Dress like you want to be

dress like you want to be Nadine Wilmanns photography

Dress like you want to be

During the past few weeks, I have often been reminded of an advice that has helped me a great deal when I was a teenager: “Fake it till you make it.” As a kid, I was very shy. And by that, I mean VERY shy, not just a bit. After coming across this advice of “faking it”, I started acting as if I wasn`t shy. And after a while, I really wasn`t so shy anymore.

This principle can be helpful in a lot of situations. Some people even claim it can make us rich.

Something that I find helpful in order to put this principle into practice, is to dress like I want to be.

Say, we would like to be more easy-going and relaxed. Let`s picture an imaginary person who has these attributes:  What is he or she wearing? What is his or her signature style? Then we go ahead and dress that way.

This makes it so much easier for us to act accordingly.

What counts is NOT what OTHERS may perceive as attire for a relaxed and easy-going person, but what YOU think such a person would wear.

As well we can think of an existing role model who we think already has that attribute that we would like to have – for example, relaxed and easy-going. It might be a real person, or it might be fictional, like a character in a TV-Show. Whenever we want to act relaxed and easy-going, we just think of our role model.

And back to the fashion aspect: Researchers have shown that “clothes can have profound and systematic psychological and behavioral consequences for their wearers” (http://www.utstat.utoronto.ca/reid/sta2201s/2012/labcoatarticle.pdf). If you wear an outfit that you think your role model would wear too, this will actually make his or her qualities rub off on you.

“When we put on an item of clothing it is common for the wearer to adopt the characteristics associated with that garment”, says Dr. Karen Pine, professor of psychology at the University of Hertfordshire and fashion psychologist. “A lot of clothing has symbolic meaning for us, (…) so when we put it on we prime the brain to behave in ways consistent with that meaning.”

How would you like to be? Go check your wardrobe, and dress and act as if you had that quality already.

Kleide dich so, wie du sein willst

In den letzten Wochen habe ich immer wieder an einen Spruch gedacht, der mir als Teenager einmal sehr geholfen hat: “Fake it till you make it.” (- Tu so als ob…) Als Kind war ich sehr schüchtern. Und ich meine wirklich sehr, nicht nur ein bisschen. Als ich den Rat, so zu tun als ob, gehört habe, habe ich begonnen, mich so zu verhalten, als wäre ich nicht schüchtern. Und nach einer Weile war ich nicht mehr so schüchtern.

Dieses Prinzip, so zu tun als ob, kann in vielen Situationen hilfreich sein. Manche behaupten sogar, es kann Leute reich machen.

Um diesen Rat umzusetzen finde ich es sehr hilfreich, mich so zu kleiden, wie ich sein will.

Sagen wir mal, du willst lässiger und entspannter sein. Stell dir eine Person vor, die diese Eigenschaften hat – was hat sie an? Was macht ihren Style aus? Und dann zieh dich auch mal so an.

Das macht es einfacher, sich auch so zu verhalten.

Was zählt, ist NICHT was ANDERE als eine Garderobe für eine lässige, entspannte Person auffassen könnten. Sondern was DU dir vorstellst, was so eine Person trägt.

Du kannst dir ein tatsächliches Vorbild nehmen, das du als lässig und entspannt wahrnimmst. Das könnte eine reale Person sein, oder eine fiktive Person, zum Beispiel jemand aus einer TV- Serie. Wenn du dich lässig und entspannt verhalten willst, dann denk an dein Vorbild.

Und zurück zum Aspekt der Mode: Wissenschaftler haben gezeigt, dass „Kleider tiefgreifende und vorhersehbare Auswirkungen auf Psyche und Verhalten der Träger haben können“ ( http://www.utstat.utoronto.ca/reid/sta2201s/2012/labcoatarticle.pdf). Wenn du ein Outfit trägst, von dem du denkst, dass es auch dein Vorbild tragen würde, dann werden dessen Eigenschaften auf dich abfärben.

“Wenn wir ein Kleidungsstück anziehen, dann nehmen wir üblicherweise die Eigenschaften an, die wir mit diesem Kleidungsstück verbinden“, sagt Dr. Karen Pine, Professorin für Psychologie an der University of Hertfordshire und Modepsychologin. „Viele Kleider haben eine symbolische Bedeutung für uns. Wenn wir sie anziehen, dann schärfen wir unser Gehirn dafür, uns entsprechend dieser Bedeutung zu verhalten.“

Wie würdest du gern sein? Schau in deinen Kleiderschrank und zieh dich so an und tu so, als hättest du diese Eigenschaft bereits.

Fashion Storytelling

X fashion storytelling Fashion and Lifestyle Photography Portfolio Nadine Wilmanns

Fashion Storytelling

These days, a lot is talked about the future of fashion and how fashion companies can survive. A few months back I had an interesting interview with Prof. Dr. Jochen Strähle, head of the fashion and textile faculty at Reutlingen University. He says: „80 Million people will always need something to wear and there will always be demand for personal expression. Constant change is the very nature of fashion and creativity is rooted in change. If newness is perceived as a crisis then fashion has been in a crisis for the past hundred years.”

