Daniela Reske

photographer Daniela Reske

„You mustn`t be a perfectionist when doing documentaries“

„You mustn`t be a perfectionist when doing documentary“

photographer Daniela Reske

In Conversation with Daniela Reske

Finally, I start what I`ve had in my mind for a while now: Every now and then I want to interview creatives whose work I find inspiring – photographers, fashion designers and other artists. We can learn so much from each other! Generally, I want to get into the habit of asking questions and most importantly of truly listening. My first interview for this blog is with one of my very favourite photographers, Daniela Reske. She has her studio in Reutlingen-Oferdingen/Germany, and documents weddings internationally. Her pictures are like cinema – one-of-a-kind storyworlds filled with feeling and special moments. We met in her studio, a former boathouse by a river with huge old windows and a cozy fireplace.

Daniela, when I look at your work, I feel like in a movie that I want to keep on watching. How did you get to your unique visual language?

I have always been intrigued by journalism, by pictures that are conveying the moment. When I started out as a photographer twelve years ago, the reportage approach in weddings wasn`t mainstream yet. It was offered by only a few photographers. In the US this approach of documenting the entire day had been common for some time though. Today, wedding documentaries are pretty much standard. I loved the idea of having a photo album that enables people to relive that special day. When are friends and family ever all together? To me it`s important to show what`s happening in a genuine way, to truly document.

How do you put that into practice?

I use a 35 mm prime lens. That makes my pictures look very cinematic. Instead of the typical portrait, I rather capture scenes. I have looked at photographs that I liked and analyzed them: How are things done technically? What do I need to master as a photographer? How do I need to act in order to enable these scenes and moments to unfold in front of me? I must not attract attention. Which challenges the use of a 35 mm lens. So, I have to be even more unobtrusive. This technique is a big part of my work. I don`t use zoom lenses, but I walk instead. And I know how I need to move.

“To me it`s important to show what`s happening in a genuine way, to truly document.”

photographer Daniela Reske

Don`t you find that oftentimes people are immediately alarmed when they feel a camera pointed at them, either looking straight into the camera or turning away?

Often you can catch a funny moment when a person looks straight into the camera in just that moment when you want to press the shutter. When there`s a lot of interaction it`s easier for me. The more hustle and bustle the better. But I generally act very unobtrusive and am hardly noticed. However, at weddings, people are dressed up and want to be photographed. Because of its defined context, a wedding is an opportunity for many good photos – it certainly is different from going into town to take pictures.

What makes a good picture for you?

If it tells a story and if it`s touching – moving in any way and be it in a negative way. Of course, I`m pleased if the composition and light are right, too. But not the perfect picture is the good one. A trivial subject matter that`s captured with perfection often contains no emotion. A good picture is the one that conveys feeling and communicates the moment.

So you can overlook flaws, for example when something is out of focus what really should be in focus?

If a potentially good picture is so blurred that I can`t use it, that of course annoys me. As I work a lot with my aperture wide open, it happens often, that something isn`t quite perfectly in focus. I can handle that. I think of the movies, where the focus is moved to the ear for the skin to look smoother. You must not be a perfectionist when doing documentaries, otherwise, you`ll end up unhappy. A picture has to communicate a strong story and strike a chord with the viewer. Everything else is a minor matter. That`s what I like about reportage.

photographer Daniela Reske
Photographer Daniela Reske

Do you sometimes have nightmares about missing important moments at a photo event?

The evidently important moments, like the kiss after the wedding ceremony, are certainly must-haves. When it comes to these moments, I take no risks, but I don`t expect any artistic masterpieces either. The truly brilliant pictures are captured in other situations. You cannot be everywhere at the same time, you can`t get everything, because so much is happening simultaneously. I am alert and focused and I pay close attention to what`s going on around me. At a wedding, I`m with the couple already in the morning, when they prepare for the day. I then notice which people are most important to them, who have a special relationship with them. Those, I want to capture often. I don`t search for moments, but I keep my eyes and my mind wide open.

During conventional photo shoots, narrative moments don`t necessarily happen just like that. Nevertheless, you manage to maintain your expressive imagery…

Generally, I try to keep photoshoots as natural as possible. I don`t have a plan of how the people are supposed to look in the photos. I always try to find out, what they are here for, and what attracted them to my images. In my photos, I try to reveal relationships. I don`t dictate poses. I set the context in order to allow the happenings to unfold freely. It`s very important that I show up easy-going, confident, and relaxed. So that the people in front of the camera can let go. If I`m insecure the shooting is not going to succeed. Confidence comes with practice though.

After twelve years working as a photographer you probably have a lot of that – say, how did you get into photography at all?

At school, we built a Camera Obscura, a pinhole camera. I was completely in awe. I have always been a visual person. When I had my daughter, I started to photograph her. A friend asked me to photograph her wedding. That`s how I got to my first portfolio images. Before I had been working in marketing and I was very media-savvy. That helped me to become visible and prominent as a self-employed creative.

Photographer Daniela Reske

“In my photos, I try to reveal relationships.”

What have your biggest challenges as a photographer been?

I find it difficult when people have a fixed image of how they want to come across. This is especially common in the business sector. I then feel like I have to put them in a costume, which I can`t. A challenge for every photographer is peoples` harsh self-criticism. Sometimes, while I`m photographing someone, that person points out that certain flaws can be retouched later. That`s when I start to communicate that I`m not here to make them slimmer. Of course, I picture everyone in an appealing, aesthetically pleasing way. If people aren`t at peace with themselves, I can`t do anything about that as a photographer though. I see the opposite, too: Last year, I had beautiful shootings with women, who told me that they wanted to be photographed because they feel they`re now at peace with themselves.

You were the co-author of a book and you initiated workshops – are there any new projects on the horizon?

When the situation allows it, I will certainly offer workshops again. Together with a friend and colleague, I have opened an online shop where we sell prints. And I`m sure we`ll do some exhibitions again.

„Du darfst bei Reportagen nicht perfektionistisch sein“

„Du darfst bei Reportagen nicht perfektionistisch sein“

photographer Daniela Reske

Im Gespräch mit Daniela Reske

Endlich beginne ich, was ich schon lange vorhatte: Eine lose Interviewserie mit Kreativen, deren Arbeit ich beeindruckend finde – Fotografen, Modedesigner und andere Künstler. Es gibt so viel zu lernen! Generell möchte ich mir angewöhnen, viele Fragen zu stellen und vor allem gut zuzuhören. Mein erstes Interview ist mit einer meiner Lieblingsfotografinnen: Daniela Reske. Sie hat ihr Atelier in Reutlingen-Oferdingen, reist aber auch schon mal ins Ausland, um Hochzeiten zu dokumentieren. Ihre Bilder sind wie Kino – einzigartige Erzählwelten, voller Gefühl und besonderer Augenblicke. Wir haben uns in ihrem Atelier getroffen, einem ehemaligen Bootshaus am Fluss mit riesigen alten Fenstern und gemütlichem Kaminfeuer.

