Johanna Riplinger

fashion designer Johanna Riplinger by Nadine Wilmanns photography

"I do almost everything from a place of intrinsic motivation."

In Conversation with Johanna Riplinger

The first thought that comes to my mind when meeting fashion designer Johanna Riplinger in Stuttgart: Joie de vie! She is all smiles and reminds me so much of Paris and French elegance. Johanna has been living in Paris for years and has founded her fashion label there (www.johannariplinger.com). After a detour to Portugal, she now brings a little bit of Paris into the Stuttgart shopping mall “Gerber”. In collaboration with other creatives and as one of the founding partners, she presents her fashion in the concept store FYRA Collective. She embraces the opportunity of living as a nomad, she says. For her one-of-a-kind garments, she hand-dyes fabrics with plant-based dyes. Nature and natural cycles are not only shaping her fashion but as well her approach to work. We have met in the store first and later again for some dyeing in the garden. Both elements are intrinsically tied together, she says. 

The COVID-crisis is making life for fashion designers difficult... How are you getting on, Johanna?

I stick to making the best out of every situation. Just now, our concept of the collective at FYRA Collective has proven its worth. Especially due to our holistic approach to sharing economy. Currently, I`m staying in Tübingen, dyeing my fabrics surrounded by nature. But of course, I`m also looking forward to going to Paris again soon.

Your love for nature have had a distinct impact on your career path as a fashion designer…

As a student, I have already worked with plant-based dyes. I’ve always wanted to work in sustainability and fair trade. Meanwhile, a lot of what had been met with lack of understanding 20 years ago, I don`t even have to explain anymore. It`s become common knowledge. I love being creative in harmony with nature. The design has always been my focus, yet nature shouldn’t suffer. Nature for me isn`t just the exterior nature, the plants, but as well the human nature, the human biodiversity. Therefore, I value the harmony in our FYRA team, our mutual appreciation in our collective. Everyone collaborates on a level playing field, yet each of us is independent. To me, that`s also nature.

fashion designer Johanna Riplinger by Nadine Wilmanns photography

What characterizes your fashion?

My work starts with high-quality organic and sustainable material. I love to create themed collections and recently I started to do more custom-made items such as the kimono collection. Characteristics are the Parisian feminine style, simplicity, and the patterns on the fabrics. The ladder result from an unconventional implementation of the Japanese folding and dying technique Shibori, which I apply when dyeing with plants.

Also the cut of your garments reminds of Japanese fashion…

I have always been fascinated with Japan. As a child, my parents had a visitor from Japan who prepared a  tea ceremony in the garden for us. That wowed me. As a student, I spent three terms in Tokyo. Lately, I`m very much coming back to the kimono. The kimono is very versatile and thus is a rather nomadic item. It can be worn as a coat, or with a belt as a dress. My collection needs to match my lifestyle as a nomad. I could fit my entire collection in that suitcase that you brought to transport your studio lights. Traditional Japanese would probably say that this is not a kimono. However, I do maintain essential elements of the Japanese style: An abundance of creativity united with a distinct, simple shape. The kimono is comfy, smart, feminine, and it suits each shape – tiny, chubby, tall, short. I want to remind women of the power they have.

fashion designer Johanna Riplinger by Nadine Wilmanns photography

My collection needs to match my lifestyle as a nomad.

Before founding your own label, you have been working for well-known brands in Paris. Guy Laroche for example, or Ethos Paris. Then you have taken a chance and became self-employed. Many creatives are afraid to do that, even though it`s their dream. After all, being self-employed means you don`t have to just design but also do the marketing.

I have always thought, why not try and do it my way. And now, ten years later, I`m still here. There`s been a year when I haven’t posted on Instagram at all. I don`t force myself. Marketing experts would most likely criticize me. But I really do almost everything from a place of intrinsic motivation. This implies taking the courage to do what feels right for me. When I was ten years old, I decided to become a fashion designer. I am still enthusiastic about it – three times as much as when I started! Of course, there are ups and downs, but that`s life. However, I have been very lucky in life, too. 

Surely you have learned a lot as well?