What struck me is, that he immediately referred to personal expression. And after all, that`s what fashion is about, and therein lies the opportunity for every designer and every brand.

For example, Michael Kors: Personally, I would rather stuff my things in the pockets of my jacket than using a bag with the MK logo on it. But there are others that are crazy about it. On Black Friday there are queues at the Michael Kors Outlet in Metzingen beginning far outside the store entrance. In fact, Michael Kors usually has the longest queue of all the outlets.

Not everybodys` darling

And there`s the trick: It`s polarizing. Some absolutely love it, some totally hate it. So, as much as I don`t like the brand, they`re doing something right: They`re not everybody’s darling. They aren`t trying to please everyone. They´re not trying to be somewhere in the middle, catering for as many as possible, but they stand for something distinct.

When I think of Michael Kors, I immediately have a scene, like a short film, in my mind: a posh girl with a lot of make-up. She parties with other posh people in modern-looking locations where expensive cars are parked outside. When thinking of the brand Patagonia, I imagine a fit-looking girl without makeup and with untidy hair. She`s sitting all smiles outside a wooden cabin in the mountains with her friends enjoying a coffee and a sunrise. If I wanted to live like a very cool, elegant, successful-looking businesswoman, jumping from one important meeting to the next even more important conference, I would be drawn to Hugo Boss.

fashion storytelling Happiness Factor people on bench for fashion photo

Personally, I love Vintage, because I associate it with coolness, nonchalance, city-life, and sophisticated style. With going car-boot-sales, free exhibitions, and cheap coffee shops while living on some freelance jobs. Not that I necessarily have all that, but I would like it. And it matches the story I want to tell about myself. So, I wear it.

Storytelling and identity

It`s all stereotypes of course, and our own real-life story has many more layers than that. But these images are giving the brand its character. It`s something, that people can identify with – or not. Fashion is not just items of clothes, but a way for people to express and distinguish themselves.

It`s all about storytelling. That`s why fashion photography is so important. It tells a story and it shapes a clear image and feeling about a brand. Knowingly or not, we want to tell our story and choose which stories we can match with ours and which dreams we want to be part of.

What kind of fashion or brands do you feel drawn to and why? Have you ever bought an item just because it made you think of a scene or an image or a dream about how you would like to be?

Mode Storytelling

In letzter Zeit wird viel darüber gesprochen, wie die Zukunft der Mode aussieht und wie Mode-Unternehmen überleben können. Vor ein paar Monaten hatte ich ein interessantes Interview mit Prof. Dr. Jochen Strähle, Dekan der Fakultät Textil und Design an der Hochschule Reutlingen. Er sagt: „80 Millionen Menschen werden immer etwas zum Anziehen brauchen und es wird immer Bedarf nach persönlichem Ausdruck geben. Ständiger Umbruch ist Kennzeichen der Modeindustrie und darin sehen viele die Kreativität. Wenn Neues als Krise verstanden wird, dann ist die Textilindustrie seit hundert Jahren in der Krise.“

Was mir dabei aufgefallen ist: Er hat sofort auf den persönlichen Ausdruck verwiesen. Und schließlich geht es ja in der Mode genau darum. Darin liegt die Chance für jeden Designer und jede Marke.

Beispiel Michael Kors: Ich persönlich würde meine Sachen lieber in meine Jackentaschen stopfen, als eine Tasche mit dem MK-Label zu tragen. Aber andere sind ganz verrückt nach diesen Taschen. An Black Friday sind vor dem Michael Kors Outlet regelmäßig lange Schlangen – bis weit vor dem Ladeneingang. Tatsächlich hat Michael Kors meist die längste Schlange von allen Outlets.

Nicht Everybody`s Darling

Und hier ist der Trick: Die Marke ist polarisierend. Manche lieben sie und manche hassen sie. So wenig ich MK mag, sie machen etwas richtig: Sie sind nicht „Everybody`s Darling“. Sie versuchen nicht, allen zu gefallen. Sie bemühen sich nicht darum, irgendwo in der Mitte zu schwimmen, um so vielen wie möglich gerecht zu werden. Sondern sie haben eine klare Position und stehen für etwas Bestimmtes.

Wenn ich an Michael Kors denke, dann habe ich sofort eine Szene, einen kleinen Film, vor Augen: eine gestylte, posh aussehende Frau mit viel Make-up und Glamour. Sie feiert mit anderen schicken Leuten in modernen Locations, vor denen teure Autos geparkt sind.

Wenn ich an die Marke Patagonia denke, stelle ich mir ein gutaussehendes junges Mädchen vor, ohne Makeup und mit unordentlichen Haaren. Sie sitzt lachend mit ihren Freunden vor einer Holzhütte und genießt Kaffee und Sonnenaufgang.