Daniela, wenn ich mir deine Arbeiten anschaue, komme ich mir vor wie in einem Film, den man immer weiter schauen möchte. Wie bist du zu deiner besonderen Bildsprache gekommen?

Mich hat schon immer das Journalistische interessiert – Bilder, die im Moment passieren. Als ich vor zwölf Jahren als Fotografin begonnen habe, war die Hochzeitsreportage noch nicht so etabliert. Es gab nur eine Handvoll Fotografen, die das gemacht haben. In den USA gab es die Bewegung schon länger, dass der ganze Tag begleitet und dokumentiert wird. Heute ist die Reportage im Hochzeitsbereich ja fast Standard. Ich fand die Idee schön, dass das es am Ende ein Album gibt, mit dem man diesen besonderen Tag nacherleben kann. Wann sind Freunde und Familie schon mal alle zusammen? Wichtig ist mir, das Geschehen so festzuhalten, wie es tatsächlich passiert ist – also wirkliche Reportage-Arbeit.

Wie setzt du das praktisch um?

Ich fotografiere mit 35 mm Festbrennweite. Dadurch wirken die Bilder sehr filmisch. Statt klassischen Portraits, fange ich eher Szenen ein. Ich habe mir Sachen angeschaut, die mir gefallen haben und habe mir dann überlegt: Wie ist das technisch gelöst? Was muss ich als Fotografin können? Wie muss ich mich verhalten, damit diese Szenen und Momente vor mir geschehen können? Ich muss unauffällig sein. Das steht eigentlich im Widerspruch zu den 35 mm, also erfordert es noch mehr Zurückhaltung von mir. Die Technik ist ein großer Teil meiner Arbeit. Ich zoome nicht, sondern laufe. Und ich weiß, wie ich mich bewegen muss.

“Wichtig ist mir, das Geschehen so festzuhalten, wie es tatsächlich passiert ist – also wirkliche Reportage-Arbeit.”

photographer Daniela Reske

Geht es dir nicht oft so, dass Leute sofort verschreckt her – oder weg – schauen, sobald eine Kamera auf sie gerichtet wird?

Oft erwischt man einen witzigen Moment, wenn eine Person gerade in die Kamera schaut. Wenn viel Miteinander stattfindet, ist es einfacher für mich. Je trubeliger, desto besser. Aber ich verhalte mich eben sehr zurückhaltend und werde dann fast nicht mehr wahrgenommen. Auf Hochzeiten ist es außerdem so, dass sich alle schön zurechtgemacht haben. Die Leute wollen dann auch fotografiert werden. Durch den definierten Rahmen ermöglicht eine Hochzeit immer viele gute Bilder – anders als würde man einfach in die Stadt gehen und fotografieren.

Was macht für dich ein gutes Bild aus?

Wenn es eine Geschichte erzählt und berührt – auf irgendeine Art und Weise, das kann auch negativ sein. Natürlich freut es mich, wenn dazu noch Komposition und Licht stimmen. Aber nicht das perfekte Bild ist das Gute, sondern das emotionale Bild, das den Moment rüberbringt. Ein gewöhnliches Motiv, bei dem alles perfektioniert ist, hat dagegen oft keine Emotion.

Dann kannst du also gut darüber hinwegsehen, wenn zum Beispiel mal was nicht ganz scharf ist, was eigentlich im Fokus sein sollte?

Wenn ein potentiell gutes Bild unbrauchbar unscharf ist, ärgert es mich natürlich. Ich arbeite viel offenblendig, da passiert es schnell, dass der Fokus nicht perfekt ist. Damit kann ich gut umgehen. Ich denke da an den Film, bei dem absichtlich der Fokus aufs Ohr gelegt wird, damit die Haut schöner wirkt. Du darfst bei Reportagen nicht perfektionistisch sein, sonst wirst du unglücklich. Ein Bild soll starke Geschichten erzählen und emotional berühren, das andere ist Nebensache. Gerade das mag ich an der Reportage.

photographer Daniela Reske

Hast du manchmal Alpträume, wichtige Momente eines Fotoevents zu verpassen?

Die vordergründig wichtigen Momente, wie der Kuss nach der Trauung, sind natürlich Must-Haves. Da gehe ich einfach auf Sicherheit und erwarte keine großen Kunstwerke. Die wirklich guten Bilder mache ich an anderen Stellen. Du kannst nicht immer überall sein, kannst nicht alles erwischen, denn es geschieht ja so viel gleichzeitig. Ich bin aufmerksam und fokussiert und achte darauf, was um mich herum passiert. Weil ich schon morgens bei den Vorbereitungen dabei bin, bekomme ich mit, wer die wichtigen Menschen im Umfeld des Paares sind, wer einen besonderen Bezug hat. Da schaue ich, dass die oft festgehalten sind. Ich suche die Momente nicht, sondern ich halte Augen und Geist offen.

Bei klassischen Fotoshootings kommen erzählende Momente nicht unbedingt von selbst. Trotzdem schaffst du es auch da, deine ausdrucksstarke Bildsprache beizubehalten...

Auch Fotoshootings versuche ich so natürlich wie möglich zu halten. Ich habe keinen Plan im Kopf, wie die Menschen auf den Bildern aussehen sollen. Ich versuche immer herauszufinden, warum sie hier sind, was sie an meinen Fotos angezogen hat. Auf den Bildern versuche ich, Beziehungen zu zeigen und gebe keine Posen vor. Ich konstruiere den Rahmen, um dann möglichst viel dem Geschehen selbst zu überlassen. Wichtig ist, dass ich als Fotografin Coolness, Selbstverständlichkeit und Entspanntheit mitbringe, damit die Menschen vor der Kamera loslassen können. Wenn ich unsicher bin, wird das Shooting nichts. Sicherheit kommt aber mit Übung.

Davon hast du nach zwölf Jahren als Fotografin bestimmt viel - sag mal, wie bist du eigentlich überhaupt zur Fotografie gekommen?

In der Schule haben wir eine Kamera Obscura gebaut, das hat mich total begeistert. Ich war immer ein visueller Mensch. Als meine Tochter da war, habe ich angefangen, sie zu fotografieren. Eine Freundin hat mich gefragt, ob ich ihre Hochzeit fotografiere und so hatte ich meine ersten Bilder. Vorher habe ich im Marketing gearbeitet und ich war sehr medienaffin. Das hat mir als selbständige Kreative geholfen, sichtbar zu werden.

photographer Daniela Reske

“Auf meinen Bildern versuche ich, Beziehungen zu zeigen.”

Was waren oder sind deine größten Herausforderungen als Fotografin?