About 15 years ago, I wouldn`t have thought of myself as any good in sales. Until I have learned what selling actually means: human exchange. From then on, I started to love it. Because I see the value in it. I have stopped looking at it in a negative way but started to appreciate it as valuable. I`m happy when a customer walks into the shop and values our items – both of our happiness multiplies.

Sales of all things seems to be a problem for many self-employed fashion designers – and tied to this are the finances…

We could earn much more with our abilities if we worked for big companies. But for us, intrinsic motivation, creative freedom, is more important. We love what we do. Society forces us, to make commercial things. It`s the challenge of the system, to evolve in a way that simplifies fulfilled work and makes it more accessible. There is a saying ‘Success without fulfillment is the ultimate failure’. Achieving to live fulfilled is the greatest success. Yesterday, we had a little photoshoot. That was such an energy boost for all of us. We have celebrated the joy in what we`re doing. Our society needs both: big, static corporations and small creative businesses.

fashion designer Johanna Riplinger by Nadine Wilmanns photography

What`s important for self-employed creatives in the future?

There are many platforms for creatives. However, they aren`t run by the creatives themselves. I would find it more beneficial if a platform wasn`t just enabling creatives to introduce themselves. But if it allowed these creatives to run the platform itself. That would make more sense to me. Our FYRA collective is kind of a prototype of such a platform. I`ve never seen myself as a pioneer, yet I seem to have become exactly that. At FYRA, we are multiplying our talents by offering them to each other. This way, we are marketing our products much more effectively. We are collaborating as equals. The customer is still king, but we are also all bosses. Our customers are invited to share our passion for our beautiful, timeless items. We are taking turns in being present in the store, which allows for the conversation with our customers. This is very inspiring. Suggestions can be implemented in the collection much faster as I see first-hand what people need and want. In the long run, we want to become more international. Especially the Stuttgart-Paris-Connection is promising.  

"Ich mache das meiste aus intrinsischer Motivation"

Im Gespräch mit Johanna Riplinger

Das erste, was mir einfällt, als ich Modedesignerin Johanna Riplinger in Stuttgart treffe: La joie de vie! Sie strahlt und erinnert mich dabei so sehr an Paris und französische Eleganz. Johanna hat viele Jahre in Paris verbracht, ihr Modelabel dort gegründet (www.johannariplinger.com). Und nun bringt sie, nach einem Abstecher in Portugal, ein bisschen Paris ins Stuttgarter Einkaufszentrum „Gerber“. Zusammen mit anderen Kreativen präsentiert sie hier ihre Mode im Concept-Store FYRA Collective, dessen Mitgründerin sie ist. Sie schätzt die Möglichkeit als Nomadin zu leben, sagt sie. Die Stoffe für ihre Einzelstücke färbt sie von Hand und individuell mit Pflanzenfarben. Die Natur und natürliche Kreisläufe prägen allerdings nicht nur ihre Mode, sondern auch ihre Arbeitsweise als Selbständige. Wir haben uns erst im Store getroffen und später nochmal beim Färben im Garten. Beide Elemente gehören für sie untrennbar zusammen.

Die Corona-Krise macht es den Modedesignern im Moment nicht einfach... Wie geht`s dir gerade damit Johanna?

Ich halte mich daran, das Beste aus jeder Situation zu machen, in der ich mich gerade befinde. Gerade jetzt hat sich unser Konzept des Kollektivs bei FYRA sehr bewährt. Vor allem wegen unseres ganzheitlichen Ansatzes einer ‘Sharing Economy’. Momentan lebe ich in Tübingen, wo ich in der Natur meine Stoffe färbe. Natürlich freue ich mich aber auch, wenn ich bald wieder nach Paris fahren kann.

fashion designer Johanna Riplinger by Nadine Wilmanns photography

Gerade deine Liebe zur Natur hat deinen Weg als Modedesignerin entscheidend beeinflusst ...

Ich habe bereits im Studium mit Pflanzenfarben gearbeitet und wollte immer im Bereich Nachhaltigkeit und Fairtrade wirken. Inzwischen muss ich vieles von dem, was vor 20 Jahren noch auf Unverständnis gestoßen ist, gar nicht mehr erklären. Es ist schön in Harmonie mit der Natur kreativ zu sein. Mir ging es immer in erster Linie ums Design, aber die Natur soll nicht darunter leiden. Dazu gehört für mich aber nicht nur die äußere Natur, die Pflanzen, sondern auch die menschliche Natur, die menschliche Biodiversität. Deswegen schätze ich unsere Harmonie im FYRA-Team, unsere gegenseitige Wertschätzung im Kollektiv. Alle arbeiten auf Augenhöhe zusammen und doch ist jeder selbständig. Auch das bedeutet Natur für mich.

