this is my life, and everything is changing."

While experimenting with mirror portraits we might as well find out aspects about ourselves, that we haven`t seen before. And at the same time learn to appreciate ourselves a bit more. Selfies can be a way of exploring our very individual beauty. Of valuing ourselves in a certain moment of our little life.

Stephanie Calabrese Roberts writes in her book “Lens on Life”: “…you can look at yourself and say ‘Yes, my hair is not perfect in that picture or I don`t look exactly as I thought I would look.  But that`s me and this is my life, and everything is changing. Tomorrow I`m going to look a different way. Some day I`m going to die and my body won`t be here at all.’ I think self-portraiture helps you grow your self-acceptance so you can desensitize yourself to that judgement.”

Im Spiegel

Ich liebe ein gutes Spiegel-Selfie.  Die Spiegelung gibt dem Bild eine besondere Tiefe und einen Bezug zur Umgebung. Das Bild bekommt eine spezielle Atmosphäre und eine Extraportion Bedeutung. Ich kann ein bisschen verschwimmen, mich ein bisschen verstecken und trotzdem habe ich eine Spur von mir in dem Moment.

Mit Spiegel-Selfies kann ich mich mit in eine Szene platzieren. Wenn ich mit Freunden unterwegs bin ist es schon fast zum Reflex geworden, ein Spiegel-Selfie von uns zu machen, wenn wir uns in einer Spiegelung eines Schaufensters sehen.

"...das ist mein Leben und alles verändert sich ständig."

Wenn wir mit Spiegel-Portraits experimentieren, könnten wir Aspekte an uns entdecken, die wir vorher gar nicht so wahrgenommen haben. Gleichzeitig können wir lernen, ein bisschen dankbarer für uns selbst zu sein. Mit Selfies können wir unsere individuelle Schönheit erkunden und uns in diesem Moment unseres kleinen Lebens schätzen.

Stephanie Calabrese Roberts schreibt in ihrem Buch „Lens on Life“: „…du kannst dich anschauen und sagen ‚Ja, meine Haare sind nicht perfekt auf dem Bild oder ich sehe nicht genau so aus wie ich gedacht habe. Aber das bin ich und das ist mein Leben und alles verändert sich ständig. Morgen werde ich ein bisschen anders aussehen. Eines Tages werde ich sterben und mein Körper wird gar nicht mehr hier sein.‘ Ich denke Selbstportraits helfen dir dabei, Selbstakzeptanz zu entwickeln, so dass du unempfindlicher wirst gegenüber Werturteilen.“

How to remember

rain in sun How to remember Nadine Wilmanns photography

How to remember

Unfortunately, I have to admit, that my memory isn`t particularly good. The other day Richard and I were watching “The Truman Show” and I know that I`ve seen this film before. But honestly: I couldn`t really recall anything of it anymore. I`m like that with a lot of things that have happened; sometimes I have forgotten that certain events have taken place altogether. Photographs are of course good helpers with reviving lost memories. But the effect of photography goes way further than that.

Even if I have never seen the photograph itself: if I have taken a picture, an event is much more likely to stay in my memory. My first car boot sale: I had my film camera with me, loaded with a black-and-white film. The shop that was meant to develop the film, destroyed it. But the picture that I`ve taken, just after I found a Picard handbag for a fiver, is still in my head. In black and white, combined with the mood of that day.

Or if I have lost the photograph: Having just found my lost favorite necklace, I was sitting in the laundrette and sent a phone picture of me and the necklace to my friend. I have no idea if I still have that photo anywhere, I certainly have a different phone. But the picture of that very moment is still with me.

It`s becoming more difficult when a good moment happens, and the surroundings are unphotogenic. I don`t find it fun to take a picture (never mind keeping it) if I don`t like its look. Then I keep my eyes open for some detail (because there`s always something that`s kind of nice) and be it just my own feet. A picture of this can be like a stand-in for the moment. Like a souvenir- just for free.

Wie man sich erinnert

Leider musste ich schon oft feststellen, dass mein Gedächtnis nicht besonders gut ist. Richard und ich haben neulich „Die Truman Show“ geschaut und ich weiß, dass ich den Film schon mal gesehen habe. Aber ehrlich: ich hatte keine Ahnung mehr von irgendwas.  So geht es mir mit vielen Erlebnissen; von manchen habe ich sogar vergessen, dass ich sie überhaupt erlebt habe. Fotografien helfen natürlich dabei, solche Erinnerungen zurückzuholen. Aber der Foto-Effekt ist mehr als das.

