Ellie draws

Ellie draws - How to turn your hobby into your business

In conversation with illustrator Ellie Smith

When I first saw Ellie Smiths’ drawings on Instagram, it made me want to pick up a pen to draw something myself – her work is such an art appetizer! About two years ago, Ellie set up her side hustle business as an illustrator taking commissions on house portraits and other drawings. She also sells her prints online and on markets. Her style is quite exceptional – mostly fine liner, slightly wonky lines, and angles, mainly featuring objects, nature, houses, pubs, football stadiums, …. For this Blog-Interview, I met Ellie in “The Bow Bells” pub in East London. She shows me her sketchbooks and I cannot believe they really are sketchbooks as they are so neat and beautiful and without a single crease or gone wrong drawing. She assures me though that this is how she sketches.

You started sharing and offering your work on Instagram right after the first Lockdown – was the free time the reason to start?

Actually, I had already handed in my notice at my old job as an art teacher end of February 2020 before we knew anything about the pandemic. Part of that was to do more drawing. And then the pandemic hit, and I used the time wisely and drew and drew and drew – I can`t believe it`s only 2 years since I`ve really been pushing it. Since I`ve got my new job, I just carried on and made sure I dedicate enough time.

 “I thought about what it would be like if I got to the end of my life, and I looked back and I didn`t do anything with my art.”

Artist Ellie with sketch book in East London

Interesting! I sometimes hear from professional creatives that they kind of slipped into their career by chance. However, you seemed to have deliberately worked and pushed towards where you are now as an artist, and you have purposefully taken all these steps - including leaving your old job - for this to become a reality …

Yes! Hardly I look back, and I don`t regret having had a job that was as stressful as it was, but I feel like I couldn`t have gone much longer and I couldn`t have not done my artwork. I thought about what it would be like if I got to the end of my life, and I looked back and I didn`t do anything with my art. And I love my work and people tell me that they love it, too. So, it would have been such a waste and I just had to do it.

This is great - you really trusted your art then? Were you not afraid of the risk involved in quitting a safe employment?

Well, I think I was just really keen to get out of my job. And I knew that there is the opportunity to do supply teaching if needed to get by. But I really wanted to see what happens. It does feel a bit crazy now.

In hindsight what would you advice yourself?

I`m glad I did it and at the time I felt like I don`t have much choice – like when you`re just so on the edge of something that you have to just jump. You don`t do that if you feel secure because it would feel like so much to give up. I still think I`ve ended up in the safe option though after all because I took a full-time job again.

How is that going then?

I didn`t want to go full time again, but this school I`m now working for, looked for someone to come in full-time. This new job allows me much more time than my old one though, and I can juggle my time much better.

Ellie draws portrait in East London

Do you hope that at some point you can give up having a day job completely and just do your art?

I don`t know. I think I did hope that, and maybe one day I will be part-time. But it`s not a plan right now.

One of the downsides of turning your hobby into your profession is that it can start to feel more like an obligation at times, and not just something you enjoy doing...

That can be a juggling act. I want to draw and sketch more new things, but then my graphic design head goes on – I`ve worked as a graphic designer doing greeting cards before – and thinks: What`s actually a commercial-looking print? What`s gonna sell? That`s why it`s really great to do house portraits. Because I love drawing houses and architecture and the commissions are often gorgeous Victorian cottages and I get to draw afresh – I get to do what I love AND do something new. Also, I love drawing moments – like this lifestyle scene of the mayonnaise and the chips on this table…or recently I`ve seen a scene of all the washing up stuck by the sink on the last page of a cookbook – such an evocative scene, just one of these moments… – and I think that`s what I want to draw more.

How did you find your drawing style?

My tutor at uni sent me off to the countryside around Leeds to draw so that I would find my signature style.  I went to draw sheep and leaves and stuff, and he said: “Right, that`s it – whatever it felt like to draw that, is what you need to feel when you draw.”

Light and shadow portrait of girl

“I have always loved my own work and I always enjoyed doing it. But I think I`ve not always believed that it could go anywhere – and it is such a privilege that people want my work.”