Was zeichnet deine Mode aus?

Meine Arbeit beginnt mit hochwertigem, biologischem und nachhaltigem Material. Ich kreiere gerne Kollektionen mit verschiedenen Themen. Kürzlich habe ich mehr individuelle Stücke auf Bestellung gemacht, etwa die Kimono-Kollektion. Kennzeichen sind der Pariser feminine Stil, Einfachheit und die Muster der Stoffe. Letztere entstehen durch die unkonventionelle Umsetzung der Japanischen Falt- und Färbetechnik Shibori, die ich beim Färben mit Pflanzenfarben anwende.

fashion designer Johanna Riplinger by Nadine Wilmanns photography

Meine Kollektion muss zu meinem Lebensstil als Nomadin passen.

Auch deine Schnitte erinnern sehr an japanische Mode...

Ich war immer von Japan begeistert.  Als Kind hatten meine Eltern einen Gast aus Japan, der für uns eine Teezeremonie im Garten vorbereitet hat. Das hat mich sehr fasziniert. Während meines Studiums habe ich ein Trimester in Tokyo verbracht. Gerade komme ich stark zum Kimono zurück. Der Kimono ist extrem wandlungsfähig und daher ein sehr nomadisches Kleidungsstück. Er kann als Mantel getragen werden, oder mit Gürtel als Kleid. Meine Kollektion muss zu meinem Lebensstil als Nomadin passen. In den Reisekoffer, in dem du deine Lichttechnik transportierst, würde meine Kollektion passen.  Traditionelle Japaner würden vermutlich sagen, das ist kein Kimono. Doch habe ich wesentliche Merkmale des japanischen Stils beibehalten: Überfluss an Kreativität in Verbindung mit Klarheit der Form. Er ist bequem, schick, feminin, passt jeder Figur – dünn dick, groß, klein. Ich möchte Frauen daran erinnern, welche Kraft in ihnen steckt.

Bevor du dein eigenes Label gegründet hast, hast du für namhafte Labels in Paris gearbeitet. Guy Laroche zum Beispiel, oder Ethos Paris. Dann hast du den Sprung in die Selbständigkeit gewagt. Viele Kreative scheuen sich davor, auch wenn sie davon träumen. Schließlich gehört zur Selbständigkeit nicht nur Design, sondern auch Marketing.

Ich habe immer gedacht, ich probier‘s mal auf meine Art und Weise. Und jetzt, nach fast zehn Jahren, bin ich immer noch da. Ich habe auch mal ein Jahr lang gar nichts auf Instagram gestellt – ich zwinge mich da nicht. Marketing-Experten würden mich da sicherlich rügen. Aber ich mache wirklich das meiste aus intrinsischer Motivation. Dazu gehört Mut, sich zu trauen, das zu tun, was einem entspricht. Mit zehn Jahren habe ich beschlossen, Modedesign zu machen. Und ich bin immer noch begeistert davon – habe dreifache Begeisterung im Vergleich zu früher! Natürlich gibt es immer Hochs und Tiefs. Aber in welchem Leben gibt’s das nicht. Aber ich bin auch ein Glückspilz und hatte viel Glück im Leben.

fashion designer Johanna Riplinger by Nadine Wilmanns photography

Bestimmt hast du auch viel gelernt?

Noch vor 15 Jahren habe ich mich nicht als verkaufstüchtig eingeschätzt. Bis ich gelernt habe, was Verkauf eigentlich ist: menschlicher Austausch. Von da an, habe ich angefangen es zu lieben. Denn ich habe den Wert darin gesehen. Ich habe Verkauf nicht mehr als negativ betrachtet, sondern als wertvoll. Ich freue mich, wenn ein Kunde in den Laden kommt und unsere Dinge wertschätzt. Da mehrt sich die Freude bei uns beiden.  

