Fashion Storytelling

X fashion storytelling Fashion and Lifestyle Photography Portfolio Nadine Wilmanns

Fashion Storytelling

These days, a lot is talked about the future of fashion and how fashion companies can survive. A few months back I had an interesting interview with Prof. Dr. Jochen Strähle, head of the fashion and textile faculty at Reutlingen University. He says: „80 Million people will always need something to wear and there will always be demand for personal expression. Constant change is the very nature of fashion and creativity is rooted in change. If newness is perceived as a crisis then fashion has been in a crisis for the past hundred years.”

What struck me is, that he immediately referred to personal expression. And after all, that`s what fashion is about, and therein lies the opportunity for every designer and every brand.

For example, Michael Kors: Personally, I would rather stuff my things in the pockets of my jacket than using a bag with the MK logo on it. But there are others that are crazy about it. On Black Friday there are queues at the Michael Kors Outlet in Metzingen beginning far outside the store entrance. In fact, Michael Kors usually has the longest queue of all the outlets.

Not everybodys` darling

And there`s the trick: It`s polarizing. Some absolutely love it, some totally hate it. So, as much as I don`t like the brand, they`re doing something right: They`re not everybody’s darling. They aren`t trying to please everyone. They´re not trying to be somewhere in the middle, catering for as many as possible, but they stand for something distinct.

When I think of Michael Kors, I immediately have a scene, like a short film, in my mind: a posh girl with a lot of make-up. She parties with other posh people in modern-looking locations where expensive cars are parked outside. When thinking of the brand Patagonia, I imagine a fit-looking girl without makeup and with untidy hair. She`s sitting all smiles outside a wooden cabin in the mountains with her friends enjoying a coffee and a sunrise. If I wanted to live like a very cool, elegant, successful-looking businesswoman, jumping from one important meeting to the next even more important conference, I would be drawn to Hugo Boss.

fashion storytelling Happiness Factor people on bench for fashion photo

Personally, I love Vintage, because I associate it with coolness, nonchalance, city-life, and sophisticated style. With going car-boot-sales, free exhibitions, and cheap coffee shops while living on some freelance jobs. Not that I necessarily have all that, but I would like it. And it matches the story I want to tell about myself. So, I wear it.

Storytelling and identity

It`s all stereotypes of course, and our own real-life story has many more layers than that. But these images are giving the brand its character. It`s something, that people can identify with – or not. Fashion is not just items of clothes, but a way for people to express and distinguish themselves.

It`s all about storytelling. That`s why fashion photography is so important. It tells a story and it shapes a clear image and feeling about a brand. Knowingly or not, we want to tell our story and choose which stories we can match with ours and which dreams we want to be part of.

What kind of fashion or brands do you feel drawn to and why? Have you ever bought an item just because it made you think of a scene or an image or a dream about how you would like to be?

Mode Storytelling

In letzter Zeit wird viel darüber gesprochen, wie die Zukunft der Mode aussieht und wie Mode-Unternehmen überleben können. Vor ein paar Monaten hatte ich ein interessantes Interview mit Prof. Dr. Jochen Strähle, Dekan der Fakultät Textil und Design an der Hochschule Reutlingen. Er sagt: „80 Millionen Menschen werden immer etwas zum Anziehen brauchen und es wird immer Bedarf nach persönlichem Ausdruck geben. Ständiger Umbruch ist Kennzeichen der Modeindustrie und darin sehen viele die Kreativität. Wenn Neues als Krise verstanden wird, dann ist die Textilindustrie seit hundert Jahren in der Krise.“

Was mir dabei aufgefallen ist: Er hat sofort auf den persönlichen Ausdruck verwiesen. Und schließlich geht es ja in der Mode genau darum. Darin liegt die Chance für jeden Designer und jede Marke.

