Business and Emotion

How emotional storytelling helps your business

If the dog in front of the butchers on Broadway Market in London had money it would probably spend it all in there. And it would become a repeat customer quickly. Because the idea of meat makes triggers happy emotions in the dog’s mind.

Did you know that clients who feel emotionally connected with a brand spend on average twice as much annually with that brand as highly satisfied customers! The article “The New Science of Customer Emotions” in the Harvard Business Review states exactly that. This doesn`t just apply to brands but to businesses in general: small stores, big companies, creative artists – anybody who has customers. And I can absolutely relate to that.

Emotional Triggers

Say, I wanted to buy fruit. Of course, I wanted the basics to be according to my wishes: I need to find it tasty, it should be fresh and preferably organic, and I want it to look good and appetizing.  But there are hundreds of stores in London and dozens in my area, that sell exactly that. So, to which shop do I go?

This all comes down to emotional connection. According to the article and my experience as a consumer, this is an even more substantial factor than price or satisfaction with a product or service. Why else would people buy from high-end brands like Chanel or Jaguar?  “You pay for the name”, people say – and this is because the brand identity triggers an emotion within us that we like (…or don`t like and in that case, we don`t enjoy buying from that business so much and will run to its competitor at the next best opportunity).

According to the article, some of the most common emotional triggers are: feeling special, feeling confident and hopeful, a sense of well-being, a sense of thrill, feeling free, a sense of belonging, feeling like doing something good for the environment, feeling secure, and the idea of succeeding.

More than satisfaction

If the story of a store, a company, an artist, or a brand triggers one or more of these feelings in a person, this person is likely to become a fan. These stories are usually told most effectively in visuals because images can trigger emotions in us within seconds. If we can relate, we want to support this brand and we feel good about spending money with this business. And as a result, we spend on average twice as much with this business as someone who just has his or her basic needs satisfied (like design, quality, functionality, or comfort).

On a side note: This also illustrates why we cannot please everyone, because people’s emotions get triggered by different kinds of visuals – not everyone has the same hopes, not everyone likes a thrill, or not everyone cares for the environment. And the best stories we can tell are those that are authentic and true to ourselves.

Customers become fans

Back to this kind of “mechanism” in the fruit example: If I see the images of a food store, they may give me a sense of home (belonging), well-being, or hope for fitness and health. Then I will feel emotionally connected with that store. And if they happen to sell the fruit I like, that will be the place for me to go and buy some. And I`ll probably buy it there next week, too. I will recommend that store to my friends in the neighbourhood. Because I`ve become a fan and want this business to succeed and am happy to be part of that success. So that I can relive the story and the triggered emotions again and again when doing my shopping in that store and when I have its products in my home.

For us creative businesses and freelancers this means that we don`t carelessly post bad images of our products but that we make sure that our visuals transport an emotion. Of course, it would be helpful to focus on a handful of similar emotions so that our message can be understood – and felt – clearly.

PS. Pictured are the Hill & Szrok Butcher`s on Broadway Market/London. Also the Village Organic near Victoria Park/London, and peaches at L’eau à la bouche, also on Broadway Market.

Wie emotionales Storytelling deinem Business hilft

Wenn der Hund vor dieser Metzgerei in London Geld hätte, würde er es vermutlich alles in diesem Laden ausgeben – und er würde schnell Stammkunde werden. Weil die Vorstellung von Fleisch Glücksgefühle in ihm auslöst.

Wusstest du, dass Kunden, die sich emotional mit einer Marke verbunden fühlen, durchschnittlich doppelt so viel Geld bei dieser Marke ausgeben als Kunden, die einfach „nur“ hochzufrieden sind! Genau das sagt der Artikel  “The New Science of Customer Emotions” im Harvard Business Review. Das trifft nicht nur auf Marken zu, sondern auf Businesses überhaupt – kleine Läden, große Firmen, kreative Künstler, jeder, der Kunden hat. Ich kann das aus eigener Erfahrung nur bestätigen.

