Daniela Reske

„You mustn`t be a perfectionist when doing documentaries“

„You mustn`t be a perfectionist when doing documentary“

photographer Daniela Reske

In Conversation with Daniela Reske

Finally, I start what I`ve had in my mind for a while now: Every now and then I want to interview creatives whose work I find inspiring – photographers, fashion designers and other artists. We can learn so much from each other! Generally, I want to get into the habit of asking questions and most importantly of truly listening. My first interview for this blog is with one of my very favourite photographers, Daniela Reske. She has her studio in Reutlingen-Oferdingen/Germany, and documents weddings internationally. Her pictures are like cinema – one-of-a-kind storyworlds filled with feeling and special moments. We met in her studio, a former boathouse by a river with huge old windows and a cozy fireplace.

Daniela, when I look at your work, I feel like in a movie that I want to keep on watching. How did you get to your unique visual language?

I have always been intrigued by journalism, by pictures that are conveying the moment. When I started out as a photographer twelve years ago, the reportage approach in weddings wasn`t mainstream yet. It was offered by only a few photographers. In the US this approach of documenting the entire day had been common for some time though. Today, wedding documentaries are pretty much standard. I loved the idea of having a photo album that enables people to relive that special day. When are friends and family ever all together? To me it`s important to show what`s happening in a genuine way, to truly document.

How do you put that into practice?

I use a 35 mm prime lens. That makes my pictures look very cinematic. Instead of the typical portrait, I rather capture scenes. I have looked at photographs that I liked and analyzed them: How are things done technically? What do I need to master as a photographer? How do I need to act in order to enable these scenes and moments to unfold in front of me? I must not attract attention. Which challenges the use of a 35 mm lens. So, I have to be even more unobtrusive. This technique is a big part of my work. I don`t use zoom lenses, but I walk instead. And I know how I need to move.

“To me it`s important to show what`s happening in a genuine way, to truly document.”

photographer Daniela Reske

Don`t you find that oftentimes people are immediately alarmed when they feel a camera pointed at them, either looking straight into the camera or turning away?

Often you can catch a funny moment when a person looks straight into the camera in just that moment when you want to press the shutter. When there`s a lot of interaction it`s easier for me. The more hustle and bustle the better. But I generally act very unobtrusive and am hardly noticed. However, at weddings, people are dressed up and want to be photographed. Because of its defined context, a wedding is an opportunity for many good photos – it certainly is different from going into town to take pictures.

What makes a good picture for you?

If it tells a story and if it`s touching – moving in any way and be it in a negative way. Of course, I`m pleased if the composition and light are right, too. But not the perfect picture is the good one. A trivial subject matter that`s captured with perfection often contains no emotion. A good picture is the one that conveys feeling and communicates the moment.

So you can overlook flaws, for example when something is out of focus what really should be in focus?

If a potentially good picture is so blurred that I can`t use it, that of course annoys me. As I work a lot with my aperture wide open, it happens often, that something isn`t quite perfectly in focus. I can handle that. I think of the movies, where the focus is moved to the ear for the skin to look smoother. You must not be a perfectionist when doing documentaries, otherwise, you`ll end up unhappy. A picture has to communicate a strong story and strike a chord with the viewer. Everything else is a minor matter. That`s what I like about reportage.

photographer Daniela Reske
Photographer Daniela Reske

Do you sometimes have nightmares about missing important moments at a photo event?

The evidently important moments, like the kiss after the wedding ceremony, are certainly must-haves. When it comes to these moments, I take no risks, but I don`t expect any artistic masterpieces either. The truly brilliant pictures are captured in other situations. You cannot be everywhere at the same time, you can`t get everything, because so much is happening simultaneously. I am alert and focused and I pay close attention to what`s going on around me. At a wedding, I`m with the couple already in the morning, when they prepare for the day. I then notice which people are most important to them, who have a special relationship with them. Those, I want to capture often. I don`t search for moments, but I keep my eyes and my mind wide open.

During conventional photo shoots, narrative moments don`t necessarily happen just like that. Nevertheless, you manage to maintain your expressive imagery…

Generally, I try to keep photoshoots as natural as possible. I don`t have a plan of how the people are supposed to look in the photos. I always try to find out, what they are here for, and what attracted them to my images. In my photos, I try to reveal relationships. I don`t dictate poses. I set the context in order to allow the happenings to unfold freely. It`s very important that I show up easy-going, confident, and relaxed. So that the people in front of the camera can let go. If I`m insecure the shooting is not going to succeed. Confidence comes with practice though.

After twelve years working as a photographer you probably have a lot of that – say, how did you get into photography at all?

At school, we built a Camera Obscura, a pinhole camera. I was completely in awe. I have always been a visual person. When I had my daughter, I started to photograph her. A friend asked me to photograph her wedding. That`s how I got to my first portfolio images. Before I had been working in marketing and I was very media-savvy. That helped me to become visible and prominent as a self-employed creative.

Photographer Daniela Reske

“In my photos, I try to reveal relationships.”

What have your biggest challenges as a photographer been?