In one of your very early Instagram posts right after the start of the lockdown, you write something like “I`ve done terribly at drawing ….” – only that your drawings didn`t look terrible at all. Is that a sign of the infamous imposter syndrome?

What I might have meant is that I`ve beaten myself up over not having been drawing enough because my old job just took over my life and I`ve gotten out of practice. I have always loved my own work and I always enjoyed doing it. But I think I`ve not always believed that it could go anywhere – and it is such a privilege that people want my work. That has definitely grown my confidence because there is enough evidence that people like my work.

Lovely! Do you currently have any challenges at all?

The things that get me down now and then, are how much work it is to post on Instagram or to do the artworks. I do markets and if they don`t go well, that`s my Saturday, my day off, taken up not selling stuff. There are slow months and that`s sometimes frustrating. If I was full-time, I would have more time for sharing and promoting. But then I remind myself that I chose this balance for me to have a salary that`s secure.

Your prices for your prints are very affordable – I mean you can sell art for 10 pounds, but also for 1000 pounds or more…

If you charge a really high price it`s great if you sell one piece of artwork. But I enjoy selling. I enjoy the feeling. So, I don`t want to put my prices up high. My commissioned work does cost more though because I feel this is taking me quite a bit of time and it takes quite some expertise – so I`m happy with the price of that.

Ellie draws in London

How long roughly does it take you to do one house portrait?

I`m not exactly sure in hours as I do it in bits after work, but I can turn around a house portrait in a two-week period and that includes taking it to the printer and getting it back. But that`s given that it`s not too complicated and that I`ve got no other commissioned work.

What`s your work process?

Ideally, the house owners send me a photo of their house. My pens vary in thickness and I`ve got two that are my favourites. What I use has come from experimenting and also observing how other people work and then trying it myself to see if it`s my kind of thing or not. I scan or photograph the drawing and in Photoshop I separate the black line on a white background. If it`s going to have colour each one has a layer so that I can edit or delete them separately. It can become a bit complex at times.

Do you draw every day?

It`s not a daily discipline but I do draw a couple of  times a week at least. And I try to get in the habit of having a sketch book in my bag for when I`m sitting in a pub or waiting for someone.

What were your most important learning experiences as a professional artist?

If you`ve got a product that you want to launch on a certain date, then you build up to it. But don`t build up meaning “sell, sell, sell”, but instead tell stories about your life, about your work process – people love this kind of back story. And then when you come to selling, they trust you. I`m the same: I love following artists because I love to see what they`re up to and then when I want something, I think `Oh they`re good I`ll buy from them! ` Also: trying to stick to one thing at a time. Right now, I have a sale and I was going to post something else on my Instagram, but I thought: `No, stick to one theme, make people follow that link to my page, and don`t bamboozle them with too much.’

You can find Ellies work on her online shop at www.elliesmithillustration.square.site. Here you can also find her house portrait offer, and her latest bespoke map illustrations.

Prints are also available on Etsy at www.elliedraws.etsy.com

Infos about her upcoming markets are on www.pedddle.com/stalls/ellie-smith-illustration.

Her Instagram Account is @elliedraws

Ellie malt - Wie du dein Hobby in dein Business verwandelst

Im Gespräch mit Ellie Smith ("Ellie draws") über ihren Beruf als Illustratorin

Als ich Ellie Smiths’ Zeichnungen auf Instagram entdeckt habe, hatte ich Lust, selbst einen Stift in die Hand zu nehmen und loszuzeichnen – ihre Arbeit macht so Appetit auf Zeichnen! Vor ungefähr zwei Jahren hat Ellie ihr Side Hustle Business als Illustratorin gestartet und fertigt seitdem unter anderem Haus-Protraits auf Kundenauftrag an. Außerdem bietet sie Prints online und auf Kunstmärkten an. Ihr Stil ist ziemlich außergewöhnlich – vor allem Fine Liner, leicht ungerade Linien und schiefe Winkel, Lieblingsmotive sind Haushaltsgegenstände, Natur, Häuser, Pubs, Fußballstadien,…

Für dieses Blog-Interview treffe ich Ellie im “The Bow Bells” Pub in East London. Sie zeigt mir ihre  Skizzenbücher und ich kann kaum fassen, dass das Skizzenbücher sein sollen, den sie sind so ordentlich und hübsch und ohne ein einziges Eselsohr oder missratene Zeichnung. Sie versichert mir aber, dass sie so ihre Skizzen macht.