Gefühlsauslöser

Sagen wir mal, ich wollte Obst kaufen. Natürlich müssen die Basics stimmen: Ich muss das Obst mögen, es sollte frisch und am besten bio sein, außerdem sollte es gut und appetitlich aussehen. Aber in London gibt es hunderte Läden und Duzende in meiner Gegend, die genau das verkaufen. Also in welchen Laden gehe ich?

Das ist eine Frage der emotionalen Verbindung – und laut dem Artikel und aus meiner eigenen Erfahrung als Verbraucher ist das ein noch wichtigerer Faktor als Preis oder generelle Zufriedenheit mit einem Produkt oder Service. Warum sonst würden Leute von Luxusmarken wie Chanel oder Jaguar kaufen… „Man zahlt für den Namen”, sagt man – und das kommt daher, dass die Markenidentität ein Gefühl in uns auslöst, das wir mögen (oder auch nicht mögen – in dem Fall kaufen wir diese Marke oder von diesem Business nicht so gern beziehungsweise gehen bei der nächstbesten Gelegenheit zur Konkurrenz.)

Der Artikel im Harward Business Review benennt einige der häufigsten emotionalen Auslöser: das Gefühl, besonders zu sein, zum Beispiel. Weitere “beliebte“ Gefühle sind: Selbstbewusstsein und Hoffnung, Wohlbefinden, Abenteuer, Freiheit, Zugehörigkeit, etwas Gutes für die Umwelt tun, Sicherheit und Erfolg.

Mehr als zufrieden

Wenn das Storytelling eines Geschäfts, eines Unternehmens, eines Künstlers, oder einer Marke eins oder mehrere dieser Gefühle in einer Person auslöst, dann kann es gut sein, dass diese Person über kurz oder lang zum Fan wird. Solche Stories werden am effektivsten visuell erzählt, denn Bilder können innerhalb von Sekunden Emotionen in uns auslösen. Wenn wir uns mit dieser Story identifizieren können, dann wollen wir diese Marke unterstützen und kaufen gerne bei diesem Business ein. Und so kommt es eben, dass wir durchschnittlich zweimal so viel bei diesem Unternehmen ausgeben wie jemand, der der einfach nur die Basics bekommt (beispielsweise Design, Qualität, Funktionalität und Komfort).

Übrigens: Das zeigt auch, warum wir nicht jedem gefallen können, weil jeder andere Gefühlsauslöser hat und auf andere Stories anspricht. Und die besten Stories die wir erzählen können, die sind, die authentisch sind und „echt“ sind, also von uns kommen.

Aus Kunden werden Fans

Zurück zu diesem “Mechanismus” im Obst- Beispiel: Wenn ich superschöne Bilder von einem gemütlich aussehenden Obstladen sehe, kann mir das beispielsweise ein zu-Hause-Gefühl (Gefühl der Dazugehörigkeit) geben, oder das Gefühl von Wohlbefinden, oder Hoffnung auf Gesundheit und Fitness. Dann werde ich mich mit dem Laden emotional verbunden fühlen. Und wenn`s da das Obst gibt, das ich mag, dann kaufe ich da. Und nächste Woche vermutlich wieder. Ich werde den Laden auch meinen Freunden in der Nachbarschaft empfehlen. Denn ich bin ein Fan geworden und wünsche dem Laden Erfolg und will gern dazu beitragen. Damit ich die Story und die damit verbundenen Gefühle immer wieder erleben kann, wenn ich dort einkaufen gehe und wenn ich dessen Produkte zu Hause habe.

Für uns kreative Businesses oder Freiberufler heißt das, dass wir nicht achtlos irgendwelche schlecht aufgenommenen Produktbilder posten sollten, sondern immer darauf achten, dass unsere Visuals ein Gefühl transportieren. Und dann wär`s natürlich gut, wenn wir uns auf eine Handvoll ähnlicher Emotionen konzentrieren, damit unsere Botschaft klar erkennbar – und zu fühlen – ist.

PS. Auf den Bildern sind Hill & Szrok Butcher`s / Broadway Market/London, Village Organic bei Victoria Park/London und Pfirsiche im L’eau à la bouche/ Broadway Market.