Ausgerechnet das Verkaufen ist oft ein Problem für viele selbständige Modedesigner. Und damit verbunden eben auch die Finanzen...

Wir könnten mit unseren Fähigkeiten alle in großen Konzernen mehr verdienen. Aber für uns ist die intrinsische Motivation, die schöpferische Freiheit wichtiger. Zu lieben, was wir tun. Die Gesellschaft zwingt uns dazu, kommerzielle Dinge zu machen. Es ist die Aufgabe des Systems, sich dahingehend zu entwickeln, dass es den Menschen vereinfacht wird, erfüllt zu arbeiten. Es gibt einen Spruch: Success without fulfillment is the ultimate failure – Erfolg ohne Erfüllung ist der ultimative Misserfolg. Es wirklich zu schaffen, erfüllt zu leben, ist der größte Erfolg. Gestern hatten wir hier ein Fotoshooting. Das war für uns alle so ein Energie-Boost. Wir haben die Freude, an dem was wir machen, gefeiert. Unsere Gesellschaft braucht beides gleichermaßen: große, statische Konzerne und kleine Kreative.

Was ist für kreative Selbständige in Zukunft wichtig?

Es gibt viele Plattformen für Kreative, die aber nicht von den Kreativen selbst geführt werden. Ich finde Plattformen sinnvoll, auf denen sich Kreative nicht nur vorstellen, sondern die sie aktiv mitgestalten können. Unser Kollektiv hier hat insofern Prototypcharakter -und ich habe mich eigentlich nie als Pionierin gesehen. Zusammen multiplizieren wir unsere Talente, stellen sie uns gegenseitig zur Verfügung. Dadurch machen wir gemeinsam auch viel besseres Marketing. Wir arbeiten immer auf Augenhöhe. Der Kunde ist zwar König, aber wir sind hier auch alle Chefs. Unsere Kunden sind eingeladen unsere Passion für unsere schönen, zeitlosen Dinge zu teilen. Dadurch dass wir alle im Laden stehen, haben wir direkten Kontakt zu unseren Kunden. Das inspiriert. Anregungen fließen schneller in die Kollektion mit ein, denn ich sehe direkt was Menschen brauchen und wollen. Langfristig wollen wir internationaler werden. Vor allem die Stuttgart-Paris-Achse ist da natürlich vielversprechend.

fashion designer Johanna Riplinger by Nadine Wilmanns photography
Fashion Designer Johanna Riplinger Bloginterview with photography by Nadine Wilmanns

Sustainable Jeans

sustainable Jeans Nadine Wilmanns fashion photography

A shopping strategy for buying sustainable jeans on a budget

One thing I really cannot stand is wearing jeans that don`t fit me well. Or jeans that aren`t of my currently preferred style. A good pair of jeans can actually make an outfit. And a bad one can ruin it. So this is definitely THE item of clothing to spend a bit of money on if needed. Unfortunately, it`s most difficult to find well-fitting jeans that are in the right shape, budget, AND that are sustainably produced. The ladder often requires shopping online.

Quick side note on why it`s so important to buy sustainably produced jeans: Jeans can be the most unsustainable garments ever, because of their production. The production of just ONE single pair of regularly, not sustainably produced jeans requires around 8000 liters of water. Plus, from growing the cotton to finishing the garment, many harmful chemicals and pesticides are involved. They are harming the workers and they keep on lingering in the fabric which will be on my skin.

sustainable Jeans Nadine Wilmanns fashion photography

Good on you...

 

After downloading the App “Good on you” which rates brands according to their sustainability, I found that not all brands that label themselves as “sustainable” are in fact sustainable (hello greenwashing….)

“Truly” sustainably produced jeans are fairly expensive. So ideally, I would find some second-hand. Finding good jeans in a charity shop is like winning the lottery. And the downside of online second-hand platforms like “vinted” is that you can`t return stuff for free.

 

So here`s my strategy: I check the app for sustainable brands that sell jeans and order a few pairs of jeans online – checking that there`s the option to return them for free. This way, I can find out which brands have “my fit”. If there happens to be a match in terms of fit and budget, I choose one pair of jeans to keep and send back the rest. But I will note which brands and styles have fitted me well. So knowing that these brands seem to have a fit that works for my shape, I can occasionally check if there are any second-hand jeans of that label in my size on vinted or any second-hand platform. Happy days!