Auch wenn ich das Foto selbst nie gesehen habe, bleibt ein Erlebnis eher in meinem Kopf, wenn ich ein Bild gemacht habe. Mein erster Flohmarkt: Ich hatte meine Filmkamera dabei und einen Schwarz-Weiß-Film drin. Aber das Fotostudio, das meinen Film entwickeln sollte, hat ihn kaputt gemacht. Das Bild, das ich gemacht habe, gerade als ich eine Picard-Handtasche für fünf Euro gefunden habe, habe ich trotzdem noch im Kopf. In schwarz-weiß, zusammen mit dem Gefühl des Tages.

Oder, wenn ich das Foto längst nicht mehr finde: Ich hatte gerade meine verlorene Lieblingskette wiedergefunden, sitze im Waschsalon und schicke meiner Freundin ein Handyfoto von der Kette um meinen Hals. Ich habe keine Ahnung, ob ich das Foto noch irgendwo habe, das Handy sicher nicht, aber das Bild von dem Moment ist noch bei mir.

Ein bisschen schwieriger wird es, wenn ein guter Moment in einer unfotogenen Umgebung passiert. Es macht mir keinen Spaß, ein Foto zu machen (oder zu behalten) wenn`s nicht gut aussieht. Dann schaue ich nach einem Detail (denn irgendwas ist immer schön) und sei es nur meine Füße. Ein Foto davon ist wie eine Art Platzhalter für den Moment an sich. Wie ein Souvenir – nur kostenlos.

How to remember Nadine Wilmanns photography

Self-Assignment

Self-Assignment. light on floor capture the 50:50

Self-Assignment

This week I`ve come to realize: in order to grow as a photographer it is very important to give myself an assignment for a personal project. Single strong photographs are all well and good. But a series of pictures can tell a much stronger, more complex story. Plus, personal projects contribute to a convincing body of work. They help with developing a unique style. And they challenge us to go out of our comfort zone.

Narrowing down the focus with a self-assignment

Of course, I constantly have the pursuit to document life. Or on a smaller scale document an event, a holiday, or a summer. However, I would benefit from a more specific self-assignment; from narrowing down my focus in order to gain more focus, if that makes sense.

And I would profit from taking on a more conceptual approach. Photographer Steve Simon recommends writing down a specific headline and description for each self-assigned project. “This can help clarify and focus your vision for a consistent point of view. It helps to form a framework for the project”, he says. “(It helps to) keep a tight thread around a theme, to make sure that all photos reflect that headline and to stay on point.”

The big question now is: what to self-assign?

Aufträge an sich selbst

Diese Woche ist mir klar geworden: Um mich als Fotografin weiter zu entwickeln, sollte ich mir selbst Aufträge für persönliche Projekte geben. Einzelne ausdrucksstarke Bilder sind schön und gut. Aber eine Bildserie kann eine viel überzeugendere, vielschichtigere Geschichte erzählen. Außerdem bilden persönliche Projekte einen guten Fundus an Arbeitsproben. Sie helfen dabei, einen einzigartigen Stil zu entwickeln. Und sie animieren uns dazu, uns aus unserer Komfortzone heraus zu bewegen.

Den Fokus einschränken

Natürlich bin ich ständig darauf aus, das Leben zu dokumentieren. Oder in einem kleineren Rahmen vielleicht eine Veranstaltung, einen Urlaub, oder einen Sommer. Allerdings würde es mir guttun, wenn ich mir spezifischere, präzisere „Aufträge“ erteilen würde. Wenn ich meinen Fokus einschränken würde, um mehr Fokus zu gewinnen.

Und ich würde davon profitieren, die Sache konzeptueller anzugehen. Fotograf Steve Simon empfiehlt, eine bestimmte Schlagzeile und eine Beschreibung für jedes selbst bestimmte Projekt zu notieren. „Das macht deinen Blick klarer. Es hilft dir, dich auf eine durchgängige Erzählung zu fokussieren und deinem Projekt einen Rahmen zu geben“, sagt er. „Sinnvoll ist, das Thema genau einzukreisen und sicherzustellen, dass alle Fotos des Projekts die Aussage der Schlagzeile treffen.“

Die große Frage ist jetzt: Was könnte ein Thema sein?

On embracing

on embracing Black and white photograph of girl with balloon

On embracing

“It´s always important to have a plan before you go out on a shot. That said, things are going to happen that is going to mess with your plan.” Today I have re-watched one of my favorite videos on Lynda.com about documentary photographer Paul Taggart documenting his brother and his family.