Business Cinema

•°☆• A different kind of Business Portrait.. ✨
The magic of being in a new place for the first time.. for those who work in this place it may be nothing special but for me , looking through the images later, it was cinema. ☺️ °•☆•

Decide not to give up

eagles reutlingen

°•• Waited for a good spot in my Insta feed to place these images of the American Football players “Eagles Reutlingen”. Typed “sports quote” into Google for some caption and found such a good line: It not only goes for sportspeople but for anyone. Here is it: “ᴺᴱᵛᴱᴿ ᴳᴵᵛᴱ ᵁᴾ! ᶠᴬᴵᴸᵁᴿᴱ ᴬᴺᴰ ᴿᴱᴶᴱᶜᵀᴵᴼᴺ ᴬᴿᴱ ᴼᴺᴸᵞ ᵀᴴᴱ ᶠᴵᴿˢᵀ ˢᵀᴱᴾ ᵀᴼ ˢᵁᶜᶜᴱᴱᴰᴵᴺᴳ.” (- ᴶᴵᴹ ᵛᴬᴸᵛᴬᴺᴼ)

For me having decided ahead of time not to give up on “making it” as a photographer has been super valuable. I used to have doubts when being confronted with failure, and now I don’t. Because I have already decided that I won’t give up. And because I know it’s just normal to experience rejection or failure at times – it happens to anyone on the way to success. How else are we supposed to learn and become better? I’ve heard and read so often that having faith and refusing to give up is one of the major keys to success. I mean, otherwise, there wouldn’t be so many sayings and quotes of successful peops about the matter after all.

If you have set your heart on something – be it in sports, a career, or a personal goal – don’t allow yourself to become discouraged but decide ahead of time that you will keep going, keep believing, and that you will not give up! ☺️💛✌️ °•☆•

Extraordinary

ambition star hairdresser in front of sports jersey wall

Tugay Zeyrek is a hairdresser who works in his dad’s salon in a small town in Germany – and he cuts the hair of football stars and even music icons like Jason Derulo. When interviewing him I noticed quite a few things that we all can learn from him in order to achieve the extraordinary:

Have love and passion for an extra boost of energy (which you will need as you will read further down)

Tugay literally beamed when talking about his profession and story, and he was full of enthusiasm for what he is doing.

Never be big-headed but stay down-to-earth

During my stay at the salon, Tugay walked over to his regular customers, normal people without big names or big wallets, had a chat, called them by their names, and made sure they felt welcome and were happy with the service in the salon.

Keep on connecting

“When I was seventeen I already started to write to star managements but no one ever replied. Then I started to participate in hairdressers competitions and became world champion with the German Team. Eventually, a friend introduced me to a football player who played in the national team, and then one thing led to another.” Connections are key! I`ve heard that dozens of times and I can tell from my own experience that most of my jobs came through some sort of connection or referral. However, we need to get out there and actually make those connections. It is not a passive thing – waiting for a connection to show up – but it requires massive action: to show up for our connections and to get out there, let people know about our goals, and grab any opportunity to connect.

Do not give up and be bold

“I have often punted on getting into concerts, I climbed over fences, ran from security – all these kinds of things. Even when you have agreed with a star to meet them, the security may think you`re a crazy groupie. When I was meant to meet Jason Derulo at his concert, none of the security took me seriously. But I refused to give in until I finally managed to find a way past the security crew.” Ever since Tugay has cut Jason Derulos` hair several times!

Be ready anytime and say yes to the extraordinary

„For the MTV Music Awards in Bilbao, I drove 16 hours in my car. I cut the celebrities` hair, then drove back 16 hours. Often, stars call me up: Can you be in Berlin or whatever city tomorrow morning to cut my hair? And I will hop straight in my car and go! You need to be ready. Life is too short to be average.” Achieving extraordinary things requires extraordinary action. Makes sense doesn`t it? So don`t let chances go past. Let’s take every chance we can get and be ready!

Profession: Artist

singer songwriter with guitar photographed by Nadine Wilmanns

Profession: Artist

“It’s impossible to create work that both matters and pleases everyone.”

The other day, I`ve photographed singer and songwriter Lauranne Lukas for her new music project. She is a professional musician singing about her faith and things like personal development, and self-confidence. 