Du hast kurz nach dem ersten Lockdown damit begonnen, deine Zeichnungen zu veröffentlichen und zum Kauf anzubieten – war die freie Zeit der Grund, warum du dein Kunst-Business gestartet hast?

Tatsächlich habe ich meine Kündigung für meinen alten Job als Kustlehrerin bereits Ende Februar 2020 eingereicht, als noch niemand etwas von der Pandemie geahnt hat. Ein Grund für meine Kündigung war mehr Zeit zum Zeichnen zu haben. Und dann kam die Pandemie und ich habe die Zeit gut genutzt, habe gemalt, gemalt, gemalt – ich kann kaum glauben, dass das erst zwei Jahre her ist, seitdem ich meine Kunst so richtig pushe. Seit ich meinen neuen Job habe, habe ich das beibehalten und sichergestellt, dass ich genügend Zeit dafür freimache.

Drawing of Ellie

Interessant! Manchmal höre ich von professionellen Kreativen, dass sie eher zufällig in ihre Karrieren reingerutscht sind… Du aber scheinst wirklich mit Plan und Vorsatz darauf hingearbeitet zu haben und bist bewusst diese Schritte gegangen, die deine Karriere als Illustratorin wahr werden ließen – inclusive der Kündigung deines alten Jobs…

Ja! Selten schaue ich zurück und ich bereue es nicht einen Job gehabt zu haben, der so stressig war, aber ich denke auch, dass ich es nicht viel länger ausgehalten hätte und ich hätte meine Kunst nicht einfach nicht tun können. Ich dachte, wie würde es sich anfühlen, wenn ich am Ende meines Leben zurückschaute und nichts aus meiner Kunst gemacht hätte. Und ich liebe meine Kunst und Leute bestätigen, dass sie sie auch lieben. Also, es wäre eine große Verschwendung gewesen und ich musste das einfach tun.

Das ist großartig – das heißt, du hast deiner Kunst wirklich vertraut? Hattest du keine Angst vor dem Risiko eine sichere Arbeitsstelle aufzugeben?

Also, ich denke ich wollte unbedingt aus meinem Job raus. Und ich wusste, dass ich zur Not immer noch als Vertretungskraft arbeiten kann, um über die Runden zu kommen. Aber ich wollte wirklich sehen was passiert. Es hört sich im Nachhinein ein bisschen verrückt an.

Was würdest du dir rückblickend raten?

Ich bin froh, dass ich`s gemacht habe und in dem Moment hat es sich so angefühlt, als hätte ich eine große Wahl – wie wenn du so an den Abrgrund gedrängt wirst, dass du springen musst. Du machst das nicht, wenn du dich sicher fühlst, dann würde zu viel auf dem Spiel stehen. Ich denke aber, ich bin immer noch in der Sicherheitszone gelandet, da ich ja dann doch wieder einen Vollzeit-Job angenommen habe.

Wie läuft`s damit?

Ich wollte eigentlich nicht wieder in Vollzeit arbeiten, aber diese Schule, für die ich jetzt arbeite, wollte eine Vollzeitkraft. In meinem neuen Job habe ich aber viel mehr Zeit als in meinem Alten und ich kann meine Zeit besser einteilen.  

Ich will mehr neue Dinge zeichnen und malen, aber dann schaltet sich mein Grafikdesign-Gehirn ein und denkt: Wie würde ein kommerzieller Print aussehen? Was wird sich gut verkaufen?

light and shadow portrait in East London

Hoffst du, eines Tages deinen Job als Lehrerin ganz aufgeben zu können um ausschließlich deine Kunst zu machen?