Schwierig wird es, wenn Menschen eine zu konkrete Vorstellung davon haben, wie sie wirken möchten. Das kommt vor allem im Business-Bereich vor. Ich habe dann das Gefühl, ich muss ihnen ein Kostüm anziehen, was ich ja gar nicht kann. Eine Herausforderung für jeden Fotografen ist, dass Menschen oft sehr selbstkritisch sind. Manche weisen schon während des Shootings darauf hin, dass man ja retuschieren könne. Da fange ich bereits an, zu vermitteln, dass ich als Fotograf nicht dazu da bin, sie schlanker zu machen. Natürlich fotografiere ich jeden schön und ästhetisch ansprechend. Wenn Menschen mit sich selbst nicht im Reinen sind, dann kann ich da als Fotograf nichts machen. Ich erlebe auch das Gegenteil: Letztes Jahr hatte ich sehr schöne Shootings mit Frauen, die sagten, sie wollen intimere Fotos von sich, weil sie jetzt mit sich im Reinen sind.

Du hast ja bereits an einem Buch mitgeschrieben, hast Workshops initiiert – gibt`s gerade neue Projekte bei dir?

Wenn es die Situation zulässt, werde ich in Zukunft sicher wieder Workshops anbieten. Mit einem Freund und Kollegen habe ich letztes Jahr einen Onlineshop eröffnet, über den wir Prints verkaufen. Und wir werden bestimmt auch wieder Ausstellungen machen.

photographer Daniela Reske
photographer Daniela Reske

Networking

people networking

Networking

Are you a good in-person-networker? As a freelancer, this is so important. And it`s not only because a strong network can open doors for us. But it`s about making use of the brain, ideas, and wisdom of many, not just our own.

By asking and listening we can find new ideas and broaden our understanding. We have a limited view on things, the world, everything – based on OUR experience. Other people bring in THEIR experiences and the resulting ideas and connections. So, this is gonna broaden our view and our opportunities big time.

Plus, being well connected feels like a safety net and will ultimately make us braver. There are people having our back and cheering us on.

Consider everybody

Our network is way bigger than we might think: Think of everyone you know – family, friends, and co-workers of course, but as well neighbours, people in your yoga class, people you meet on jobs, …  Then think of everyone these persons know, who you could be introduced to if needed. Consider everybody, not just seemingly “influential” people. Because everybody has something to teach. Plus, each person knows people that may turn out to be game-changers for you.

And then of course there`s the most basic and most important connection to God who can do crazy, unbelievable stuff and comes up with the best surprises – and who introduces us to those people that we need in our lives.

people in coffeeshop networking

To be honest, networking doesn`t exactly come naturally and easy to me. I`m a bit of a shy character and tend to be anxious that I might bother someone. But I`m learning. I`ve written the following list as kind of a reminder and instruction for myself. And perhaps this could be useful for you, too.

Here are some ideas, how to make the most of your network:

Be helpful whenever you can.

Ask if there`s something that you can do for people. Because the helping part of networking is the most fun. Don`t we all love it if we can be useful, make a difference to someone, and be able to help within our capabilities! It`s a happiness booster.

Be open and authentic.

Let other people in on your journey, don`t be superficial, and don`t try to pretend all is fine and dandy when it`s not.

Ask for what you need.

In order to do this, you would of course need to know what exactly you need first. So, maybe you need to find that out first. Perhaps it`s an idea concerning a certain issue or maybe it`s a connection to a certain business sector. Be specific to make it easy for the other person to help you. For example, ask: “Do you by chance know somebody who works in the pattern department of a fashion company?” The person might say: “Hm, actually I know someone who knows someone…” – and there we go.

Be open to suggestions.

When someone proposes something don`t say: “Well, BUT…” Take it in, consider and try it. Remember that they have experiences that you haven`t had and appreciate that they are willing to let you in on them. You never know, in hindsight this suggestion might be the one that helped you on the next step.

Listen and shut your cakehole.

Encourage the others to share their knowledge by truly listening. “You need to enter every conversation assuming that you have something to learn”, says Celeste Headlee in her TED-talk https://www.ted.com/talks/celeste_headlee_10_ways_to_have_a_better_conversation: “Everyone you will ever meet knows something that you don`t.” And: “I keep my mouth shut as often as I possibly can, I keep my mind open, and I`, always prepared to be amazed.”

Take notes.

Note each and every suggestion down in your notebook. Especially names and numbers. Otherwise, you`ll forget them or misplace them. Some might seem insignificant to you at the moment. But at a later point on your journey, after having gained more understanding and insight, you might find them super useful all of a sudden.

Don`t think you`re a burden.

Usually, people love to help with their expertise and connections. To most of us, it`s not a burden but a pleasure to be able to help. Barbara Sher writes in her book “Wishcraft” http://wishcraft.com/: “Most of us remember and treasure every part we’ve ever played in someone else’s survival, satisfaction, or success. …It’s because helping each other is creative and it makes us feel good.”

Give Feedback.

Let other people know about your experiences with their suggestions down the road.  Tell them about the phone call to that connection that they`ve given you. “It is a great way to show your interest and your respect for someone else’s opinion, it energizes your relationship, it shows someone: I`m listening to you, I pay attention to what you say, I value what you say,” says Gretchen Rubin on her podcast “Happier with Gretchen Rubin” https://gretchenrubin.com/podcast-episode/309-heed-a-suggestion-listeners-21-for-2021. Her sister Elizabeth Craft adds: “If you take on a suggestion, you`re giving someone else the pleasure of giving. It makes them feel good to know they gave you something valuable.” Plus, feedback creates accountability for you, because you don`t want to let those down, who cheer you on.  

What are your thoughts and experiences with networking? Are you a natural networker or does it demand some effort of you?

Networking

Bist du gut darin, dir ein persönliches Netzwerk zu bauen und zu nutzen? Für Freiberufler ist das so wichtig. Und nicht nur, weil uns ein starkes Netzwerk Türen öffnen kann. Sondern auch weil wir so die Köpfe, Ideen und Weisheit vieler nutzen können, nicht nur unsere eigenen.

Indem wir fragen und zuhören können wir an neue Ideen kommen und unsere Einsicht weiten. Wir haben alle einen eingeschränkten Blick auf Dinge, auf die Welt, auf alles – einen Blick, der auf UNSEREN Erfahrungen basiert. Andere bringen IHRE Erfahrungen ein und die daraus entstandenen Ideen und Verbindungen. Das wird unsere Einsicht und unsere Möglichkeiten erweitern.

Außerdem fühlt es sich ein gutes Netzwerk wie ein Sicherheitsnetz an, das uns mutiger macht. Da sind Leute, die hinter uns stehen und die uns anfeuern.

Denk an jeden

Unser Netzwerk ist viel größer als wir vielleicht denken: Denk an jeden, den du kennst – natürlich Familie, Freunde und Kollegen, aber auch Nachbarn, Leute in deinem Yoga-Kurs, Leute, die du auf Jobs triffst, … Dann denk an alle, die diese Leute kennen – und denen sie dich vorstellen könnten. Berücksichtige jeden, nicht nur solche, die dir “einflussreich” erscheinen. Denn von jedem kann man etwas lernen. Außerdem kennt jeder Leute, die unter Umständen einen großen Unterschied in unserem Leben machen könnten.