Shopping Strategie für nachhaltige Jeans

Wenn ich etwas nicht ausstehen kann, dann eine Jeans anzuhaben, die mir nicht gut passt. Oder eine, die nicht den Schnitt hat, den ich gerade mag. Eine gute Jeans kann das Outfit super machen – und eine Schlechte kann es ruinieren. Deswegen ist eine Jeans auf jeden Fall DAS Kleidungsstück, für das ich auch mal mehr bezahlen würde. Leider ist es superschwer, gutsitzende Jeans zu finden, die den richtigen Schnitt haben, die ich bezahlen kann UND die auch noch nachhaltig produziert wurden. Für Letzteres muss man oft online schauen.

Kleine Anmerkung warum es so wichtig ist nachhaltig produzierte Jeans zu kaufen: Für die Produktion EINER Jeans, die nicht nachhaltig produziert ist, werden um die 8000 Liter Wasser verbraucht. Außerdem kommen vom Baumwollanbau bis zum fertigen Endprodukt schädliche Chemikalien und Pestizide zum Einsatz. Die schaden den Arbeitern uns sie sind dann auch im Stoff, also auf meiner Haut.

Gut an dir...

sustainable Jeans Nadine Wilmanns fashion photography

Nachdem ich die App “Good on you” heruntergeladen habe, die Marken nach ihrer Nachhaltigkeit bewertet, habe ich gesehen, dass nicht alle Marken, die sich selbst als „nachhaltig“ bezeichnen, auch nachhaltig sind (hallo Greenwashing…)

„Wirklich“ nachhaltig produzierte Jeans sind relativ teuer. Daher wäre es ideal, welche Second Hand zu finden. Aber gute Jeans in einem Second Hand Laden zu finden, ist wie ein Sechser im Lotto. Und der Nachteil von Online Second Hand Plattformen wie “vinted” ist, dass man Sachen nicht kostenlos zurückschicken kann.  

Hier ist also meine Strategie: Ich checke die App, um nachhaltige Marken zu finden, die Jeans anbieten. Dann bestelle ich ein paar Jeans online – und achte darauf, dass ich sie wieder kostenlos zurückschicken kann. So kann ich herausfinden, welche Marken meine Passform haben. Wenn mir zufällig welche passen und in meinem Budget sind, behalte ich eine Jeans und schicke die anderen wieder zurück. Aber ich mache mir eine Notiz, welche Marken und Modelle mir gut gepasst haben. Weil ich jetzt weiß, welche Marke mir gut passt, kann ich immer mal wieder „vinted“ oder andere Second Hand Plattformen checken, ob`s da Jeans von der Marke in meiner Größe gibt. 🙂

sustainable jeans Nadine Wilmanns fashion photographer

Dress like you want to be

dress like you want to be Nadine Wilmanns photography

Dress like you want to be

During the past few weeks, I have often been reminded of an advice that has helped me a great deal when I was a teenager: “Fake it till you make it.” As a kid, I was very shy. And by that, I mean VERY shy, not just a bit. After coming across this advice of “faking it”, I started acting as if I wasn`t shy. And after a while, I really wasn`t so shy anymore.

This principle can be helpful in a lot of situations. Some people even claim it can make us rich.

Something that I find helpful in order to put this principle into practice, is to dress like I want to be.

Say, we would like to be more easy-going and relaxed. Let`s picture an imaginary person who has these attributes:  What is he or she wearing? What is his or her signature style? Then we go ahead and dress that way.

This makes it so much easier for us to act accordingly.

What counts is NOT what OTHERS may perceive as attire for a relaxed and easy-going person, but what YOU think such a person would wear.

As well we can think of an existing role model who we think already has that attribute that we would like to have – for example, relaxed and easy-going. It might be a real person, or it might be fictional, like a character in a TV-Show. Whenever we want to act relaxed and easy-going, we just think of our role model.

And back to the fashion aspect: Researchers have shown that “clothes can have profound and systematic psychological and behavioral consequences for their wearers” (http://www.utstat.utoronto.ca/reid/sta2201s/2012/labcoatarticle.pdf). If you wear an outfit that you think your role model would wear too, this will actually make his or her qualities rub off on you.