I love seeing creative people working on their careers. It is so much easier said than done! It takes determination, commitment and sacrifice. Also, it involves fighting self-doubt. As a professional artist you need to make yourself vulnerable. And that takes some courage, especially in the early stages while you`re not backed-up with a lot of success.

Because as a professional you can`t hide in your room doing what you do, but you need to get out and sell it to people. You need to say to strangers: Look, I`ve made this! And they then might say: I don`t like it. Or worse: It`s not good. As professional artists we have to get over this and keep on creating.

On a side note: When people say “It`s not good” – it means it`s not good FOR THEM or for a certain purpose. Who are they to judge if something is “good” or not? Someone else might see it entirely differently. And that`s all cool – as artists we can`t possibly cater to every taste.

Seth Godin writes in “The Practice”:

“A contemporary painter must ignore the criticism or disdain that comes from someone who’s hoping for a classical still life. (…) the work isn’t for them. ‘It’s not for you’ is the unspoken possible companion to ‘Here, I made this.’”

That said, of course we need to become better and better and improve our work constantly. And critique from someone who means well and who knows what he is talking about is super valuable. Yet, at no point we can expect EVERYBODY to like what we do. It`s important to focus on the actual work and not to get distracted by thoughts of what other people might say or think. “When we get really attached to how others will react to our work, we stop focusing on our work and begin to focus on controlling the outcome instead”, writes Seth Godin.

By focusing on our work (which we can control), not the outcome (which is out of our control), we will get better for those couple of people who our work is for: those who are actually touched by it and who will spread the word.  

Lauranne, I hope you push through any doubts and times of seemingly not moving forward! Never give up and keep focussing on the work is the number one rule for everyone who wants to be a professional creative.

And an artists` success is not only great for her or him, but for all of us. Because every dream pursued keeps the hope and wonder in all of us alive.

Beruf: Künstler

Beruf: Künstler

"Es ist unmöglich, Kunst zu machen, die wirklich etwas bedeutet und die allen gefällt."

Neulich habe ich Singer Songwriter Lauranne Lukas für ihr neues Musikprojekt fotografiert. Sie hat Musik zu ihrem Beruf gemacht und singt von ihrem Glauben und Dingen wie persönliche Entwicklung oder Selbstbewusstsein.

Ich freue mich immer zu sehen wie Künstler an ihrer Karriere arbeiten. Es ist so viel leichter gesagt als getan! Man braucht Entschlossenheit, andauernden Einsatz und muss auch manche Opfer bringen. Außerdem muss man immer wieder gegen Selbstzweifel kämpfen. Als professionelle Künstler muss man sich angreifbar machen. Und das verlangt Mut, vor allem in den Anfangsphasen, wenn man noch nicht so viele Erfolge in der Tasche hat.

Denn wenn du Kunst als Beruf machst, kannst du dich nicht in deinem Zimmer verstecken, und das machen worauf du gerade Lust hast, sondern du musst rausgehen und deine Kunst an den Mann bringen. Und zu Leuten sagen: Schau, das hab ich gemacht! Dann kann es sein, dass welche sagen: Mag ich nicht! Oder sogar: Das ist nicht gut. Als professioneller Künstler muss man sowas wegstecken und weiter machen.

Übrigens: Wenn Leute sagen “Das ist nicht gut“ heißt das „Das ist nicht gut FÜR MICH“ oder „nicht gut für einen bestimmten Zweck“. Wer sind die, um urteilen zu können, ob etwas gut ist oder nicht? Jemand anders könnte es völlig anders sehen. Und das ist alles cool – als Künstler können wir es unmöglich jedem Geschmack recht machen.

