Christof Sage

magazine press interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

"There`s no such thing as can`t."

In Conversation with Christof Sage

If I was to name all the celebrities that Christof Sage (www.sage-press.de) has photographed it would probably take hours. Bill Clinton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Morgan Freeman, …. even Pope and Queen. And of course all the celebs in his home country Germany – Angela Merkel Thomas Gottschalk, Boris Becker,… Attached to the shoulder straps of his cameras are hundreds of admission wristbands of all the big events that he`s been to as a press photographer. For years Christof Sage was traveling for magazines in order to photograph the most famous people in this world. Now, he has published his own glossy magazine – “Sage”. We met up in his home in Stuttgart-Filderstadt.

Christof, there are so many wanting to be high-profile photographers. Yet, only few make it. Why did you make it to the top?

That has to grow. You start in your twenties by getting into events. After time, people see you more and more often, if you present yourself well in terms of looks and attitude. But that takes years. In the Seventies, I attended the most important events. Then you get booked. In the Eighties, I photographed international celebrities at the set of the famous TV-Show “Wetten, dass…”. I started from the bottom. Things didn`t come easy, I wasn`t left with an inheritance or anything, I have worked very hard and with great diligence to achieve this.

Would you have thought, when you were twenty years old, that you would be photographing people like Bill Clinton one day?

No, I only knew that I wanted to have a house and a Porsche when I`m 60. I advise young people: You need to have a goal in mind. Where do you want to be when you`re 60? You need to divide and plan your life – what do you do between the ages of 20 and 30, 30 and 40? Before starting an apprenticeship, ask yourself: Do you have fun doing what you do? It`s not about money, you need to have love. I really do enjoy working with people. I have been working in a hundred different countries. That`s not that easy to achieve as a photographer. It worked out because I have worked twice as much as others, 17 hours each day. It requires great diligence – but that all comes back to you.

“It`s not about money, you need to have love.”

 

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

Why did you choose people-photography as your thing? I mean you could have as well become, say, for example, a landscape photographer, couldn`t you?

I love humans. The press likes to call me a celebrity photographer, but in fact, I`m a communication photographer, a people photographer – I photograph people. And communication is very important for my job: You have to do a warm-up with people. You can`t just place yourself in front of people`s faces – “Here we go!” But you need to make people loosen up. Only once you managed to do that, you can start taking photos. You should see me photographing abroad: I often don`t understand the language, but I joke, and they understand me at once.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
Press interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

You take pictures of people who don`t necessarily look like models, who need to look as good as possible on photos though – after all, they`re in the public eye. Are you retouching a lot?

I don`t have time for retouching. I`ve got jobs that are demanding 400 portraits in one day – from morning to late in the evening. You`ve got 30 to 60 seconds for each person, you can exchange a few words only. I give directions, make chit-chat, say „Stand like this or like that” – then, boom – photo. That`s a different way of photographing than it`s commonly known. That is fun, but only very few photographers have that skill. That`s what I`m getting booked for. People know: When Sage is in the house, everything runs like clockwork.

Sounds great – but as well like a lot of pressure…

Well, I need to be quick. The camera is pre-set – I don`t have time to configure settings when I`m shooting. The camera has to run in burst mode. The photographer Helmut Newton once asked me at an event: “Why do you use flash? You don`t need to – look, I photograph using only ambient light.” But he was no contract photographer. He was there for fun, not to deliver contract work. My work is about being fast. When I`m at a horse race I have to photograph 200 couples, approach everyone, observe who belongs to whom, when is which person at which table. Then you need to act fast, everything has to be done chop chop. That`s a completely different way of working. I do enjoy photographing these kinds of events – I`m in full action and completely in my element.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

Do you have a career highlight, maybe a photograph, that you love the most?

I don`t have that. Every photo is important to me. I have attended great events and am very grateful for that. If I set myself a goal I make it happen. There`s no such thing as can`t. Sometimes it needs three or four attempts. It has taken me years to get to know the right people to get accreditation for events like the Golden Globes. But that`s what makes it exciting. If you really want to achieve something, then you will succeed. But you won`t if you just try half-heartedly – then you`ll never make it. One has to be born to work independently, it`s not everybody’s cup of tea.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

“If you really want to achieve something, then you will succeed. But you won`t if you just try half-heartedly – then you`ll never make it.”