“When we put on an item of clothing it is common for the wearer to adopt the characteristics associated with that garment”, says Dr. Karen Pine, professor of psychology at the University of Hertfordshire and fashion psychologist. “A lot of clothing has symbolic meaning for us, (…) so when we put it on we prime the brain to behave in ways consistent with that meaning.”

How would you like to be? Go check your wardrobe, and dress and act as if you had that quality already.

Kleide dich so, wie du sein willst

In den letzten Wochen habe ich immer wieder an einen Spruch gedacht, der mir als Teenager einmal sehr geholfen hat: “Fake it till you make it.” (- Tu so als ob…) Als Kind war ich sehr schüchtern. Und ich meine wirklich sehr, nicht nur ein bisschen. Als ich den Rat, so zu tun als ob, gehört habe, habe ich begonnen, mich so zu verhalten, als wäre ich nicht schüchtern. Und nach einer Weile war ich nicht mehr so schüchtern.

Dieses Prinzip, so zu tun als ob, kann in vielen Situationen hilfreich sein. Manche behaupten sogar, es kann Leute reich machen.

Um diesen Rat umzusetzen finde ich es sehr hilfreich, mich so zu kleiden, wie ich sein will.

Sagen wir mal, du willst lässiger und entspannter sein. Stell dir eine Person vor, die diese Eigenschaften hat – was hat sie an? Was macht ihren Style aus? Und dann zieh dich auch mal so an.

Das macht es einfacher, sich auch so zu verhalten.

Was zählt, ist NICHT was ANDERE als eine Garderobe für eine lässige, entspannte Person auffassen könnten. Sondern was DU dir vorstellst, was so eine Person trägt.

Du kannst dir ein tatsächliches Vorbild nehmen, das du als lässig und entspannt wahrnimmst. Das könnte eine reale Person sein, oder eine fiktive Person, zum Beispiel jemand aus einer TV- Serie. Wenn du dich lässig und entspannt verhalten willst, dann denk an dein Vorbild.

Und zurück zum Aspekt der Mode: Wissenschaftler haben gezeigt, dass „Kleider tiefgreifende und vorhersehbare Auswirkungen auf Psyche und Verhalten der Träger haben können“ ( http://www.utstat.utoronto.ca/reid/sta2201s/2012/labcoatarticle.pdf). Wenn du ein Outfit trägst, von dem du denkst, dass es auch dein Vorbild tragen würde, dann werden dessen Eigenschaften auf dich abfärben.

“Wenn wir ein Kleidungsstück anziehen, dann nehmen wir üblicherweise die Eigenschaften an, die wir mit diesem Kleidungsstück verbinden“, sagt Dr. Karen Pine, Professorin für Psychologie an der University of Hertfordshire und Modepsychologin. „Viele Kleider haben eine symbolische Bedeutung für uns. Wenn wir sie anziehen, dann schärfen wir unser Gehirn dafür, uns entsprechend dieser Bedeutung zu verhalten.“

Wie würdest du gern sein? Schau in deinen Kleiderschrank und zieh dich so an und tu so, als hättest du diese Eigenschaft bereits.

Fashion Storytelling

X fashion storytelling Fashion and Lifestyle Photography Portfolio Nadine Wilmanns

Fashion Storytelling

These days, a lot is talked about the future of fashion and how fashion companies can survive. A few months back I had an interesting interview with Prof. Dr. Jochen Strähle, head of the fashion and textile faculty at Reutlingen University. He says: „80 Million people will always need something to wear and there will always be demand for personal expression. Constant change is the very nature of fashion and creativity is rooted in change. If newness is perceived as a crisis then fashion has been in a crisis for the past hundred years.”

What struck me is, that he immediately referred to personal expression. And after all, that`s what fashion is about, and therein lies the opportunity for every designer and every brand.

For example, Michael Kors: Personally, I would rather stuff my things in the pockets of my jacket than using a bag with the MK logo on it. But there are others that are crazy about it. On Black Friday there are queues at the Michael Kors Outlet in Metzingen beginning far outside the store entrance. In fact, Michael Kors usually has the longest queue of all the outlets.