Ich weiß es nicht. Ich denke, ich habe das gehofft, und vielleicht werde ich eines Tages nur noch in Teilzeit arbeiten. Aber das ist im Moment nicht mein Plan.

Einer der Nachteile sein Hobby zum Beruf zu machen, ist, dass es sich manchmal wie eine Pflicht anfühlt - und nicht mehr wie etwas, das man gern macht…

Das kann ein Balanceakt sein. Ich will mehr neue Dinge zeichnen und malen, aber dann schaltet sich mein Grafikdesign-Gehirn ein – ich habe früher als Grafikdesignerin für Grußkarten gearbeitet – und denkt: Wie würde ein kommerzieller Print aussehen? Was wird sich gut verkaufen? Deswegen sind Haus-Portraits super. Denn ich liebe es, Häuser zu malen und Architektur. Die Aufträge sind oft traumhaft schöne Viktorianische Landhäuser und ich kann wieder mit einer neuen Zeichnung anfangen – ich kann etwas, das ich mag UND etwas Neues malen. Außerdem liebe ich es, Momente zu zeichnen – sowas wie diese Lifestyle Szene von der Mayo und den Pommes hier auf dem Tisch… Oder neulich habe ich auf der letzten Seite eines Kochbuchs eine Szene von der Spüle gesehen, auf der sich der Abwasch getürmt hat – so eine sinnträchtige Szene, eben einer dieser Momente, …  – und ich denke, das ist das, wovon ich mehr malen möchte.

Wie hast du deinen Malstil gefunden?

Mein Tutor an der Uni hat mich in die Landschaft rund um Leeds geschickt, um zu malen und meinen Stil zu finden. Ich ging also los, habe Schafe gezeichnet, Blätter und solche Dinge. Und er sagte: “Genau, das ist es – so wie es sich angefühlt hat, das zu malen, so sollte es sich immer anfühlen, wenn du malst.“

house in East London

“Ich liebe es, Häuser zu malen und Architektur. Die Aufträge sind oft traumhaft schöne Viktorianische Landhäuser und ich kann wieder mit einer neuen Zeichnung anfangen – ich kann etwas, das ich mag UND etwas Neues malen.”

In einem sehr alten Instagram Post gleich nach Beginn des Lockdowns schreibst du sowas wie “Ich war in letzter Zeit nicht gut darin, zu zeichnen…” – nur, dass deine Zeichnungen sehr gut ausgesehen haben. Sind das Anzichen des berüchtigten Imposter Syndroms, also Zweifel an deinem Können?

Kann sein, dass ich damit gemeint habe, dass ich ärgerlich darüber war, dass ich nicht genügend gezeichnet habe, weil mein alter Job mein Leben übernommen hat und ich daher außer Übung gekommen bin. Ich habe meine Zeichnungen immer geliebt und ich habe es immer geliebt, zu zeichnen. Aber ich denke, ich habe nicht immer daran geglaubt, dass ich es damit zu etwas bringen kann – und daher ist es für mich so ein großes Privileg, dass Leute meine Kunst möchten. Das hat mein Selbstvertrauen auf jeden Fall gestärkt, denn es gibt genügend Hinweise darauf, dass Leute meine Arbeit mögen.

Schön! Stehst du im Moment überhaupt noch vor irgendwelchen Herausforderungen?

Was mich ab und zu runterzieht, ist, wie viel Arbeit es ist, auf Instagram zu posten und die Kunstdrucke fertigzustellen. Ich nehme auch an Märkten teil und wenn die nicht gut laufen, dann ist mein Samstag, mein freier Tag, für nichts draufgegangen. Es gibt einfach weniger gute Monate und das ist manchmal frustrierend. Wenn ich all meine Kunst hauptberuflich machen würde, dann hätte ich mehr Zeit, meine Arbeit zu promoten. Aber dann erinnere ich mich selbst wieder daran, dass ich diese Balance für mich bewusst gewählt habe, um ein sicheres Einkommen zu haben.  