Your career started with film photography. How did you perceive the switch to digital?

Digital cameras have changed my work for the better. First, we refused to make the change, but only half a year in we bought the first digital camera for about 16000 Euro. You can now take better pictures with a smartphone than with that camera. When on delegation trips with the former chancellor Helmut Kohl and fellow politician Erwin Teufel the German press agency dpa wanted photos of every day. I had to transport camera films accompanied by escort vehicles. And while doing that I was missing on site. With digital everything was so much quicker and less complicated.

That`s quite a sign of trust that people like the former chancellor would take you on their state visits...

It`s been written about me: „Discretion is his life insurance“. When traveling with famous people you hear and see a lot of confidential things. Until this day I have been keeping my word of honor. Whatever private matters I would see or hear, I would never make them public. Only few are able to keep that word – there are people selling secrets and photos that aren`t meant for the public eye for 50 Euro.

And now there`s another milestone in your career: You`ve just published your very own magazine “Sage”!

You need to come up with new things all the time. Ask yourself: Where are my strengths? And then work on them further. Have new ideas. Where can I place my work on the market? Because of COVID, all events are being canceled for more than a year now, everything takes place online, so press photographers have nothing to photograph. Therefore I thought: If I can`t photograph, I have other people photograph for me and publish my own magazine “Sage”. Just lounging around or tidying my office all day isn`t for me. The magazine is a success – almost all copies have sold and I have to print more now.

magazine press interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

"Geht nicht gibt`s nicht."

Im Gespräch mit Christof Sage

Wollte ich alle Stars und Sternchen aufzählen, die Christof Sage (www.sage-press.de) schon fotografiert hat, säße ich vermutlich noch in zwei Stunden an dieser Aufzählung. Bill Clinton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Morgan Freeman, …- sogar Papst und Queen. Und natürlich sämtliche Bekanntheiten aus Deutschland – Angela Merkel, Thomas Gottschalk, Boris Becker, und und und. An den Schultergurten seiner Kameras hängen hunderte von Eintrittsbändchen von all den großen Veranstaltungen, die er als Pressefotograf besucht hat. Jahrelang war er für Magazine unterwegs, um die berühmtesten Menschen dieser Welt abzulichten. Jetzt hat er sein eigenes Hochglanzmagazin herausgebracht – „Sage“. Wir haben uns in seinem Zuhause in Filderstadt getroffen.

Mensch, Christof, es gibt so viele, die Top-Fotograf werden möchten. Nur die Allerwenigsten schaffen es – warum hast du`s geschafft?

Sowas muss wachsen. Du fängst mit zwanzigmal an, in Veranstaltungen reinzukommen. Irgendwann sehen dich die Leute immer öfter, wenn du dich optisch und menschlich gut verkaufst. Das dauert aber Jahre. In den 70er Jahren war ich bei den wichtigsten Events dabei. Dann wirst du gebucht. In den 80er Jahren habe ich bei der Fernsehshow „Wetten, dass…“ Weltstars fotografiert. Ich habe bei null angefangen. Mir wurde nichts geschenkt, ich habe nichts geerbt, habe mir alles selbst hart erarbeitet – mit sehr viel Fleiß.

Hättest du mit zwanzig gedacht, dass du mal Leute wie Bill Clinton fotografierst?

Nein, ich wusste nur, dass ich mit sechzig ein Haus und einen Porsche möchte. Ich rate jungen Menschen immer: Ihr braucht ein Ziel vor Augen: Wo wollt ihr mit 60 sein? Ihr müsst euch das Leben einteilen – was macht ihr von 20 bis 30, von 30 bis 40? Bevor ihr eine Ausbildung beginnt, überlegt euch: Habe ich eigentlich Spaß an dem was ich mache? Es geht nicht ums Geld, du brauchst Liebe dafür. Mir macht es Freude, mit Menschen zu arbeiten. Ich habe in hundert Ländern auf der Erde gearbeitet. Das musst du als Fotograf erstmal schaffen. Das hat funktioniert, weil ich doppelt so viel gearbeitet habe, als die anderen, jeden Tag 17 Stunden. Du musst sehr viel Fleiß aufbringen – aber das kommt dann alles zurück.

“Es geht nicht um`s Geld. Du brauchst Liebe dafür.”