Marketing-Experte Seth Godin schreibt in „The Practice” (frei übersetzt):

“Ein Gegenwarts-Künstler muss die Kritik oder die Geringschätzung ignorieren, die von denen kommt, die auf ein klassisches Stillleben hoffen. (…) die Arbeit ist nicht für sie. ‘Es ist nicht für dich’ ist der unausgesprochene mögliche Begleiter von `Hier, das hab ich gemacht`.“

Natürlich sollten wir in unserer Arbeit ständig besser werden. Und Kritik von jemandem, der es gut meint und der weiß, wovon er spricht, ist super wertvoll. Aber wir können nie erwarten, dass JEDER mag, was wir machen. Es ist wichtig, dass wir uns auf die Arbeit an sich konzentrieren und uns nicht von Zweifeln ablenken lassen und von Gedanken daran, was andere Leute vielleicht denken oder nicht denken könnten. „Wenn wir davon abhängig werden, wie andere auf unsere Arbeit reagieren werden, hören wir auf, uns auf unsere Arbeit zu konzentrieren, sondern wir fangen an, stattdessen deren Wirkung kontrollieren zu wollen“, schreibt Seth Godin (frei übersetzt).

Indem wir uns auf unsere Arbeit konzentrieren (was innerhalb unserer Kontrolle ist) und nicht deren Wirkung (die nicht in unserer Kontrolle liegt), werden wir besser für diejenigen, für die unsere Kunst ist: die, die wir tatsächlich damit berühren und die das dann auch weitertragen.

Lauranne, ich hoffe, dass du dich von Zweifeln nicht beirren lässt und auch dann weitergehst, wenn sich nichts zu bewegen scheint. Nicht aufzugeben und sich immer weiter auf seine Arbeit zu konzentrieren ist die Regel Nummer eins für jeden, der Kreativität zu seinem Beruf machen will.

Und der Erfolg ist nicht nur super für den Künstler selbst, sondern für uns alle. Denn ich finde, jeder Traum, den jemand verfolgt, lässt uns alle weiter staunen und hoffen.

Not for everyone

abstract of two cars by Nadine Wilmanns

Not for everyone

As creatives, as well as human beings, it`s so important to understand – and accept – that our work is not for everyone. That`s in fact not just the case with art but with almost all things. Cars for example: not everyone would love a classic car. And there are others who wouldn`t want any other car but a classic car.

It is impossible to please everyone, but it is possible – and much more effective – to please someone or a few people. I`ve been listening to Seth Godin lately and he says: “It is impossible to create work that both matters and pleases everyone.” And: “Don`t be a purple drop in the ocean but be a purple drop in a swimming pool. Walk away from the ocean and look for a swimming pool.”

If we want to create work that truly matters to SOME, then we need to stop trying to dilute it, so that EVERYONE can be happy with it. We need the confidence and the courage to tell those people who don`t like it: Sorry, but this is not for you. If we want to create authentic and strong work, it can`t be for everyone and that`s ok.

"You are your most important audience"

This doesn`t mean that we shouldn`t learn and improve and progress. But, while I want to stay open to constructive critique, I as well want to stay true to myself. Photographer David duChemin writes in his book ‘The heart of photography’: “You are your first and most important audience.”

There will always be stuff that can be improved, and we`re just human. But while we keep making progress and working on our art, we shouldn`t run after compliments or try to please everyone. We need to be able to distinguish: Does the person, who doesn`t like my work have a point, and is there an opportunity for me to learn? Or is my work just not for him? Both are just fine.

Nicht für jeden

As Kreative und als Mensch ist es wichtig zu verstehen und ok damit zu sein, dass unsere Arbeit nicht für jeden ist. Das gilt ja für fast alles, nicht nur für Kunst. Autos zum Beispiel: Nicht jeder will unbedingt einen Oldtimer. Aber für manche gibt es kein besseres Auto.

Es ist unmöglich, jedem zu gefallen, aber es ist möglich – und viel effektiver – jemanden oder ein paar Leute anzusprechen. Ich habe in letzter Zeit viel vom Marketing-Experten Seth Godin gehört und er sagt: „Es ist unmöglich Arbeiten zu produzieren, die gleichzeitig einen Unterschied machen und jedem gefallen.“ Und: „Sei kein lila Tropfen im Ozean, sondern sei ein lila Tropfen in einem Swimming Pool. Wende dich vom Ozean ab und schau nach einem Swimmingpool.“

Wenn wir Arbeit schaffen wollen, die MANCHEN Leuten wirklich etwas bedeutet, dann müssen wir aufhören sie zu verwässern, damit sie JEDERMANNS Sache wird.  Wir brauchen den Mut und das Vertrauen, den Leuten, die sie nicht mögen, zu sagen: Sorry, das ist nicht für dich. Wenn wir authentische und starke Arbeiten machen wollen, kann das nicht für jeden sein und das ist ok.