Wenn ich von einem Leben als coole, elegante, erfolgreich aussehende Geschäftsfrau träumen würde, die von einem wichtigen Meeting zur nächsten noch wichtigeren Konferenz wandelt, dann würde es mich zu Hugo Boss ziehen.

fashion storytelling Your story Happiness Factor Fashion Photography McWilmanns Nadine Wilmanns

Persönlich mag ich Vintage, weil ich es mit Coolness, Lässigkeit, Stadtleben und gutem Style verbinde. Mit Flohmarktbesuchen, zu Ausstellungen mit freiem Eintritt gehen, billigen Cafés und von Freiberufler-Jobs leben. Nicht, dass ich all das unbedingt habe, aber ich hätte es gern. Und es passt zu der Geschichte, die ich gern über mich erzählen will. Also trage ich Vintage.

Storytelling und Identität

Natürlich sind das alles Stereotypen und die Geschichte unseres Lebens hat viel mehr Facetten. Aber solche Bilder geben einer Marke ihren Charakter. Das ist etwas, mit dem sich Leute identifizieren können – oder eben nicht. Mode ist nicht nur Kleidung, sondern eine Möglichkeit sich auszudrücken und abzugrenzen.

Es geht immer ums Storytelling. Deswegen ist Modefotografie so wichtig. Sie erzählt eine Geschichte und sie formt ein klares Bild und Gefühl einer Marke.  Bewusst oder unbewusst wollen wir unsere Geschichte erzählen und wählen, welche Geschichten zu unseren eigenen passen und von welchen Träumen wir Teil sein wollen.

Welche Mode oder welche Marken ziehst du gern an und warum? Kaufst du manchmal Kleidungsstücke, nur weil sie dich an eine bestimmte Szene oder ein Image oder einen Traum, wie du gern sein möchtest, erinnern?

Changes ahead

changes ahaid fashion after corona hairstyle with scrunchie

Changes ahead

I wonder whether after this crisis there will be a change in fashion. Whether in 30 years’ time, the books about the history of fashion will report that in “the twenties” of this decade there were some fundamental changes of some sort due to the COVID crisis.

Like in the twenties of the last decade, after World War I. Women went from wearing tight corsets to dancing in loosely fitted, short, sleeveless dresses. Because they wanted to feel free and light. Or in the fifties, after World War II, when Christian Dior introduced the New Look. A look, emphasizing the womans` hourglass figure, a tiny waist. Women wanted to feel ladylike and like the perfect housewife.

It`s just fun

Fashion used to react to crises and political changes. Because people long for change after a period of difficulties. So let`s see if there is going to be another fashion revolution after this current crisis, too. Maybe we `re heading into the aera of the pyjama style. Wide comfy trousers with matching sweaters. I would be in for it.

That`s what I like about fashion: It`s “just” fashion, it`s always fun, whatever the change. As long as we shop mindfully, ideally second-hand, and not from brands that exploit their workers and the environment of course.

Currently, I love my home office-look: baggy pullovers, sports-pants, tucked into think socks, and scrunchie in the hair.  What are you wearing lately, and what trend would you like to see coming?

Neues vor uns

Mal schauen, ob es nach dieser Krise einen Wandel in der Mode gibt. Ob die Bücher über Modegeschichte in 30 Jahren berichten werden, dass es „in den Zwanzigern“ dieses Jahrhunderts wegen der COVID-Krise eine Moderevolution gab.

Wie in den Zwanzigern des letzten Jahrhunderts, nach dem ersten Weltkrieg. Frauen haben statt enger Korsetts lieber in weit geschnittenen, kurzen, ärmellosen Kleidern getanzt. Denn sie wollten sich frei und leicht fühlen. Oder in den Fünfzigern, nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg, als Christian Dior den New Look einführte. Ein Look, der die Sanduhr-Figur der Frau, eine schmale Taille, betonte. Frauen wollten sich damenhaft fühlen und wie die perfekte Hausfrau.

Nur Spaß

Mode hat immer auf Krisen und politische Veränderungen reagiert. Weil Leute nach schwierigen Zeiten Lust auf was anderes haben. Also mal schauen, ob es nach dieser aktuellen Krise wieder eine Moderevolution gibt. Vielleicht gehen wir in eine Ära des Pyjama-Styles. Weite, bequeme Hosen mit passenden Sweatshirts. Ich wäre dabei!  

Das mag ich an der Mode so sehr: Es ist “nur” Mode, sie macht immer Spaß, egal wie sie sich ändert. Solange wir bewusst einkaufen natürlich, also am besten second-hand und nicht von Marken, die ihre Arbeiter und die Umwelt ausbeuten.

Gerade mag ich meinen Homeoffice-Look: Weite Pullis, Sporthosen, in dicke Socken gestopft, und Scrunchie im Haar.  Was trägst du so in letzter Zeit und welchen Trend würdest du gerne sehen?