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

Warum hast du dir People-Fotografie als Spezialität ausgesucht? Du hättest ja auch sagen wir mal Landschaftsfotografie machen können?

Ich liebe die Menschen. Die Presse betitelt mich gerne als Promi- oder Star-Fotograf, aber eigentlich bin ich Kommunikationsfotograf, People-Fotograf – ich fotografiere Menschen. Und Kommunikation ist dabei wichtig: Du muss mit den Leuten erstmal ein Warm-up machen. Du kannst dich nicht einfach hinstellen – „so jetzt geht`s los“. Sondern, du musst die Leute auflockern. Erst wenn du das geschafft hast, kann`s losgehen. Du solltest mich mal sehen, wenn ich im Ausland fotografiere: Ich verstehe die Sprache oft nicht, mache einen Witz daraus und die anderen verstehen mich sofort.

Du fotografierst ja Menschen, die nicht unbedingt wie Models aussehen, aber auf Fotos möglichst gut aussehen müssen – schließlich stehen sie in der Öffentlichkeit. Bist du da viel am Retuschieren?

Zeit für Retuschieren habe ich nicht. Ich habe Aufträge, da mache ich 400 Portraits an einem Tag – von morgens bis abends. Da hast du für jeden 30 bis 60 Sekunden, zwei Sätze. Ich führe Regie, halte kurz Small-Talk, sage schon mal „Steh so oder so“ – dann, zack – Foto. Das ist eine andere Art zu fotografieren, als man es für gewöhnlich kennt. Das macht Spaß, aber das können wirklich nur wenige Fotografen. Dafür werde ich gebucht – die Leute wissen: wenn Sage da ist, läuft`s.

Klingt super – aber ja, auch nach Druck...

Bei mir muss es schnell gehen. Die Kamera ist voreingestellt – ich habe keine Zeit, noch Sachen einzustellen. Der Motor muss laufen. Der Fotograf Helmut Newton fragte mich mal auf einer Veranstaltung: „Warum verwendest du Blitz? Das brauchst du doch nicht – schau, ich fotografiere mit dem Licht, das da ist“. Aber er ist kein Auftragsfotograf. Er war da zum Vergnügen, nicht um Auftragsarbeit abzuliefern. Bei mir geht es um Schnelligkeit. Bei einem Pferderennen muss ich 200 Paare durchfotografieren, muss auf jeden zugehen, muss beobachten, wer gehört zu wem, wann ist wer an welchem Tisch. Da musst du schnell handeln, alles muss zack-zack gehen, das ist eine ganz andere Arbeit. Ich muss volle Leistung bringen. Und nach zwei Stunden ist es vorbei. Solche Events machen mir Spaß – da bin ich in Action, ganz in meinem Element.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
press interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

Hast du ein Karriere-Highlight, ein Foto, über das du dich besonders freust?

Sowas habe ich nicht. Für mich ist jedes Foto wichtig. Ich habe tolle Veranstaltungen mitgemacht und bin dafür sehr dankbar. Wenn ich mir Ziele setzte, verwirkliche ich sie. Geht nicht gibt`s nicht.  Manchmal braucht es drei oder vier Anläufe. Es hat Jahre gedauert, um die richtigen Leute kennenzulernen, um Akkreditierungen für Veranstaltungen wie die Golden Globes zu bekommen. Aber darin liegt der Reiz. Wenn man etwas wirklich erreichen will, dann erreicht man es auch. Aber nicht, wenn man etwas halbherzig macht – dann schafft man`s nie. Für das selbständige Arbeiten muss man geboren sein, das liegt nicht jedem.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

“Wenn man etwas wirklich erreichen will, dann erreicht man es auch. Aber nicht, wenn man etwas halbherzig macht – dann schafft man`s nie.”

Du hast deine Karriere ja noch mit Film begonnen. Wie hast du den Wechsel zur Digitalfotografie erlebt?

Digitalkameras haben meine Arbeit zum Positiven verändert. Erst wollten wir den Wechsel nicht mitmachen, aber schon nach einem halben Jahr haben wir unsere erste digitale Kamera für 16 000 Euro gekauft. Da machst du heute mit dem Handy bessere Bilder, als damit. Bei den Delegationsreisen mit Helmut Kohl und Erwin Teufel wollte die dpa jeden Tag Fotos. Ich musste oft Filme mit Eskorte-Fahrzeugen transportieren – und habe in der Zeit dann vor Ort gefehlt. Digital geht alles viel schneller und unkomplizierter.  