Und dann ist da natürlich die grundlegendste und wichtigste Beziehung zu Gott, der die verrücktesten und unglaublichsten Sachen möglich machen kann und die besten Überraschungen für uns bereithält. Und der uns den Leuten vorstellt, die wir in unserem Leben brauchen.  

mirror nice to meet you networking

Ehrlich gesagt, bin ich nicht gerade der geborene Networker, dem das leichtfällt. Ich bin eher der schüchterne Typ und befürchte, jemandem Last zu sein. Aber ja, ich lerne! Die folgende Liste habe ich mir als Erinnerung und Anleitung geschrieben. Vielleicht ist sie für dich auch nützlich.

Hier sind ein paar Ideen, wie wir unser Netzwerk gut nutzen können:

Hilf wann immer du kannst.

Frag, ob es etwas gibt, was du für jemanden tun kannst. Denn Helfen ist das, was am Netzwerken am meisten Spaß macht. Ist es nicht das beste Gefühl, wenn wir für jemanden einen Unterschied machen können und innerhalb unserer Möglichkeiten helfen können! Das ist ein Glücklichmacher.

Sei offen und authentisch.

Beziehe andere auf deinem Weg ein, sei nicht oberflächlich und versuche nicht vorzugeben, das alles super ist, wenn es nicht so ist.

Frag nach dem, was du brauchst.

Um das zu tun, müssen wir uns natürlich erstmal darüber im Klaren sein, was wir denn brauchen. Eventuell müssen wir uns das erstmal überlegen. Vielleicht ist es eine Idee zu einem Thema. Oder eine Verbindung zu einem bestimmten Geschäftsbereich. Sei möglichst präzise, denn das macht es dem anderen einfacher, dir zu helfen. Frag zum Beispiel: “Kennst du zufällig jemanden, der in der Schnittabteilung eines Modeunternehmens arbeitet?” Die Person könnte dann sagen: “Hm, tatsächlich kenne ich jemanden, der jemanden kennt…” – und schon gibt`s eine Spur.

Sei offen für Vorschläge.

Wenn jemand etwas vorschlägt, sag nicht “Ja, ABER…” Nimm den Vorschlag an, bedenke ihn und probier ihn aus. Denk daran, dass andere Erfahrungen haben, die du nicht hast. Und schätze, dass sie so nett sind, dich an ihren Erfahrungen teilhaben zu lassen. Wer weiß, im Nachhinein könnte gerade dieser Vorschlag der gewesen sein, der dir auf deinem nächsten Schritt geholfen hat.

Hör zu und lass den Mund zu.

Ermutige andere ihr Wissen mit dir zu teilen, indem du wirklich zuhörst. „Gehe in jede Unterhaltung mit der Annahme, dass du etwas lernen kannst”, sagt Celeste Headlee in ihrem TED-Talk https://www.ted.com/talks/celeste_headlee_10_ways_to_have_a_better_conversation: „Jeder, den du triffst, weiß etwas, das du nicht weißt.” Und: “Ich lasse meinen Mund zu so oft ich kann, ich bin aufgeschlossen und unvoreingenommen – und ich bin immer darauf vorbereitet, zu staunen.“

Mach dir Notizen.

Notiere dir jeden einzelnen Tipp in deinem Notizbuch. Vor allem Namen und Nummern. Sonst vergisst du sie oder verlegst sie. Manche Vorschläge kommen dir im Moment vielleicht unbedeutend vor. Aber später, wenn du mehr Einsichten gewonnen hast, könntest du sie auf einmal super nützlich finden.

Denk nicht, dass du eine Last bist.

Normalerweise freuen sich Leute, wenn sie mit ihrem Fachwissen und ihren Beziehungen helfen können. Für die meisten von uns ist es keine Last, sondern ein Vergnügen, wenn wir die Möglichkeit haben hilfreich zu sein. Barbara Sher schreibt in ihrem Buch “Wishcraft” http://wishcraft.com/: Die meisten von uns erinnern sich gern daran, wenn sie in irgendjemandes Leben eine Rolle spielten, die zu Erfolg geführt hat. … Deshalb, weil gegenseitiges Helfen eine kreative Handlung ist und wir uns dabei gut fühlen.“

Gib Rückmeldung.

Erzähl anderen von deinen Erfahrungen mit ihren Vorschlägen. Zum Beispiel von dem Telefonat mit der Person, die sie dir empfohlen haben anzurufen. Gretchen Rubin sagt in ihrem Podcast „Happier with Gretchen Rubin“ https://gretchenrubin.com/podcast-episode/309-heed-a-suggestion-listeners-21-for-2021: „Das ist eine tolle Möglichkeit, dem anderen dein Interesse und deine Anerkennung für seine Meinung zu zeigen. Es bringt eure Beziehung in Schwung und es zeigt jemandem: Ich höre dir zu, ich gebe acht und schätze was zu sagst.“ Ihre Schwester Elizabeth Craft ergänzt: “Wenn du einen Vorschlag aufgreifst, dann gibst du dem anderen das Vergnügen des Gebens. Der andere fühlt sich gut, weil er weiß, dass er dir etwas Wertvolles geben konnte.“ Außerdem schafft ein Feedback Verbindlichkeit und du wirst deine Sache eher verfolgen. Weil du die Leute, die dich anfeuern, nicht enttäuschen möchtest.

Was sind deine Gedanken und Erfahrungen mit Netzwerken? Bist du ganz mühelos am Vernetzen oder kostet es dich manchmal Überwindung?

three birds networking

Read more:

Success-Stories https://nadinewilmanns.com/success-stories

Courage and Massive Action https://nadinewilmanns.com/massive-action

Creative work

creative work leica analog photo camera

Creative Work

How to get creative work done

One of the biggest traps for creative work is postponing. Either because of “waiting for inspiration”. Or because of perfectionism, saying “I`m not good enough yet, conditions are not ideal at the moment,…”

I`ve written about this before but it`s been one of the most important lessons for me: Creativity means commitment which implies planning your day, setting priorities, and setting aside time for them. Creative work means fight and determination. And actually doing the work now.

“Inspiration is for amateurs. The rest of us just show up and get to work”, said photographer Chuck Close. “If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself.”

No need for the perfect setting

The other day, I had an interesting interview with singer and musician Joe Vox. He has released an album together with other musicians called “COVid IDentities”. Because of the lockdown, one of the musicians didn`t have access to fancy recording technology. So he just used his phone. Simple as that.

The musicians made things work, even though conditions weren`t ideal. Joe Vox said: “As a creative, you don`t need the perfect setting. On the contrary: Too much perfection can indeed harm because you constantly find that settings aren`t ideal. And you end up doing nothing at all because of that. You can always do something when you are creative and really want to.”

Kreative Arbeit

Eine der größten Fallen für kreative Arbeit ist Aufschieberitis. Entweder weil man auf “Inspiration” wartet. Oder wegen Perfektionismus, der einem sagt “Ich bin noch nicht gut genug, die Bedingungen sind im Moment noch nicht ideal,…“

Ich habe schon mal über dieses Thema geschrieben, aber es ist eine der wichtigsten Lektionen für mich gewesen: Kreativität bedeutet Einsatz und sich zu verpflichten, Prioritäten zu setzen und dafür Zeit zu reservieren. Also den Tag entsprechend drum herum zu planen. Es bedeutet auch zu kämpfen und entschlossen zu sein. Und sich tatsächlich jetzt an die Arbeit zu machen.