Not everybodys` darling

And there`s the trick: It`s polarizing. Some absolutely love it, some totally hate it. So, as much as I don`t like the brand, they`re doing something right: They`re not everybody’s darling. They aren`t trying to please everyone. They´re not trying to be somewhere in the middle, catering for as many as possible, but they stand for something distinct.

When I think of Michael Kors, I immediately have a scene, like a short film, in my mind: a posh girl with a lot of make-up. She parties with other posh people in modern-looking locations where expensive cars are parked outside. When thinking of the brand Patagonia, I imagine a fit-looking girl without makeup and with untidy hair. She`s sitting all smiles outside a wooden cabin in the mountains with her friends enjoying a coffee and a sunrise. If I wanted to live like a very cool, elegant, successful-looking businesswoman, jumping from one important meeting to the next even more important conference, I would be drawn to Hugo Boss.

fashion storytelling Happiness Factor people on bench for fashion photo

Personally, I love Vintage, because I associate it with coolness, nonchalance, city-life, and sophisticated style. With going car-boot-sales, free exhibitions, and cheap coffee shops while living on some freelance jobs. Not that I necessarily have all that, but I would like it. And it matches the story I want to tell about myself. So, I wear it.

Storytelling and identity

It`s all stereotypes of course, and our own real-life story has many more layers than that. But these images are giving the brand its character. It`s something, that people can identify with – or not. Fashion is not just items of clothes, but a way for people to express and distinguish themselves.

It`s all about storytelling. That`s why fashion photography is so important. It tells a story and it shapes a clear image and feeling about a brand. Knowingly or not, we want to tell our story and choose which stories we can match with ours and which dreams we want to be part of.

What kind of fashion or brands do you feel drawn to and why? Have you ever bought an item just because it made you think of a scene or an image or a dream about how you would like to be?

Mode Storytelling

In letzter Zeit wird viel darüber gesprochen, wie die Zukunft der Mode aussieht und wie Mode-Unternehmen überleben können. Vor ein paar Monaten hatte ich ein interessantes Interview mit Prof. Dr. Jochen Strähle, Dekan der Fakultät Textil und Design an der Hochschule Reutlingen. Er sagt: „80 Millionen Menschen werden immer etwas zum Anziehen brauchen und es wird immer Bedarf nach persönlichem Ausdruck geben. Ständiger Umbruch ist Kennzeichen der Modeindustrie und darin sehen viele die Kreativität. Wenn Neues als Krise verstanden wird, dann ist die Textilindustrie seit hundert Jahren in der Krise.“

Was mir dabei aufgefallen ist: Er hat sofort auf den persönlichen Ausdruck verwiesen. Und schließlich geht es ja in der Mode genau darum. Darin liegt die Chance für jeden Designer und jede Marke.

Beispiel Michael Kors: Ich persönlich würde meine Sachen lieber in meine Jackentaschen stopfen, als eine Tasche mit dem MK-Label zu tragen. Aber andere sind ganz verrückt nach diesen Taschen. An Black Friday sind vor dem Michael Kors Outlet regelmäßig lange Schlangen – bis weit vor dem Ladeneingang. Tatsächlich hat Michael Kors meist die längste Schlange von allen Outlets.

Nicht Everybody`s Darling

Und hier ist der Trick: Die Marke ist polarisierend. Manche lieben sie und manche hassen sie. So wenig ich MK mag, sie machen etwas richtig: Sie sind nicht „Everybody`s Darling“. Sie versuchen nicht, allen zu gefallen. Sie bemühen sich nicht darum, irgendwo in der Mitte zu schwimmen, um so vielen wie möglich gerecht zu werden. Sondern sie haben eine klare Position und stehen für etwas Bestimmtes.

Wenn ich an Michael Kors denke, dann habe ich sofort eine Szene, einen kleinen Film, vor Augen: eine gestylte, posh aussehende Frau mit viel Make-up und Glamour. Sie feiert mit anderen schicken Leuten in modernen Locations, vor denen teure Autos geparkt sind.