Das ist ein ganz schön großer Vertrauensbeweis, wenn dich Leute wie der ehemalige Bundeskanzler zu Reisen mitnehmen...

Über mich wurde geschrieben: „Diskretion ist seine Lebensversicherung“. Wenn du mit bekannten Menschen unterwegs bist, hörst und siehst du viel Vertrauliches. Bis zum heutigen Tag gilt mein Ehrenwort. Egal welche vertraulichen Sachen ich höre oder sehe, ich würde damit nie an die Öffentlichkeit gehen. Das können die Wenigsten – es gibt ja Leute, die für 50 Euro Geheimnisse verraten oder Bilder verkaufen, die nicht für die Öffentlichkeit bestimmt sind.

Und jetzt gibt`s einen neuen Meilenstein in deiner Karriere: du hast dein eigenes Magazin „Sage“ herausgebracht!

Du musst dir immer neue Sachen einfallen lassen. Dich immer fragen: wo liegen meine Stärken? Und die ausarbeiten. Neue Ideen haben. Wo kann ich meine Art von Arbeit an den Mann bringen? Bei uns Presse-Fotografen sind wegen Corona seit einem Jahr alle Events abgesagt, alles nur noch online, nichts mehr zu fotografieren. Daher habe ich mir gedacht: wenn ich nicht fotografieren kann, lasse ich fotografieren und gebe mein eigenes Magazin „Sage“ heraus. Die ganze Zeit herumliegen und Büro aufräumen, das ist nichts für mich. Das Magazin ist ein Erfolg – fast alle Exemplare sind verkauft und ich muss bereits nachdrucken.

Magazine press interview

Daniela Reske

photographer Daniela Reske

„You mustn`t be a perfectionist when doing documentaries“

„You mustn`t be a perfectionist when doing documentary“

photographer Daniela Reske

In Conversation with Daniela Reske

Finally, I start what I`ve had in my mind for a while now: Every now and then I want to interview creatives whose work I find inspiring – photographers, fashion designers and other artists. We can learn so much from each other! Generally, I want to get into the habit of asking questions and most importantly of truly listening. My first interview for this blog is with one of my very favourite photographers, Daniela Reske. She has her studio in Reutlingen-Oferdingen/Germany, and documents weddings internationally. Her pictures are like cinema – one-of-a-kind storyworlds filled with feeling and special moments. We met in her studio, a former boathouse by a river with huge old windows and a cozy fireplace.

Daniela, when I look at your work, I feel like in a movie that I want to keep on watching. How did you get to your unique visual language?

I have always been intrigued by journalism, by pictures that are conveying the moment. When I started out as a photographer twelve years ago, the reportage approach in weddings wasn`t mainstream yet. It was offered by only a few photographers. In the US this approach of documenting the entire day had been common for some time though. Today, wedding documentaries are pretty much standard. I loved the idea of having a photo album that enables people to relive that special day. When are friends and family ever all together? To me it`s important to show what`s happening in a genuine way, to truly document.

How do you put that into practice?

I use a 35 mm prime lens. That makes my pictures look very cinematic. Instead of the typical portrait, I rather capture scenes. I have looked at photographs that I liked and analyzed them: How are things done technically? What do I need to master as a photographer? How do I need to act in order to enable these scenes and moments to unfold in front of me? I must not attract attention. Which challenges the use of a 35 mm lens. So, I have to be even more unobtrusive. This technique is a big part of my work. I don`t use zoom lenses, but I walk instead. And I know how I need to move.

“To me it`s important to show what`s happening in a genuine way, to truly document.”

photographer Daniela Reske

Don`t you find that oftentimes people are immediately alarmed when they feel a camera pointed at them, either looking straight into the camera or turning away?

Often you can catch a funny moment when a person looks straight into the camera in just that moment when you want to press the shutter. When there`s a lot of interaction it`s easier for me. The more hustle and bustle the better. But I generally act very unobtrusive and am hardly noticed. However, at weddings, people are dressed up and want to be photographed. Because of its defined context, a wedding is an opportunity for many good photos – it certainly is different from going into town to take pictures.