„Inspiration ist was für Amateure. Wir anderen lassen uns blicken und machen uns an die Arbeit“, sagte Fotograf Chuck Close. „Wenn du darauf wartest, dass sich die Wolken auftun und dich ein Geistesblitz trifft, dann wirst du nicht besonders viel zustande bringen. All die besten Ideen kommen aus dem Prozess heraus. Sie entstehen bei der Arbeit selbst.”

Es braucht nicht die perfekten Bedingungen

Neulich hatte ich ein interessantes Interview mit Sänger und Musiker Joe Vox. Er hat ein Album “COVid Identities” mit anderen Musikern zusammen herausgebracht. Wegen des Lockdowns hatte einer der Musiker keinen Zugang zu richtiger Aufnahmetechnik. Also hat er sein Handy benutzt. Ganz einfach.

Die Musiker haben die CD möglich gemacht, auch wenn nicht alles ideal war.  Joe Vox sagte: “ Als Kreativer braucht man nicht die perfekten Bedingungen. Im Gegenteil: Zu viel Perfektion tut oft nicht gut, denn man findet dauernd, dass die Umstände nicht gut genug sind. Und am Ende kommt gar nichts bei raus. Man kann immer was machen, wenn man Kreativität hat und wirklich will.“

Success Stories

Photography black and white selfie for blog about success

Stories we tell about ourselves

How do we define success? And are we giving it our own definition, or do we let others define it for us? What story do we tell about ourselves? And are we dreaming big or do we let others limit our dreams, and what we dare to expect?

There are so many opinions and voices that can restrict us and that don`t serve us at all. For example: “Successful people are those who make a lot of money or who have fame.” If we have neither money nor fame, we might fall into the trap of thinking that we are not successful. But wait for a second: Is this definition matching our own standards of success at all?

And what kind of story do we tell about ourselves in general?

After the past two weeks, I could be telling, that I have failed a lot and that I`m unsuccessful. But honestly what would be the point of a story like this? It would not only be depressing; it also would not serve me at all.

We have one life, so why not tell a good story about it! So, instead I say: “I have taken some bold steps lately. At the same time, I`ve gained a good deal of experience with criticism both fair and unfair, even some unfriendliness. Either way, I`ve learned a lot. Most of all, I haven`t let anything cause me to abandon my dreams and I keep dreaming big. I expect great opportunities and adventures coming my way because I trust God to have a good plan for me.”

Selfie with dog

A friend of mine said to me that her co-worker has warned her: “In our job, we have to be very flexible.” There are so many ideas and opinions about how we SHOULD be. But especially as creatives I think we don`t have to accept the boundaries of common opinions. If we work to our own heart’s content, not for the judgment of others, we work with the heart of an artist. And we can accomplish a lot and more, if we just never lose faith, tell our story favourably, and define success in a way that sustains us and doesn`t discourage us.

Stories, die wir über uns erzählen

Was ist Erfolg? Legen wir für uns selbst fest, was Erfolg für uns bedeutet, oder lassen wir uns das von anderen vorgeben? Was für eine Geschichte erzählen wir von uns? Und haben wir große Träume, oder lassen wir uns von anderen Grenzen setzen, in dem was wir uns zutrauen?

Es gibt so viele Meinungen und Stimmen, die uns einschränken können und die uns überhaupt nicht nützlich sind. Zum Beispiel: „Erfolgreiche Leute verdienen viel Geld und sind angesehen und bekannt.“ Wenn wir aber weder Geld haben noch besonders anerkannt sind? Dann könnten wir in die Falle tappen zu denken wir seien nicht erfolgreich. Aber warte mal: Passt diese Art von „Erfolg“ denn überhaupt zu unseren eigenen Maßstäben?

Und was für eine Geschichte erzählen wir überhaupt von uns?

Nach den letzten beiden Wochen könnte ich erzählen, dass ich oft gescheitert bin und dass ich keinen Erfolg habe. Aber ehrlich, was würde denn so eine Geschichte bringen? Es wäre nicht nur eine deprimierende Geschichte, sie würde mir auch nichts nützen.

Wir haben ein Leben, also warum sollten wir nicht gute Geschichten davon erzählen! Also sage ich stattdessen: „Ich habe in letzter Zeit ziemlich viel gewagt. Gleichzeitig habe ich Erfahrungen mit Kritik – fairer und unfairer Kritik – und sogar Unfreundlichkeiten gesammelt. So oder so habe ich viel gelernt. Vor allem habe ich mich nicht daran hindern lassen, weiterhin große Träume zu haben. Ich erwarte tolle Gelegenheiten und Abenteuer, weil ich darauf vertraue, dass Gott einen guten Plan für mich hat.“

selfie with dog in flash light

Eine Freundin sagte mir neulich, dass ihre Kollegin sie ermahnt hat:  “In unserem Job müssen wir besonders flexibel sein.“ Es gibt so viele Vorstellungen davon, wie wir sein SOLLTEN. Aber vor allem als Kreative brauchen wir uns doch nicht mit den Grenzen gewöhnlicher Meinungen abfinden. Wenn wir zu unserer eigenen Freude arbeiten und nicht für das Urteil anderer, dann arbeiten wir mit dem Herz eines Künstlers. Und wir können viel und noch mehr erreichen, wenn wir nie aufhören zu glauben, unsere Geschichte vorteilhaft erzählen und Erfolg so definieren, dass es uns nicht entmutigt sondern stärkt.

Criticism: Five thoughts

shadow picture How to deal with criticism

Photograph your successes (and other thoughts about dealing with criticism)

Today I had to face harsh and personal criticism. And while I knew I shouldn`t “take it personally”, I didn`t know what that really means let alone how to do it. So, I`ve let this offence drain a lot of my energy – really, I felt like just having played Wimbledon (and lost) by the end of the day. Do you know that feeling? So, while I`m clearly not an expert in dealing with criticism, I`ve thought about some ideas about this, that might be helpful to share. Because when we get better at dealing with criticism not only will we preserve our energy, but we won`t dread offence so much and won`t let it hold us back from becoming braver as a professional and as a person.

It`s more about the criticizer

Anyway, back to the story: Lucky enough I had a coaching session scheduled tonight (www.ichinencoaching.com) so this was brilliant timing to discuss the issue. And I think I finally can make use of this “Don`t take it personally”: It often has nothing to do with us as a person, when being criticized, but in fact with the person who is criticizing. “Hurting people hurt people”, says Joyce Meyer. Equally one could say: People who feel attacked attack others. While talking about the situation I understood why the person who offended me did so. That doesn`t make the attack less mean but we are likely to not feel so angry about it knowing why the person offended us. So, I think it`s helpful to calmly analyze the situation that we have been criticized about to see why the other person has said what she has said.