"Du bist dein wichtigstes Publikum"

Das bedeutet nicht, dass wir nicht lernen, besser werden und vorankommen sollen. Aber während ich offen für konstruktive Kritik sein möchte, will ich auch mir selbst treu bleiben. Fotograf David duChemin schreibt in seinem Buch ,Das Herz der Fotografie‘: „Du bist dein erstes und wichtigstes Publikum.“

Es wird immer Dinge geben, die wir verbessern können und wir sind nur Menschen. Aber während wir an uns und unserer Kunst arbeiten, sollten wir nicht Komplimenten hinterherrennen oder versuchen, jedem zu gefallen. Wir müssen unterscheiden können: Ist an dem, was die Person, die meine Arbeit nicht mag, was dran – ist das also eine Möglichkeit für mich was zu lernen? Oder ist meine Arbeit einfach nicht für ihn?“ Beides ist ok.

Begin

Begin Mirror Selfie Fashion memories t-Shirt Darling in mirror

If you can`t find the comment section at the end of the post, click on the heading and check again. ^

Wenn du das Kommentar-Feld am Ende des Posts nicht siehst, klicke auf die Überschrift. ^

Begin

“Some of the best, most interesting photo essays and stories you`re going to find are your neighbors, your family, and the things in everyday life.

(…) The access is what makes a great story. And we all have access to our sisters, our nephews, our neighbors, our colleagues, our church, people you meet every day,…

(…) You don`t need a press pass to photograph your nephew`s football game. And you don`t need a press pass if your granddad is getting ready to die and he`s got one year left and you have the opportunity to sit down with him and take pictures and do recordings and find out what it was like for him when he was nineteen or whatever.

You know these are those great stories and the camera gives you a reason to go and ask the questions and be part of these people`s lives. Don`t ever use the excuse ‘I don`t know what to photograph’ – it`s all out there. Go do it.” – quote by Paul Taggart (who was one of THE biggest influences in my journey as a photographer)

Most important lesson in photography

Don`t wait for extraordinary things like a holiday to happen in order to take out your camera and take pictures. Start where you are today. If you don`t have a camera take your phone. If you don`t have your phone take pen and paper. The most important thing is that you begin and don`t wait.

Beginne

“Einige der besten, interessantesten Foto-Essays und Stories, die du finden wirst, sind deine Nachbarn, deine Familie und die Dinge des Alltags. (…) Den Zugang zu der Story zu haben, darauf kommt es bei einer guten Geschichte an. Und wir alle haben Zugang zu unseren Schwestern, unseren Neffen, unseren Nachbarn, unseren Kollegen, unserer Kirche, den Leuten, die wir jeden Tag treffen,…  (…) Du brauchst keinen Presseausweis, um das Fußballspiel deines Neffen zu fotografieren. Und du brauchst auch keinen Presseausweis, wenn dein Opa bald stirbt und er ein Jahr zu leben hat und du hast die Möglichkeit mit ihm zusammen zu sitzen, Fotos und Aufnahmen zu machen und herauszufinden, wie es für ihn war, als er neunzehn war und solche Sachen. Du weißt, dass das die großen Stories sind und deine Kamera liefert dir den Grund hinzugehen und Fragen zu stellen und am Leben dieser Leute Teil zu haben. Komm nie mit der Ausrede an ‘Ìch weiß nicht, was ich fotografieren soll’ – es ist alles da. Leg los!” Zitat von Paul Taggart (der mich auf meiner Reise als Fotografin mit am meisten beeinflusst hat).

Wichtigste Lektion in der Fotografie

Warte nicht darauf, das was Außergewöhnliches passiert, wie dein Urlaub, um deine Kamera auszupacken und Bilder zu machen. Starte wo du heute gerade bist. Wenn du keine Kamera hast, nimm dein Handy. Wenn du kein Handy hast, nimmt Stift und Papier. Das Wichtigste ist, dass du beginnst und nicht wartest.