Beispiel Michael Kors: Ich persönlich würde meine Sachen lieber in meine Jackentaschen stopfen, als eine Tasche mit dem MK-Label zu tragen. Aber andere sind ganz verrückt nach diesen Taschen. An Black Friday sind vor dem Michael Kors Outlet regelmäßig lange Schlangen – bis weit vor dem Ladeneingang. Tatsächlich hat Michael Kors meist die längste Schlange von allen Outlets.

Nicht Everybody`s Darling

Und hier ist der Trick: Die Marke ist polarisierend. Manche lieben sie und manche hassen sie. So wenig ich MK mag, sie machen etwas richtig: Sie sind nicht „Everybody`s Darling“. Sie versuchen nicht, allen zu gefallen. Sie bemühen sich nicht darum, irgendwo in der Mitte zu schwimmen, um so vielen wie möglich gerecht zu werden. Sondern sie haben eine klare Position und stehen für etwas Bestimmtes.

Wenn ich an Michael Kors denke, dann habe ich sofort eine Szene, einen kleinen Film, vor Augen: eine gestylte, posh aussehende Frau mit viel Make-up und Glamour. Sie feiert mit anderen schicken Leuten in modernen Locations, vor denen teure Autos geparkt sind.

Wenn ich an die Marke Patagonia denke, stelle ich mir ein gutaussehendes junges Mädchen vor, ohne Makeup und mit unordentlichen Haaren. Sie sitzt lachend mit ihren Freunden vor einer Holzhütte und genießt Kaffee und Sonnenaufgang.

Wenn ich von einem Leben als coole, elegante, erfolgreich aussehende Geschäftsfrau träumen würde, die von einem wichtigen Meeting zur nächsten noch wichtigeren Konferenz wandelt, dann würde es mich zu Hugo Boss ziehen.

fashion storytelling Your story Happiness Factor Fashion Photography McWilmanns Nadine Wilmanns

Persönlich mag ich Vintage, weil ich es mit Coolness, Lässigkeit, Stadtleben und gutem Style verbinde. Mit Flohmarktbesuchen, zu Ausstellungen mit freiem Eintritt gehen, billigen Cafés und von Freiberufler-Jobs leben. Nicht, dass ich all das unbedingt habe, aber ich hätte es gern. Und es passt zu der Geschichte, die ich gern über mich erzählen will. Also trage ich Vintage.

Storytelling und Identität

Natürlich sind das alles Stereotypen und die Geschichte unseres Lebens hat viel mehr Facetten. Aber solche Bilder geben einer Marke ihren Charakter. Das ist etwas, mit dem sich Leute identifizieren können – oder eben nicht. Mode ist nicht nur Kleidung, sondern eine Möglichkeit sich auszudrücken und abzugrenzen.

Es geht immer ums Storytelling. Deswegen ist Modefotografie so wichtig. Sie erzählt eine Geschichte und sie formt ein klares Bild und Gefühl einer Marke.  Bewusst oder unbewusst wollen wir unsere Geschichte erzählen und wählen, welche Geschichten zu unseren eigenen passen und von welchen Träumen wir Teil sein wollen.

Welche Mode oder welche Marken ziehst du gern an und warum? Kaufst du manchmal Kleidungsstücke, nur weil sie dich an eine bestimmte Szene oder ein Image oder einen Traum, wie du gern sein möchtest, erinnern?

The full picture

the full picture fashionblog fast fashion stripes

On British TV, Channel 4 is airing a “documentary” about Missguided, a fast-fashion giant based in Manchester that produces cheap, low-quality garments. Channel 4 is not really documenting though. Instead, they`re staging a glamorous glittering fashion world and hiding the fact that Missguided is contributing to the exploitation of low-paid workers and pollution by poor choice of materials. They`re not showing the full picture at all.

A comment on the Channel4 Instagram post says:  “My friend was working for Missguided when this was being filmed and everything was totally set up!” While I`m not surprised about this, I am still disappointed that a major TV station is willing to spread lies without giving the full picture, and promoting such a bad example of the fashion industry in such an uninvestigative way. 