When I have a plan, but things don`t work out accordingly, I often get caught up in worries. I get nervous and grumpy inside. Afterwards, I wish I would have worked with the situation in confidence. Because thinking: ‘Oh shit, it`s not gonna work out, obsessing about bad light or weather and giving up early – all that keeps me from really focussing on what`s happening in front of me. I know from experience that when I just keep “working it” and don`t give up, I usually get good results. But I tend to forget.

Embracing real life

“Rather than worrying about not getting the picture that I wanted, I just run with the moment”, says Paul Taggart. Because that`s “real life” happening. After all, that’s what photography is all about: documenting something genuine and real, picturing true and authentic moments.

Paul Taggart says: “All those obstacles are just going to make it better in the end. As long as you embrace them, you`re going to come out with some better pictures.”

So, when things don`t go to plan, I really want to remember:  if I embrace and work with the situation as it is, there`s going to be a good picture. I guess that goes for all life – trust in God that he will lead all things with higher knowledge. And on a smaller scale of photography: Trust that all happenings, all light or weather or stuff will eventually be my blessing. And that with some creative thinking (not blocked by worries), I`ll find a way to make something more genuine and authentic than I had planned in the first place.

Vom Annehmen

“Es ist wichtig, Plan zu haben, wenn man für ein Fotoshooting raus geht. Andererseits werden Dinge passieren, die deinen Plan durcheinanderbringen werden.“ Heute habe ich eines meiner Lieblingsvideos auf www.lynda.com angeschaut, in dem Dokumentarfotograf Paul Taggart einige Tage im Alltag seines Bruders und dessen Familie dokumentiert.

Wenn ich einen Plan habe, aber die Dinge nicht so laufen, wie ich`s mir vorgestellt habe, werde ich oft schnell innerlich unruhig und unzufrieden. Hinterher wünschte ich mir jedes mal, ich hätte mehr Vertrauen in mich gehabt, die Situation gut zu meistern. Denn zu denken ‚Ach Shit, es läuft nicht‘ und mich wegen schlechtem Licht oder Wetter verrückt zu machen und zu früh aufzugeben – all das hält mich davon ab, mich wirklich auf das zu konzentrieren, was ich gerade vor mir habe. Ich weiß eigentlich: wenn ich dranbleibe, verschiedene Dinge ausprobiere und nicht aufgebe, bekomme ich meistens auch gute Ergebnisse. Nur vergesse ich das immer wieder.

Das wahre Leben...

“Anstatt mich darüber zu ärgern, dass ich nicht die Bilder bekomme, die ich wollte, gehe ich einfach mit dem Moment mit”, sagt Paul Taggart.  Denn das ist das “echte Leben“ und darum geht es schließlich beim Fotografieren: Etwas Echtes und „Wahres“ zu festzuhalten, ehrliche und authentische Momente zu dokumentieren.

Paul Taggart sagt: „Alle diese Hindernisse werden deine Bilder am Ende nur besser machen. Solange du sie Willkommen heißt, wirst du mit besseren Fotos nach Hause gehen.“

Wenn`s mal wieder nicht läuft, will ich versuchen dran zu denken: wenn ich der Situation vertraue und mit ihr arbeite, dann wird da auch ein gutes Bild sein. Ich denke, das gilt im Leben generell  – Gott vertrauen, dass er die Dinge mit seinem höheren Wissen gut für uns laufen lässt. Und beim Fotoshooting: Vertrauen, dass alles, was passiert, Licht, Wetter, was auch immer, am Ende ein Segen für mich ist. Und dass mit kreativem Nachdenken (und ohne Ärger im Kopf) etwas Ehrlicheres und Authentischeres dabei rauskommt, als ich vielleicht erwartet hatte.

How to get the feeling into the picture

feeling into the picture light photography light on plant

How to get the feeling into the picture

THE most important element in a photo is emotion; that it makes me feel something. A technically perfect picture doesn`t mean much to me, if I don`t feel anything when looking at it. “A good photograph is one that communicates a fact, touches the heart and leaves the viewer a changed person for having seen it”, said photographer Irving Penn.

Picturing emotion is not so much related to technique or camera equipment. It`s much more complex and has something to do with our own personality. And it isn`t received by all viewers in the same way.

The light is a major factor for emotion. Good light almost always creates atmosphere. For example, I try to look out for light and photograph just that – regardless what else is in the frame, and I`m often surprised about the magic happening just by the light.