Take notice of successful moments

Secondly, I can obviously recommend talking to somebody (but not ranting) who doesn’t judge. Who reminds us that if the criticism was justified we can work on ourselves. And that either way we have a lot of successes and achievements, too.

Talking about achievements: It`s helpful to really take notice of achievements as they happen. So that we can remember them in these kinds of situations. Only yesterday I`ve received best grade for my final work for my journalism degree and I hardly acknowledged it (not half as much as I took notice of this criticism today). So, I think taking a picture of these successful moments (big or small) or just writing a note in my planner might be a useful habit.

I wish I had said...

Another thing I struggled with, was to find the “right words” in the moment of attack. It was only afterwards that I came up with the phrases that I wished I had said. However, it helps to nevertheless say those phrases out loud afterwards – just for ourselves then. Because having practised, we will eventually find an appropriate peaceful response in a “real” situation, one that also honours what we think.

Oh, and not to forget: I think a good first aid after having been attacked is to be a good friend to ourselves. Which means that we don`t hurry on with the day but slow down a bit and maybe sip a coffee or tea, slip into soft clothes, say a little prayer and allow for a little downtime. Of course, it would be brilliant to be a superwoman with the perfect mindset who never gets upset but just moves on with her day. But hey, then again, taking things to heart also means that we have a heart, no?

Fotografiere deine Erfolge (und mehr zum Umgang mit Kritik)

Heute hat mich jemand ziemlich hart und persönlich kritisiert. Zwar wusste ich, dass ich das „nicht persönlich nehmen“ soll, aber mir war nicht klar, was das genau bedeutet und schon gar nicht wie das geht. Also habe ich mir von dieser Sache viel Energie rauben lassen – ehrlich, ich hab mich heute Abend gefühlt, als hätte ich Wimbledon gespielt (und verloren). Kennst du das Gefühl? Wie du siehst bin ich nicht gerade ein Experte darin, mit Angriffen umzugehen. Aber ich dachte, ich schreibe ein paar Ideen darüber auf, die uns in Zukunft helfen könnten. Denn wenn wir besser mit Kritik umgehen können, dann können wir nicht nur unsere Energie sparen, sondern wir fürchten uns nicht mehr so sehr davor, angegriffen zu werden und dadurch werden wir mutiger im Job und überhaupt als Mensch.

Es geht eher um den, der Kritik übt

Jedenfalls zurück zur Story: Glücklicherweise hatte ich heute Abend eine Coaching Stunde, das war also super Timing um die Sache zu besprechen. Und ich denke, ich kann jetzt mit diesem „Nimm`s nicht persönlich“ was anfangen: Es hat oft überhaupt nichts mit uns als Person zu tun, wenn uns jemand kritisiert, sondern mit der Person, die die Kritik äußert. „Verletze Menschen verletzen Menschen“, sagt Joyce Meyer. Genauso könnte man sagen: Leute, die sich angegriffen fühlen, greifen andere an. Als ich über die Situation, wegen der die Person mich angegriffen hat, gesprochen habe, habe ich verstanden, warum sie das gemacht hat. Das macht den Angriff nicht weniger gemein, aber wir sind doch nicht mehr so sauer, wenn wir verstehen, warum uns jemand angreift. Also ich denke, es ist hilfreich, die Situation ruhig zu untersuchen wegen der wir kritisiert wurden, um zu sehen, warum die andere Person uns angegriffen hat. 

Halte Erfolgsmomente fest

Außerdem kann ich natürlich sehr empfehlen, die Sache mit jemandem zu besprechen (ohne zu schimpfen oder zu lästern), der nicht urteilt. Der uns daran erinnert, dass wir an dem arbeiten können, für das wir zu Recht kritisiert worden sind. Und dass wir – so oder so – auch schon viele Erfolge hatten.

Apropos Erfolge: Mir ist mal wieder klar geworden, wie hilfreich es ist, wirklich Notiz von Erfolgsmomenten und Lob zu nehmen, um sich dann in schwierigen Situationen daran zu erinnern. Gerade gestern habe ich eine Eins für meine Abschlussarbeit für mein Journalismus-Studium bekommen und ich habe es gar nicht gebührend gefeiert. Tatsächlich habe ich dem nicht mal halb so viel Beachtung geschenkt, wie dieser Kritik heute. Also ich denke, es ist eine gute Gewohnheit von Erfolgsmomenten (auch den Kleineren) ein Foto zu machen oder zumindest eine Notiz im Terminkalender.

Ich wünschte, ich hätte ... gesagt.

Noch eine Sache, die ich schwierig fand, war die “richtigen Worte” zu finden als die Frau mir all ihre Anschuldigungen entgegenwarf. Erst später sind mir die Sätze eingefallen, die ich hätte sagen wollen. Allerdings ist es hilfreich, diese Sätze trotzdem – dann einfach danach und nur für mich selbst – zu sagen. Denn wenn wir das üben, finden wir irgendwann auch friedliche passende Antworten in der”echten” Situation, eine die auch das was wir selbst denken wertschätzt.

Oh, und nicht zu vergessen: Ich denke eine gute Erste Hilfe nach Kritik ist es, uns selbst ein guter Freund zu sein. Das heißt, dass wir nicht einfach weiterhetzen, sondern ein bisschen langsam machen, vielleicht einen Kaffee oder Tee schlürfen, in weiche Wohlfühlkleidung schlüpfen, ein kleines Gebet losschicken und uns eine Mini-Auszeit gönnen. Klar wäre es toll, Superwoman zu sein, die das perfekte Mindset hat und die sich nie angegriffen fühlt, sondern einfach mit ihrem Tag weitermacht. Aber hey, wenn wir uns Dinge zu Herzen nehmen, dann heißt das doch eigentlich vor allem, dass wir ein Herz haben, oder?

How to win time

mirror selfie How to win time

How to win time (with “positive procrastination”)

Do you sometimes feel like you don`t have time because you`ve got so much to do? Maybe you are (like me) a “last-minute-person” who tends to procrastinate. I`ve learned that this behaviour is a huge time robber.  

This week, I needed to hand in an important article. I had had six weeks to get it done, yet I started writing only four days before my deadline and handed it in right on the final day. Sounds familiar?

Instead of just getting something done when we originally plan to do it, we keep postponing it until it is not possible to postpone it any longer. The result is not only stress, but we also feel like the task is taking us much longer than it really does. I felt like my article has taken me six weeks, even though I effectively worked on it for four days.

Procrastinating work is spending time working

That`s because while postponing we still have the task on our mind. We aren`t really relaxed, but we think “Aww shit, I still need to do this sometime soon!” Spending time procrastinating something is like spending time working on it – just without achievement. In my case I “worked” on my article for six weeks, instead of the four days I`ve spent writing it.

If I had done it when I originally had planned it to do, it would have seemed like a simple four-day job, not a six weeks project. Plus, I would have felt like an “achiever”, thinking: “this could have taken me six weeks, but I managed in four days”. And I would have felt like being very time effective.