Die Preise für deine Prints sind sehr erschwinglich – ich meine, man kann Kunst für 10 Pfund verkaufen, aber eben auch für 1000 oder mehr….

Wenn man einen sehr hohen Verkaufspreis festsetzt, dann ist es schon toll, wenn man ein Kunstwerk verkauft. Aber ich mag gerne verkaufen, ich genieße das Gefühl. Daher will ich meine Preise nicht hoch setzen. Meine Auftragsarbeiten kosten allerdings mehr, weil sie doch einiges an Zeit brauchen und außerdem Expertise – daher finde ich den Preis angemessen.

” Was ich für die Bilder benutze hat sich durch viel Experimentieren ergeben und ich beobachte auch, wie andere Künstler arbeiten und probiere aus, ob davon was mein Ding sein könnte.”

East London steet portrait of Artist

Wie lange brauchst du ungefähr für ein Haus-Portrait?

Ich bin nicht so ganz sicher, was die Stundenzahl angeht, denn ich arbeite gestückelt nach der Arbeit, aber ich kann ein Haus-Portrait innerhalb von zwei Wochen fertigstellen – und das beinhaltet die Zeit, in der es beim Drucken ist. Aber das gilt, wenn es nicht zu kompliziert ist und ich gerade nicht noch an anderen Aufträge arbeite.

Wie ist dein Arbeitsprozess?

Idealerweise schicken mir die Hausbesitzer ein Foto ihres Hauses. Meine Stifte variieren je nach Dicke und ich habe zwei Lieblingsstifte. Was ich für die Bilder benutze hat sich durch viel Experimentieren ergeben und ich beobachte auch, wie andere Künstler arbeiten und probiere aus, ob davon was mein Ding sein könnte. Ich scanne oder fotografiere die Zeichnung ab und in Photoshop separiere ich die schwarze Linie vom weißen Hintergrund. Wenn es Farbe haben soll, bekommt jede Farbe eine eigene Ebene, damit ich sie jeweils getrennt bearbeiten oder löschen kann. Manchmal kann es ganz schön komplex werden.

Malst du jeden Tag?

Nicht zwingend täglich aber auf zumindest mehrmals die Woche. Und ich versuche mir anzugewöhnen, ein Skizzenbuch in meiner Tasche zu haben – für wenn ich mal im Pub bin, oder auf jemanden warte.  

Was waren deine bisher wichtigsten Lernerfahrungen als professionelle Künstlerin?

Wenn du ein Produkt hast, dass du an einem bestimmten Datum auf den Markt bringen möchtest, dann bereite dein Publikum darauf vor – aber es sollte erstmal nicht nur ums Verkaufen gehen. Sondern erzähl stattdessen Geschichten aus deinem Leben, aus deinem Arbeitsalltag – Leute lieben diese Hintergrundgeschichten. Und wenn es dann tatsächlich ums Verkaufen geht, vertrauen sie dir. Ich selbst bin genauso: Ich liebe es, Künstlern auf Instagram zu folgen, weil ich gerne verfolge, was sie gerade machen und wenn ich mal etwas haben möchte, dann denke ich ‚Ah, DIE sind gut, von denen kaufe ich.“  Außerdem versuche ich, an einer Sache dranzubleiben: Gerade habe ich einen Sale und ich wollte kurz was anderes auf Instagram posten, aber dann dachte ich: ‚Nein, bleib bei einem Thema, schicke die Leute auf den Link zum Sale und verwirre sie nicht mit zu vielen Verschiedenen Themen.‘

Ellies Zeichnungen findest du auf ihrer Homepage/in ihrem Online Shop auf www.elliesmithillustration.square.site. Hier kommst du auch zu ihrem Haus Portrait Angebot, und ihren neuesten Landkarten- Illustrationen.

Ihre Prints sind außerdem auf Etsy erhältlich: www.elliedraws.etsy.com

Infos darüber, auf welchen Märkten sie als nächstes vertreten ist, sind auf www.pedddle.com/stalls/ellie-smith-illustration.

Ihr Instagram Account ist @elliedraws

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

error: Content is protected