I find it difficult when people have a fixed image of how they want to come across. This is especially common in the business sector. I then feel like I have to put them in a costume, which I can`t. A challenge for every photographer is peoples` harsh self-criticism. Sometimes, while I`m photographing someone, that person points out that certain flaws can be retouched later. That`s when I start to communicate that I`m not here to make them slimmer. Of course, I picture everyone in an appealing, aesthetically pleasing way. If people aren`t at peace with themselves, I can`t do anything about that as a photographer though. I see the opposite, too: Last year, I had beautiful shootings with women, who told me that they wanted to be photographed because they feel they`re now at peace with themselves.

You were the co-author of a book and you initiated workshops – are there any new projects on the horizon?

When the situation allows it, I will certainly offer workshops again. Together with a friend and colleague, I have opened an online shop where we sell prints. And I`m sure we`ll do some exhibitions again.

„Du darfst bei Reportagen nicht perfektionistisch sein“

„Du darfst bei Reportagen nicht perfektionistisch sein“

photographer Daniela Reske

Im Gespräch mit Daniela Reske

Endlich beginne ich, was ich schon lange vorhatte: Eine lose Interviewserie mit Kreativen, deren Arbeit ich beeindruckend finde – Fotografen, Modedesigner und andere Künstler. Es gibt so viel zu lernen! Generell möchte ich mir angewöhnen, viele Fragen zu stellen und vor allem gut zuzuhören. Mein erstes Interview ist mit einer meiner Lieblingsfotografinnen: Daniela Reske. Sie hat ihr Atelier in Reutlingen-Oferdingen, reist aber auch schon mal ins Ausland, um Hochzeiten zu dokumentieren. Ihre Bilder sind wie Kino – einzigartige Erzählwelten, voller Gefühl und besonderer Augenblicke. Wir haben uns in ihrem Atelier getroffen, einem ehemaligen Bootshaus am Fluss mit riesigen alten Fenstern und gemütlichem Kaminfeuer.

Daniela, wenn ich mir deine Arbeiten anschaue, komme ich mir vor wie in einem Film, den man immer weiter schauen möchte. Wie bist du zu deiner besonderen Bildsprache gekommen?

Mich hat schon immer das Journalistische interessiert – Bilder, die im Moment passieren. Als ich vor zwölf Jahren als Fotografin begonnen habe, war die Hochzeitsreportage noch nicht so etabliert. Es gab nur eine Handvoll Fotografen, die das gemacht haben. In den USA gab es die Bewegung schon länger, dass der ganze Tag begleitet und dokumentiert wird. Heute ist die Reportage im Hochzeitsbereich ja fast Standard. Ich fand die Idee schön, dass das es am Ende ein Album gibt, mit dem man diesen besonderen Tag nacherleben kann. Wann sind Freunde und Familie schon mal alle zusammen? Wichtig ist mir, das Geschehen so festzuhalten, wie es tatsächlich passiert ist – also wirkliche Reportage-Arbeit.

Wie setzt du das praktisch um?

Ich fotografiere mit 35 mm Festbrennweite. Dadurch wirken die Bilder sehr filmisch. Statt klassischen Portraits, fange ich eher Szenen ein. Ich habe mir Sachen angeschaut, die mir gefallen haben und habe mir dann überlegt: Wie ist das technisch gelöst? Was muss ich als Fotografin können? Wie muss ich mich verhalten, damit diese Szenen und Momente vor mir geschehen können? Ich muss unauffällig sein. Das steht eigentlich im Widerspruch zu den 35 mm, also erfordert es noch mehr Zurückhaltung von mir. Die Technik ist ein großer Teil meiner Arbeit. Ich zoome nicht, sondern laufe. Und ich weiß, wie ich mich bewegen muss.

“Wichtig ist mir, das Geschehen so festzuhalten, wie es tatsächlich passiert ist – also wirkliche Reportage-Arbeit.”

photographer Daniela Reske

Geht es dir nicht oft so, dass Leute sofort verschreckt her – oder weg – schauen, sobald eine Kamera auf sie gerichtet wird?

Oft erwischt man einen witzigen Moment, wenn eine Person gerade in die Kamera schaut. Wenn viel Miteinander stattfindet, ist es einfacher für mich. Je trubeliger, desto besser. Aber ich verhalte mich eben sehr zurückhaltend und werde dann fast nicht mehr wahrgenommen. Auf Hochzeiten ist es außerdem so, dass sich alle schön zurechtgemacht haben. Die Leute wollen dann auch fotografiert werden. Durch den definierten Rahmen ermöglicht eine Hochzeit immer viele gute Bilder – anders als würde man einfach in die Stadt gehen und fotografieren.

Was macht für dich ein gutes Bild aus?

Wenn es eine Geschichte erzählt und berührt – auf irgendeine Art und Weise, das kann auch negativ sein. Natürlich freut es mich, wenn dazu noch Komposition und Licht stimmen. Aber nicht das perfekte Bild ist das Gute, sondern das emotionale Bild, das den Moment rüberbringt. Ein gewöhnliches Motiv, bei dem alles perfektioniert ist, hat dagegen oft keine Emotion.