A second element is the photographers‘ personality. It`s influenced by memories. Those that we actually remember and those that are subconsciously with us and that we can`t recollect any more.  „Many of your best images will come from people, experiences and places that feel familiar to you in some way because they connect you with the past”, writes Stephanie Calabrese Roberts in “Lens on Life”.

Pictures in our heads

Therefore, everyone has a one-of-a-kind view of the world. Because everyone has his very own memories. Which is a good thing, as therefore each style is unique, too. We all have our own personal pictures in our heads, which we have captured and stored without a camera, but with our eyes only.

Slide with old photo feeling into the picture

 A few friends of mine have an amazing eye and sometimes I have wished to have their eye. But that`s rubbish because every perspective is a personal one and photography as well is always something very personal. And back to the emotion: I think, the best chance to get some feeling in a picture is (apart from the light) to FEEL something as a photographer while taking the shot. To emotionally connect with what`s in front of the camera. If I had seen, what my friend has seen, I most likely would not have had the same connection as she has had. Because her memories are entirely different from mine. And I then wouldn´t have been able to deliver the same emotion in the picture.

That encourages us once again to truly be ourselves. Trusting, that our perspective is one-of-a-kind and that this shines through in our photographs. Being authentic allows us to communicate genuine emotion with our photography.

Gefühl ins Bild

Das Allerwichtigste bei einem Foto ist für mich, dass es bei mir ein Gefühl hinterlässt. Ein technisch perfektes Bild bringt mir gar nichts, wenn ich nichts dabei fühle, wenn ich es anschaue. “Ein gutes Foto kommuniziert eine Tatsache, berührt das Herz und lässt den Betrachter, da er es gesehen hat, als veränderte Person zurück”, hat der Fotograf Irving Penn gesagt.

Gefühl in ein Foto zu kriegen, hängt nicht so sehr viel mit Kamera-Ausrüstung und Technik zusammen. Das ist viel komplexer und hat was mit der eigenen Persönlichkeit zu tun. Und es kommt auch nicht bei jedem Betrachter das gleiche an.

Das Licht ist ein wichtiger Gefühlsfaktor. Gutes Licht macht eigentlich immer Atmosphäre. Ich versuche immer nach Licht Ausschau zu halten und nur das Licht – ganz unabhängig von dem was da noch auf dem Foto ist – zu fotografieren. Ich bin immer wieder überrascht, was für einen Zauber das Licht macht.

Ein zweiter Faktor ist die eigene Persönlichkeit. Da spielen die eigenen Erinnerungen mit rein. Solche, die uns bewusst sind und solche, die in unserem Unterbewusstsein da sind und an die wir uns gar nicht mehr richtig erinnern. „Viele unserer besten Fotos entstehen mit Menschen, bei Erlebnissen und an Orten, die uns vertraut vorkommen, weil sie uns mit unserer Vergangenheit verbinden”, schreibt Stephanie Calabrese Roberts in “Lens on Life”.

Die Bilder in unserem Kopf

Deswegen sieht jeder anders. Denn jeder hat ja andere Erinnerungen.  Was gut ist, denn so ist jeder Stil einzigartig. Wir alle haben Bilder in unseren Köpfen, die wir im Laufe unseres Lebens ohne Kamera, nur mit den Augen festgehalten und abgespeichert haben – und die einzigartig sind.

Slide with old photo feeling into the picture

Einige meiner Freundinnen haben ein unglaublich gutes Auge und manchmal habe ich mir gewünscht, ich hätte deren Blick. Aber das wäre Quatsch, denn jede Perspektive ist eine Persönliche. Und Fotografie ist auch immer etwas Persönliches. Und jetzt wieder zum Gefühl: Ich denke, die beste Möglichkeit, außer dem Licht, Gefühl ins Foto zu bringen, ist, wenn man als Fotograf beim Fotografieren etwas fühlt. Wenn man sich emotional mit dem, was vor der Kamera ist, verbinden kann. Hätte ich gesehen, was meine Freundin gesehen hat, hätte ich wahrscheinlich nicht die gleiche Verbindung gehabt wie sie, da sie ja ganz andere Erinnerungen hat als ich. Und ich hätte dann auch nicht das gleiche Gefühl im Bild vermitteln können.

Das ermutigt mal wieder, wirklich uns selbst zu sein. Darauf zu vertrauen, dass unser Blick besonders ist und das in unseren Bildern durchscheint. Denn als unser authentisches und einzigartiges Selbst haben wir die Chance echtes Gefühl in unsere Bilder bringen.

Read more: 

Home-Photography