What makes a good picture for you?

If it tells a story and if it`s touching – moving in any way and be it in a negative way. Of course, I`m pleased if the composition and light are right, too. But not the perfect picture is the good one. A trivial subject matter that`s captured with perfection often contains no emotion. A good picture is the one that conveys feeling and communicates the moment.

So you can overlook flaws, for example when something is out of focus what really should be in focus?

If a potentially good picture is so blurred that I can`t use it, that of course annoys me. As I work a lot with my aperture wide open, it happens often, that something isn`t quite perfectly in focus. I can handle that. I think of the movies, where the focus is moved to the ear for the skin to look smoother. You must not be a perfectionist when doing documentaries, otherwise, you`ll end up unhappy. A picture has to communicate a strong story and strike a chord with the viewer. Everything else is a minor matter. That`s what I like about reportage.

photographer Daniela Reske
Photographer Daniela Reske

Do you sometimes have nightmares about missing important moments at a photo event?

The evidently important moments, like the kiss after the wedding ceremony, are certainly must-haves. When it comes to these moments, I take no risks, but I don`t expect any artistic masterpieces either. The truly brilliant pictures are captured in other situations. You cannot be everywhere at the same time, you can`t get everything, because so much is happening simultaneously. I am alert and focused and I pay close attention to what`s going on around me. At a wedding, I`m with the couple already in the morning, when they prepare for the day. I then notice which people are most important to them, who have a special relationship with them. Those, I want to capture often. I don`t search for moments, but I keep my eyes and my mind wide open.

During conventional photo shoots, narrative moments don`t necessarily happen just like that. Nevertheless, you manage to maintain your expressive imagery…

Generally, I try to keep photoshoots as natural as possible. I don`t have a plan of how the people are supposed to look in the photos. I always try to find out, what they are here for, and what attracted them to my images. In my photos, I try to reveal relationships. I don`t dictate poses. I set the context in order to allow the happenings to unfold freely. It`s very important that I show up easy-going, confident, and relaxed. So that the people in front of the camera can let go. If I`m insecure the shooting is not going to succeed. Confidence comes with practice though.

After twelve years working as a photographer you probably have a lot of that – say, how did you get into photography at all?

At school, we built a Camera Obscura, a pinhole camera. I was completely in awe. I have always been a visual person. When I had my daughter, I started to photograph her. A friend asked me to photograph her wedding. That`s how I got to my first portfolio images. Before I had been working in marketing and I was very media-savvy. That helped me to become visible and prominent as a self-employed creative.

Photographer Daniela Reske

“In my photos, I try to reveal relationships.”

What have your biggest challenges as a photographer been?

I find it difficult when people have a fixed image of how they want to come across. This is especially common in the business sector. I then feel like I have to put them in a costume, which I can`t. A challenge for every photographer is peoples` harsh self-criticism. Sometimes, while I`m photographing someone, that person points out that certain flaws can be retouched later. That`s when I start to communicate that I`m not here to make them slimmer. Of course, I picture everyone in an appealing, aesthetically pleasing way. If people aren`t at peace with themselves, I can`t do anything about that as a photographer though. I see the opposite, too: Last year, I had beautiful shootings with women, who told me that they wanted to be photographed because they feel they`re now at peace with themselves.

You were the co-author of a book and you initiated workshops – are there any new projects on the horizon?

When the situation allows it, I will certainly offer workshops again. Together with a friend and colleague, I have opened an online shop where we sell prints. And I`m sure we`ll do some exhibitions again.

„Du darfst bei Reportagen nicht perfektionistisch sein“

„Du darfst bei Reportagen nicht perfektionistisch sein“

photographer Daniela Reske

Im Gespräch mit Daniela Reske

Endlich beginne ich, was ich schon lange vorhatte: Eine lose Interviewserie mit Kreativen, deren Arbeit ich beeindruckend finde – Fotografen, Modedesigner und andere Künstler. Es gibt so viel zu lernen! Generell möchte ich mir angewöhnen, viele Fragen zu stellen und vor allem gut zuzuhören. Mein erstes Interview ist mit einer meiner Lieblingsfotografinnen: Daniela Reske. Sie hat ihr Atelier in Reutlingen-Oferdingen, reist aber auch schon mal ins Ausland, um Hochzeiten zu dokumentieren. Ihre Bilder sind wie Kino – einzigartige Erzählwelten, voller Gefühl und besonderer Augenblicke. Wir haben uns in ihrem Atelier getroffen, einem ehemaligen Bootshaus am Fluss mit riesigen alten Fenstern und gemütlichem Kaminfeuer.