On the good side

Earlier this year I had to proofread a PR article for a magazine about a car company claiming that it`s super-sustainable because of its electric car range. However, electric cars are not sustainable AT ALL. (see for example: https://psuvanguard.com/electric-cars-arent-really-green/ ). Luckily, I could compromise with my boss, that we would at least neutralize the article: Saying they`re doing electric cars (which they do) but not claiming this to be sustainable. Not ideal, of course, but still something.

Isn`t it that we usually want to do something good with our lives, fight the good fight, be on the good side. And especially as a journalist, but generally as a person, you want to keep some integrity. I do wonder: Channel 4 has money and they are choosers – so why don`t they support for example sustainable fashion, instead of promoting Missguided of all brands?

The change in the little for the full picture

If we work for companies with unethical business manners, we can find ourselves kind of contributing to something that in fact we don`t want to support at all. Let`s keep on believing the best though and let`s try to be the change in every little tiny decision that is up to us. So that, when looking at the full picture, there is some good stuff to see, too.  

Ganz im Bild

Im Englischen Fernsehen wird auf Channel4 gerade eine “Dokumentation” über Missguided gezeigt. Missguided ist ein großes Modeunternehmen im Fast-Fashion Sektor, der Billig-Kleidung produziert.  Channel 4 dokumentiert allerdings nicht wirklich. Stattdessen führen sie eine glamouröse, Bling-Bling-Modewelt vor und verschweigen, dass Missguided unterbezahlte Produktions-Arbeiter ausbeutet und zur Umweltverschmutzung beiträgt, weil es Billigmaterialien verwendet. Channel 4 zeigt da nicht das Gesamtbild.

Ein Kommentar auf den Channel4 Instagram Post zur “Doku” sagt: “Meine Freundin hat während den Dreharbeiten für Missguided gearbeitet und alles war total gespielt und arrangiert.“ Zwar bin ich davon nicht überrascht, aber ich bin doch enttäuscht, dass ein großer Fernsehsender bereit dazu ist, Lügen zu verbreiten, ohne das Gesamtbild zu zeigen. Und, dass sie solch ein schlechtes Beispiel der Modeindustrie bewerben, ohne das zu hinterfragen. 

Auf der guten Seite

Anfang des Jahres sollte ich einen PR-Artikel für ein Magazin Korrektur lesen. Der Artikel war über eine Autofirma, die behauptet wegen ihrer Elektroautos besonders nachhaltig zu sein. Aber Elektroautos sind überhaupt nicht nachhaltig (siehe zum Beispiel: https://psuvanguard.com/electric-cars-arent-really-green/ ). Zum Glück konnte ich mit meinem Chef einen Kompromiss finden, dass wir den Artikel zumindest neutral umschreiben: Sagen, dass die Firma Elektroautos verkauft aber nicht behaupten, dass das nachhaltig ist. Natürlich nicht ideal, aber immerhin was.

Wollen wir normalerweise etwas Gutes mit unserem Leben machen wollen, uns für gute Sachen einsetzen wollen und einfach auf der guten Seite stehen wollen? Und vor allem als Journalist, aber auch als Person, will man doch zu dem stehen können, was man schreibt und sagt. I frage mich: Channel 4 hat doch Geld und können sich`s doch aussuchen, was sie unterstützen möchten – warum also nicht zum Beispiel nachhaltige Modemarken, anstatt ausgerechnet Missguided.

Kleine Veränderung im Gesamtbild

Wenn wir für Firmen arbeiten, die unmoralisch arbeiten, finden wir uns in der Situation wieder, dass wir zu etwas beitragen, das wir eigentlich überhaupt nicht unterstützen wollen. Ich hoffe, dass wir trotzdem weiter an das Beste glauben können  und dass wir versuchen, in jeder kleinen Entscheidung , bei der wir die Wahl haben, die kleine Veränderung zum Besseren zu sein. Damit, wenn man das Gesamtbild anschaut, auch etwas Gutes zu sehen ist.  

 

men painting wall the full picture