Writing the article wouldn`t have been much of a hassle – if I hadn`t made a hassle out of it by dragging it. Plus, I could have gotten a free confidence-boost and a good experience of accomplishment.

How to win time Mirror selfie

Commit to your schedule

While I kind of liked to be a last-minute-person at school or at university, I now find it very unhealthy for my nerves. We have more time to relax when we don`t spend it on procrastinating. Now I`m not saying to do everything straight away always – sometimes this isn`t even possible because we need to wait for missing information or simply a free space in our calendar (and we do need plenty of time for relaxing and enjoying after all). But the idea is to schedule tasks and to then do them at the time they are scheduled for – and not postpone them unless there`s a major reason to do so.

Time Manager Dave Crenshaw calls this “positive procrastination”. Instead of adding a task on our “To-Do-List” to do it “sometime soon”, we make an appointment for it in our calendar. And then, here`s the key: “Once it`s scheduled into your calendar, you have to commit to it.”

Doing so, we win time which we then can use to enjoying ourselves while being truly relaxed.  

Wie man Zeit gewinnt (mit “positivem Aufschieben”)

Hast du manchmal das Gefühl, zu hast keine Zeit, weil du zu viel zu tun hast? Vielleicht bist du (wie ich) ein “Auf-den-letzten-Drücker“-Typ, der Dinge gerne aufschiebt. Ich habe gelernt, dass das ein riesen Zeiträuber ist.

Diese Woche musste ich einen wichtigen Artikel einreichen. Ich hatte sechs Wochen Zeit zum Schreiben, aber ich habe erst vier Tage vor meiner Deadline begonnen. Am letzten möglichen Tag habe ich den Text eingereicht.

Anstatt Aufgaben einfach dann zu machen, wenn wir sie eingeplant haben, schieben wir sie auf die lange Bank, bis das irgendwann nicht mehr möglich ist. Das Ergebnis ist nicht nur Stress, sondern wir haben auch das Gefühl, viel länger an der Sache gearbeitet zu haben als das in Wirklichkeit der Fall ist. Mir ist es so vorgekommen, als hätte ich für meinen Artikel sechs Wochen gebraucht, dabei habe ich effektiv ja nur vier Tage lang daran gearbeitet.

Arbeit aufschieben heißt Zeit mit Arbeit zu verbringen

Das ist deshalb so, weil wir die Aufgabe beim Aufschieben ja immer noch in unserem Kopf haben. Wir sind nicht wirklich entspannt, sondern wir denken „Oh shit, ich muss das dringend bald machen.“ Zeit damit verbringen, eine Aufgabe aufzuschieben, fühlt sich an, als ob man gerade an ihr arbeiten würde – nur, dass man nichts dabei erreicht. In meinem Fall habe ich sechs Wochen an meinem Artikel „gearbeitet“, anstatt die vier Tage, die ich daran geschrieben habe.

Hätte ich ihn geschrieben, als ich es ursprünglich mal eingeplant habe, hätte es sich wie ein Job von vier Tagen angefühlt, nicht wie ein Sechs-Wochen-Projekt. Außerdem hätte ich mich wie ein “Erfolgstyp” gefühlt und gedacht: Das hätte sechs Wochen brauchen können, aber ich hab`s in vier Tagen hinbekommen. Und ich wäre mir sehr effizient vorgekommen.

Es wäre überhaupt keine große Sache gewesen, den Artikel zu schreiben – hätte ich keine große Sache daraus gemacht, in dem ich sie vor mir hergeschoben habe und sie dadurch immer größer geworden ist. Und ich hätte ganz umsonst einen Selbstvertrauens-Schub bekommen können, noch dazu eine gute Erfahrung.

how to win time - mirror selfie

Lege dich auf einen Zeitplan fest

Während der Schul- oder Uni-Zeit mochte ich es noch ganz gern, ein “Last-minute-Typ” zu sein, inzwischen finde ich es sehr ungesund für meine Nerven. Wir haben mehr Zeit, um entspannt zu sein, wenn wir sie nicht mit Aufschieberitis verbringen.

Ich sage jetzt nicht, dass wir immer alles gleich machen sollten – manchmal ist das ja auch gar nicht möglich, weil wir noch auf fehlende Infos warten müssen, oder auch einfach auf einen freien Platz in unserem Kalender. (Und wir brauchen schließlich viel Zeit zum Entspannen und Genießen).

Die Idee ist die: Wir planen Aufgaben ein und machen sie dann zu der Zeit, zu der sie eingeplant sind – und verschieben sie nicht, es sei denn es gibt einen wichtigen Grund.

Zeit-Manager Dave Crenshaw nennt das “Positive Aufschieberitis“. Anstatt eine Aufgabe auf unsere „To-Do-Liste“ zu schreiben, um sie „irgendwann bald mal“ zu machen, sollten wir für die Aufgabe einen Termin in unserem Kalender ausmachen. Und dann kommt das Wichtigste: „Sobald es in unserem Kalender eingeplant ist, müssen wir uns daran halten.“

Machen wir das, gewinnen wir Zeit, die wir dann – wirklich entspannt – mit Genießen verbringen können.

Read more about Freelance life in this post: Time and progress

Time and progress

time and progress fashion memories watch and wristlet

Time and Progress

Time is a tricky thing. It`s my birthday this weekend, reminding me of how fast time goes by. I feel like I cannot keep up at all. On the other hand, time brings some good stuff like progress, growth, and knowledge.

"If your goal is the time itself..."

However, I sometimes struggle to see my progress and I often don`t give myself credit for it. Or I become impatient. In this context I`m reminded about something that I’ ve heard in a conversation with street photographer Brandon Stanton (Humans of NY) on the podcast “Magic Lessons with Elisabeth Gilbert”.  He said that many goals depend on stuff we can`t control, for example, whether people like our work or not. “But if your goal is the time itself, just the time, then it becomes much simpler and more achievable. Because it depends on one thing: How you spend your time.”

Focus on the time

Success then isn`t the result, but the time spent with the work. Brandon Stanton suggests not to focus on a result like ‘I want to be a successful photojournalist’ or ‘I want to be a bestselling author’. We shouldn`t take a goal that is out of our control as a benchmark for success.

Instead, he advises to rather focus on the time we spend on the way. For example: “I spend one hour every morning to write”, or: “I take some time photographing every day.”

A gentle approach to success

As someone who struggles with competitive situations and who is easily intimidated by expectations or having to achieve things, I love this. It seems like a sustainable and somewhat gentle approach to success.

I still don`t know how to feel ok about aging. But I know what I can do meanwhile: valuing time I spend on things, rather than being anxious about the result. And have faith that there will be some good progress eventually and that God will take care of the outcome.

Zeit und Wachsen

Zeit ist eine schwierige Angelegenheit. Dieses Wochenende ist mein Geburtstag und erinnert mich daran, wie schnell die Zeit vergeht. Ich habe das Gefühl, dass ich überhaupt nicht mithalten kann. Andererseits bringt Zeit auch gute Sachen, wie Entwicklung, Wachstum und Wissen.