Daniela, wenn ich mir deine Arbeiten anschaue, komme ich mir vor wie in einem Film, den man immer weiter schauen möchte. Wie bist du zu deiner besonderen Bildsprache gekommen?

Mich hat schon immer das Journalistische interessiert – Bilder, die im Moment passieren. Als ich vor zwölf Jahren als Fotografin begonnen habe, war die Hochzeitsreportage noch nicht so etabliert. Es gab nur eine Handvoll Fotografen, die das gemacht haben. In den USA gab es die Bewegung schon länger, dass der ganze Tag begleitet und dokumentiert wird. Heute ist die Reportage im Hochzeitsbereich ja fast Standard. Ich fand die Idee schön, dass das es am Ende ein Album gibt, mit dem man diesen besonderen Tag nacherleben kann. Wann sind Freunde und Familie schon mal alle zusammen? Wichtig ist mir, das Geschehen so festzuhalten, wie es tatsächlich passiert ist – also wirkliche Reportage-Arbeit.

Wie setzt du das praktisch um?

Ich fotografiere mit 35 mm Festbrennweite. Dadurch wirken die Bilder sehr filmisch. Statt klassischen Portraits, fange ich eher Szenen ein. Ich habe mir Sachen angeschaut, die mir gefallen haben und habe mir dann überlegt: Wie ist das technisch gelöst? Was muss ich als Fotografin können? Wie muss ich mich verhalten, damit diese Szenen und Momente vor mir geschehen können? Ich muss unauffällig sein. Das steht eigentlich im Widerspruch zu den 35 mm, also erfordert es noch mehr Zurückhaltung von mir. Die Technik ist ein großer Teil meiner Arbeit. Ich zoome nicht, sondern laufe. Und ich weiß, wie ich mich bewegen muss.

“Wichtig ist mir, das Geschehen so festzuhalten, wie es tatsächlich passiert ist – also wirkliche Reportage-Arbeit.”

photographer Daniela Reske

Geht es dir nicht oft so, dass Leute sofort verschreckt her – oder weg – schauen, sobald eine Kamera auf sie gerichtet wird?

Oft erwischt man einen witzigen Moment, wenn eine Person gerade in die Kamera schaut. Wenn viel Miteinander stattfindet, ist es einfacher für mich. Je trubeliger, desto besser. Aber ich verhalte mich eben sehr zurückhaltend und werde dann fast nicht mehr wahrgenommen. Auf Hochzeiten ist es außerdem so, dass sich alle schön zurechtgemacht haben. Die Leute wollen dann auch fotografiert werden. Durch den definierten Rahmen ermöglicht eine Hochzeit immer viele gute Bilder – anders als würde man einfach in die Stadt gehen und fotografieren.

Was macht für dich ein gutes Bild aus?

Wenn es eine Geschichte erzählt und berührt – auf irgendeine Art und Weise, das kann auch negativ sein. Natürlich freut es mich, wenn dazu noch Komposition und Licht stimmen. Aber nicht das perfekte Bild ist das Gute, sondern das emotionale Bild, das den Moment rüberbringt. Ein gewöhnliches Motiv, bei dem alles perfektioniert ist, hat dagegen oft keine Emotion.

Dann kannst du also gut darüber hinwegsehen, wenn zum Beispiel mal was nicht ganz scharf ist, was eigentlich im Fokus sein sollte?

Wenn ein potentiell gutes Bild unbrauchbar unscharf ist, ärgert es mich natürlich. Ich arbeite viel offenblendig, da passiert es schnell, dass der Fokus nicht perfekt ist. Damit kann ich gut umgehen. Ich denke da an den Film, bei dem absichtlich der Fokus aufs Ohr gelegt wird, damit die Haut schöner wirkt. Du darfst bei Reportagen nicht perfektionistisch sein, sonst wirst du unglücklich. Ein Bild soll starke Geschichten erzählen und emotional berühren, das andere ist Nebensache. Gerade das mag ich an der Reportage.

photographer Daniela Reske

Hast du manchmal Alpträume, wichtige Momente eines Fotoevents zu verpassen?