Dann kannst du also gut darüber hinwegsehen, wenn zum Beispiel mal was nicht ganz scharf ist, was eigentlich im Fokus sein sollte?

Wenn ein potentiell gutes Bild unbrauchbar unscharf ist, ärgert es mich natürlich. Ich arbeite viel offenblendig, da passiert es schnell, dass der Fokus nicht perfekt ist. Damit kann ich gut umgehen. Ich denke da an den Film, bei dem absichtlich der Fokus aufs Ohr gelegt wird, damit die Haut schöner wirkt. Du darfst bei Reportagen nicht perfektionistisch sein, sonst wirst du unglücklich. Ein Bild soll starke Geschichten erzählen und emotional berühren, das andere ist Nebensache. Gerade das mag ich an der Reportage.

photographer Daniela Reske

Hast du manchmal Alpträume, wichtige Momente eines Fotoevents zu verpassen?

Die vordergründig wichtigen Momente, wie der Kuss nach der Trauung, sind natürlich Must-Haves. Da gehe ich einfach auf Sicherheit und erwarte keine großen Kunstwerke. Die wirklich guten Bilder mache ich an anderen Stellen. Du kannst nicht immer überall sein, kannst nicht alles erwischen, denn es geschieht ja so viel gleichzeitig. Ich bin aufmerksam und fokussiert und achte darauf, was um mich herum passiert. Weil ich schon morgens bei den Vorbereitungen dabei bin, bekomme ich mit, wer die wichtigen Menschen im Umfeld des Paares sind, wer einen besonderen Bezug hat. Da schaue ich, dass die oft festgehalten sind. Ich suche die Momente nicht, sondern ich halte Augen und Geist offen.

Bei klassischen Fotoshootings kommen erzählende Momente nicht unbedingt von selbst. Trotzdem schaffst du es auch da, deine ausdrucksstarke Bildsprache beizubehalten...

Auch Fotoshootings versuche ich so natürlich wie möglich zu halten. Ich habe keinen Plan im Kopf, wie die Menschen auf den Bildern aussehen sollen. Ich versuche immer herauszufinden, warum sie hier sind, was sie an meinen Fotos angezogen hat. Auf den Bildern versuche ich, Beziehungen zu zeigen und gebe keine Posen vor. Ich konstruiere den Rahmen, um dann möglichst viel dem Geschehen selbst zu überlassen. Wichtig ist, dass ich als Fotografin Coolness, Selbstverständlichkeit und Entspanntheit mitbringe, damit die Menschen vor der Kamera loslassen können. Wenn ich unsicher bin, wird das Shooting nichts. Sicherheit kommt aber mit Übung.

Davon hast du nach zwölf Jahren als Fotografin bestimmt viel - sag mal, wie bist du eigentlich überhaupt zur Fotografie gekommen?

In der Schule haben wir eine Kamera Obscura gebaut, das hat mich total begeistert. Ich war immer ein visueller Mensch. Als meine Tochter da war, habe ich angefangen, sie zu fotografieren. Eine Freundin hat mich gefragt, ob ich ihre Hochzeit fotografiere und so hatte ich meine ersten Bilder. Vorher habe ich im Marketing gearbeitet und ich war sehr medienaffin. Das hat mir als selbständige Kreative geholfen, sichtbar zu werden.

photographer Daniela Reske

“Auf meinen Bildern versuche ich, Beziehungen zu zeigen.”

Was waren oder sind deine größten Herausforderungen als Fotografin?

Schwierig wird es, wenn Menschen eine zu konkrete Vorstellung davon haben, wie sie wirken möchten. Das kommt vor allem im Business-Bereich vor. Ich habe dann das Gefühl, ich muss ihnen ein Kostüm anziehen, was ich ja gar nicht kann. Eine Herausforderung für jeden Fotografen ist, dass Menschen oft sehr selbstkritisch sind. Manche weisen schon während des Shootings darauf hin, dass man ja retuschieren könne. Da fange ich bereits an, zu vermitteln, dass ich als Fotograf nicht dazu da bin, sie schlanker zu machen. Natürlich fotografiere ich jeden schön und ästhetisch ansprechend. Wenn Menschen mit sich selbst nicht im Reinen sind, dann kann ich da als Fotograf nichts machen. Ich erlebe auch das Gegenteil: Letztes Jahr hatte ich sehr schöne Shootings mit Frauen, die sagten, sie wollen intimere Fotos von sich, weil sie jetzt mit sich im Reinen sind.

Du hast ja bereits an einem Buch mitgeschrieben, hast Workshops initiiert – gibt`s gerade neue Projekte bei dir?

Wenn es die Situation zulässt, werde ich in Zukunft sicher wieder Workshops anbieten. Mit einem Freund und Kollegen habe ich letztes Jahr einen Onlineshop eröffnet, über den wir Prints verkaufen. Und wir werden bestimmt auch wieder Ausstellungen machen.

photographer Daniela Reske
photographer Daniela Reske

2 Replies to “Daniela Reske”

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.