Wenn ich an die Marke Patagonia denke, stelle ich mir ein gutaussehendes junges Mädchen vor, ohne Makeup und mit unordentlichen Haaren. Sie sitzt lachend mit ihren Freunden vor einer Holzhütte und genießt Kaffee und Sonnenaufgang.

Wenn ich von einem Leben als coole, elegante, erfolgreich aussehende Geschäftsfrau träumen würde, die von einem wichtigen Meeting zur nächsten noch wichtigeren Konferenz wandelt, dann würde es mich zu Hugo Boss ziehen.

fashion storytelling Your story Happiness Factor Fashion Photography McWilmanns Nadine Wilmanns

Persönlich mag ich Vintage, weil ich es mit Coolness, Lässigkeit, Stadtleben und gutem Style verbinde. Mit Flohmarktbesuchen, zu Ausstellungen mit freiem Eintritt gehen, billigen Cafés und von Freiberufler-Jobs leben. Nicht, dass ich all das unbedingt habe, aber ich hätte es gern. Und es passt zu der Geschichte, die ich gern über mich erzählen will. Also trage ich Vintage.

Storytelling und Identität

Natürlich sind das alles Stereotypen und die Geschichte unseres Lebens hat viel mehr Facetten. Aber solche Bilder geben einer Marke ihren Charakter. Das ist etwas, mit dem sich Leute identifizieren können – oder eben nicht. Mode ist nicht nur Kleidung, sondern eine Möglichkeit sich auszudrücken und abzugrenzen.

Es geht immer ums Storytelling. Deswegen ist Modefotografie so wichtig. Sie erzählt eine Geschichte und sie formt ein klares Bild und Gefühl einer Marke.  Bewusst oder unbewusst wollen wir unsere Geschichte erzählen und wählen, welche Geschichten zu unseren eigenen passen und von welchen Träumen wir Teil sein wollen.

Welche Mode oder welche Marken ziehst du gern an und warum? Kaufst du manchmal Kleidungsstücke, nur weil sie dich an eine bestimmte Szene oder ein Image oder einen Traum, wie du gern sein möchtest, erinnern?

Fashion and Memories

self-assignment Fashion memories sun glasses on couch

Fashion and Memories

One thing I`ve seen confirmed this week: Detail shots of clothes or shoes are not pointless at all. Someday these photographs might help to let stuff go easily.

When organizing my wardrobe, I sometimes find it hard to part from stuff that is reminding me of a good time. More than once I`ve thought: ‘I wish I had taken a picture of when I was wearing this.’

In fact, I`m only having trouble with items that are connected to a nice memory and that I can`t recall being on a picture I like. If I had photographed them while I was still in the moments that have made up their meaning… then I would have an easier time giving these items away. 

A picture of my once everyday shoes while I walk them to a coffee shop on a typical Friday morning before work – that takes practically no space at all. Even if I never take the time to look at the picture again, it will still be stored in my visual memory and the shoes themselves can move on (once the soles start coming off;-)

Mode und Erinnerungen

Eine Sache, die ich diese Woche bestätigt sah: Detailaufnahmen von Kleidungsstücken oder Schuhen sind überhaupt nicht sinnlos. Diese Fotos könnten eines Tages dabei helfen, Sachen leichter wegzugeben.

Wenn ich Kleider aussortiere, fällt es mir manchmal schwer, mich von Sachen zu trennen, die mich an eine gute Zeit erinnern. Ich habe schon öfter gedacht: ‚Ich wünschte, ich hätte ein Foto davon gemacht, als ich das getragen habe.‘ 

Eigentlich habe ich nur Trennungs-Schwierigkeiten bei Kleidungsstücken, die mit einer schönen Erinnerung verbunden sind und bei denen ich von keinem gutem Foto weiß. Wenn ich sie in “ihrem” Moment fotografiert hätte, würde es mir leichter fallen, die Sachen wegzugeben.

Ein Foto von den Schuhen, die ich fast jeden Tag anhatte, als ich an einem typischen Freitagmorgen vor der Arbeit zu einem Café spaziere – das braucht praktisch keinen Platz. Selbst wenn ich das Bild nie wieder anschaue, wird es doch in meinem Bildgedächtnis bleiben und die Schuhe selbst können gehen (wenn die Sohle anfangen sollte, sich zu lösen…;-)

Fashion Memories belt detail