Die vordergründig wichtigen Momente, wie der Kuss nach der Trauung, sind natürlich Must-Haves. Da gehe ich einfach auf Sicherheit und erwarte keine großen Kunstwerke. Die wirklich guten Bilder mache ich an anderen Stellen. Du kannst nicht immer überall sein, kannst nicht alles erwischen, denn es geschieht ja so viel gleichzeitig. Ich bin aufmerksam und fokussiert und achte darauf, was um mich herum passiert. Weil ich schon morgens bei den Vorbereitungen dabei bin, bekomme ich mit, wer die wichtigen Menschen im Umfeld des Paares sind, wer einen besonderen Bezug hat. Da schaue ich, dass die oft festgehalten sind. Ich suche die Momente nicht, sondern ich halte Augen und Geist offen.

Bei klassischen Fotoshootings kommen erzählende Momente nicht unbedingt von selbst. Trotzdem schaffst du es auch da, deine ausdrucksstarke Bildsprache beizubehalten...

Auch Fotoshootings versuche ich so natürlich wie möglich zu halten. Ich habe keinen Plan im Kopf, wie die Menschen auf den Bildern aussehen sollen. Ich versuche immer herauszufinden, warum sie hier sind, was sie an meinen Fotos angezogen hat. Auf den Bildern versuche ich, Beziehungen zu zeigen und gebe keine Posen vor. Ich konstruiere den Rahmen, um dann möglichst viel dem Geschehen selbst zu überlassen. Wichtig ist, dass ich als Fotografin Coolness, Selbstverständlichkeit und Entspanntheit mitbringe, damit die Menschen vor der Kamera loslassen können. Wenn ich unsicher bin, wird das Shooting nichts. Sicherheit kommt aber mit Übung.

Davon hast du nach zwölf Jahren als Fotografin bestimmt viel - sag mal, wie bist du eigentlich überhaupt zur Fotografie gekommen?

In der Schule haben wir eine Kamera Obscura gebaut, das hat mich total begeistert. Ich war immer ein visueller Mensch. Als meine Tochter da war, habe ich angefangen, sie zu fotografieren. Eine Freundin hat mich gefragt, ob ich ihre Hochzeit fotografiere und so hatte ich meine ersten Bilder. Vorher habe ich im Marketing gearbeitet und ich war sehr medienaffin. Das hat mir als selbständige Kreative geholfen, sichtbar zu werden.

photographer Daniela Reske

“Auf meinen Bildern versuche ich, Beziehungen zu zeigen.”

Was waren oder sind deine größten Herausforderungen als Fotografin?

Schwierig wird es, wenn Menschen eine zu konkrete Vorstellung davon haben, wie sie wirken möchten. Das kommt vor allem im Business-Bereich vor. Ich habe dann das Gefühl, ich muss ihnen ein Kostüm anziehen, was ich ja gar nicht kann. Eine Herausforderung für jeden Fotografen ist, dass Menschen oft sehr selbstkritisch sind. Manche weisen schon während des Shootings darauf hin, dass man ja retuschieren könne. Da fange ich bereits an, zu vermitteln, dass ich als Fotograf nicht dazu da bin, sie schlanker zu machen. Natürlich fotografiere ich jeden schön und ästhetisch ansprechend. Wenn Menschen mit sich selbst nicht im Reinen sind, dann kann ich da als Fotograf nichts machen. Ich erlebe auch das Gegenteil: Letztes Jahr hatte ich sehr schöne Shootings mit Frauen, die sagten, sie wollen intimere Fotos von sich, weil sie jetzt mit sich im Reinen sind.

Du hast ja bereits an einem Buch mitgeschrieben, hast Workshops initiiert – gibt`s gerade neue Projekte bei dir?

Wenn es die Situation zulässt, werde ich in Zukunft sicher wieder Workshops anbieten. Mit einem Freund und Kollegen habe ich letztes Jahr einen Onlineshop eröffnet, über den wir Prints verkaufen. Und wir werden bestimmt auch wieder Ausstellungen machen.

photographer Daniela Reske
photographer Daniela Reske