"Wenn dein Ziel die Zeit selbst ist..."

Allerdings fällt es mir oft schwer, meine Fortschritte zu sehen und anzuerkennen. Oder ich werde ungeduldig. In dem Zusammenhang fällt mir etwas ein, das ich in einem Gespräch mit Fotograf Brandon Stanton (Humans of NY) im Podcast “Magic Lessons with Elisabeth Gilbert” gehört habe.

Er sagt, dass viele Ziele von Dingen abhängig sind, die nicht in unserer Hand sind. Zum Beispiel ob Leute unsere Arbeit mögen oder nicht. „Aber wenn die Zeit selbst das Ziel ist, nur die Zeit, dann wird alles viel einfacher und machbarer. Denn der Erfolg hängt dann von einer Sache ab: Wie ich meine Zeit verbringe.“

Erfolgsfaktor Zeit

Erfolg ist dann nicht das Endergebnis, sondern Zeit mit der Arbeit selbst verbracht zu haben.

Brandon Stanton schlägt vor, sich nicht so sehr auf ein Endziel (wie ‚Ich will ein erfolgreicher Fotojournalist sein‘, oder: ‚Ich will einen Bestseller schreiben.‘) zu konzentrieren.

Statt Erfolg an einem Ziel messen, das wir nicht kontrollieren können, rät er, uns lieber auf die Zeit und den Weg dahin zu konzentrieren. Zum Beispiel ‚Ich will jeden morgen eine Stunde schreiben‘ , oder: ‚Ich nehme mir jeden Tag Zeit zum Fotografieren.‘

Eine nachhaltige Einstellung zum Erfolg

Als jemand, der Konkurrenzsituationen nicht mag und der sich leicht von Erwartungen und Erfolgsdenken einschüchtern lässt, mag ich diese Herangehensweise. Es scheint mir eine nachhaltige und irgendwie sanfte Einstellung zum Erfolg zu sein.

Ich weiß immer noch nicht, wie man mit dem Altern gut klarkommt. Aber ich weiß, was ich inzwischen tun kann: Die Zeit zu schätzen, die ich mit Dingen verbringen, anstatt mich mit Gedanken über das Ergebnis zu stressen. Und darauf vertrauen, dass ich Fortschritte mache und Gott den Rest schon für mich machen wird.

How to be creative

shadow on notebook How to be creative

How to be creative

Today, I really struggle with finding something interesting or potentially good to write. In fact, I often feel that way. However, my writing day is Friday, so something must be written – inspired or not. So, I`m taking the opportunity to write about commitment and inspiration.

The other day I`ve read a quote that basically nails it: “Forget inspiration. Habit is more dependable. Habit will sustain you whether you`re inspired or not.” (Octavia E.Butler in “Bloodchild and Other Stories”).

The mystery of the "cloud of inspiration"

That`s what`s happening to me today: I have developed kind of a habit for myself, to write something on a Friday. I have a regular “appointment” with myself. And because I feel it`s important for me, I am committed to keeping that appointment. Even when I don`t feel “inspired” or “creative” at the time.

Yet, I haven`t always been like that at all. And I still lack that quality in many areas of my life, where I should be more persistent and committed. I used to say: “Nerr, I`ll do that some other day when I feel more like it.” And I had that idea of some cloud of inspiration just coming over me now and then, without me being in much of control at all.

In your style How to be creative Nadine Wilmanns photography

Creativity requires fight

However, I have often seen, that this is not true at all: Why is it, that deadlines at Fashion Uni made me more “creative”? Well, I think, it`s because I was forced to actually sit down and do the work. Because there was a deadline, I didn’t have the option to wait for a cloud of inspiration to land on me. I had to get to work and fight – and make the inspiration come.

And it does come eventually. Sometimes sooner, sometimes it takes a while. “Creativity requires fight, action, habit, practice, work and never to give up”, writes photographer Chris Orwig in his great book  “The Creative Fight”.

At times, the outcome may not be brilliant. But having done my part is what counts. I have kept my appointment. If I keep on this way and keep on working it, instead of waiting for a creative spark, eventually, there will be something really good along the way.

Kreativ sein

Heute tue ich mir schwer, etwas zu finden, über das ich schreiben könnte. Tatsächlich geht es mir oft so. Allerdings ist Freitag mein Schreib-Tag – egal ob ich “inspiriert” bin oder nicht. Also nutze ich die Gelegenheit, etwas über Inspiration schreiben und darüber, sich auf etwas festzulegen.

Neulich habe ich ein Zitat gelesen, dass die Sache perfekt trifft: „Vergiss Inspiration. Gewohnheit ist verlässlicher. Gewohnheit wird dich tragen, egal ob du inspiriert bist oder nicht.“ (Octavia E.Butler in “Bloodchild and Other Stories”).

Die "Inspirations-Wolke"

Das passiert mir heute auch: Ich habe eine Art Gewohnheit für mich entwickelt, Freitags etwas zu schreiben. Ich habe einen regelmäßigen „Termin“ mit mir selber und weil ich den für mich wichtig finde, halte ich ihn ein. Auch wenn ich mich gerade nicht „inspiriert“ oder „kreativ“ fühle.

So war ich aber überhaupt nicht immer. Und in vielen Bereichen in meinem Leben halte ich mich immer noch nicht gut an meine eigenen Versprechen an mich. Typischerweise würde ich sagen: „Nee, ich mache das ein andermal, wenn mir mehr danach ist.“ Ich hatte die Idee einer Art „Inspirationswolke“, die sich einfach ab und zu auf einem absetzt, ohne dass man das großartig beeinflussen kann.

How to be creative Nadine Wilmanns photography

Kreativität erfordert Kampf

Allerdings habe ich oft gesehen, dass das nicht stimmt: Warum war ich zum Beispiel im Modestudium ausgerechnet kurz vor den Deadlines „kreativer“ als sonst? Ich denke, es lag daran, dass ich gezwungen war, mich tatsächlich hinzusetzen und die Aufgaben konzentriert anzugehen. Wegen der Deadline hatte ich gar nicht die Option, auf eine Inspirationswolke zu warten. Ich musste mich an die Arbeit machen, kämpfen – und der Inspiration hinterherrennen.

Und man kriegt sie dann auch irgendwann, manchmal früher, manchmal später. „Kreativität erfordert Kampf, Tun, Gewohnheit, Übung und nie aufzugeben”, schreibt Fotograf Chris Orwig in seinem Buch “The Creative Fight” .

Es kommt vor, dass das Ergebnis nicht großartig ist. Aber meinen Teil, das was ich konnte, abgeliefert zu haben, ist das was zählt.  Ich habe meinen Termin eingehalten. Wenn ich auf diesem Weg bleibe und weiter daran arbeite, anstatt auf einen kreativen Geistesblitz zu warten, dann wird  irgendwann auch mal etwas richtig Gutes dabei rauskommen.  

Read more:

Self-Assignment