On finding “the Why” and time

enjoy. Mirror selfie. Why and time

(Time capsules)

Do you know why you do the job that you do? Do you know “your Why”? What is it that makes you passionate about your job? Lately, I`m trying to reveal exactly that. As a photographer, I obviously love taking and looking at photographs. Why though? What is it about photography that makes me love it so much that I choose to do it daily as my job?

One main “why” is obviously time. I believe that time is most precious and needs to be witnessed and lived, not just passed. And by that, I mean both the good and the hard times as heart-breaking they can feel. Taking pictures is to capture time capsules, so that you may see the value of the time given to you. So that you may become aware of what`s profound and important for you, your business, or what you`re doing.

...for its time

Time is so valuable because it is limited. We tend to forget that. Often, we treat time like money which can be regained and multiplied. But this is not possible with time.

Time is always different. A holiday now will be different than a holiday in five years. A day at work now will be different from a day at work in ten years. It may be entirely different next week. “God has made everything beautiful FOR ITS OWN TIME”, says King Solomon in the Bible. We cannot get back time. We need to live it now and make the best out of it. This is why it matters so much to be aware of the beauty in each ordinary day.

At the same time, we long for time to last, for moments to stay with us. Solomon writes: “HE has planted eternity in the human heart”. Maybe that`s why we love time capsules like paintings or photographs.

...against forgetting

There was one quote that I`ve read that made me realize that I wanted to be a professional photographer. I think I`ve read it on the tube in London on my one-and-a-half-hours-journey to work at the high street fashion supplier, about five years ago.

The book is called “H is for Hawk” by Helen Macdonald and she talks about her father who had just died and who was a photographer:

“… All of those thousands upon thousands of photographs (…) Each one a record, a testament, a bulwark against forgetting, against nothingness, against death. 

Look, this happened. A thing happened, and now it will never un - happen.

Here it is in a photograph: a baby putting its tiny hand in the wrinkled palm of an octogenarian.  A fox running across a woodland path and a man raising a gun to shoot it.  A plane crash. (…)  All these things happened, and my father committed them to a memory that wasn’t just his own, but the world’s. 

My father’s life wasn’t about disappearance.  His was a life that worked against it.”

I still think these are some of the most beautiful lines describing photography. It`s about the fascination and struggle with time. About creating time-capsules by taking pictures.

Ironically, it´s the very fact that we cannot stop time from passing, that ultimately makes moments special and enchanting.

The beauty of a moment and a life is that it`s one of a kind and that it won`t last forever. Even our own memories will fail to remember some of the moments that we`ve lived.

Occasions and special events, as well as routines or everyday habits – they stand for a certain era in our lives. We know that this era will end at some point and that`s what makes it bittersweet and heartbreakingly beautiful when we dare to feel this truth.

Warum und Zeit

(Zeit-Kapseln)

Weißt du, warum du den Beruf machst, den du machst? Kennst du “dein Warum”? Was ist es, das dich an deinem Beruf begeistert? Ich versuche zur Zeit genau das herauszufinden und zu formulieren. Als Fotografin liebe ich es natürlich zu fotografieren und Fotos anzuschauen. Warum aber? Was ist an der Fotografie dran, dass ich sie so sehr liebe, dass ich sie jeden Tag machen will?  

Ein großes “Warum” ist natürlich Zeit. Ich finde, dass Zeit so wertvoll ist und nicht nur verbracht, sondern erlebt und wahrgenommen werden muss. Fotos sind wie eine Art Zeit-Kapseln. Sie helfen uns dabei, den echten Wert der Zeit zu sehen, die uns gegeben ist. Dadurch kann uns bewusst werden, was wirklich wichtig für uns ist, wichtig für unser Business und für das, was wir tun.  

...zu seiner Zeit

Zeit ist so besonders wertvoll, weil sie begrenzt ist. Wir vergessen das immer wieder. Oft gehen wir mit Zeit wie mit Geld um, das wiedergewonnen und vervielfacht werden kann. Aber mit Zeit ist das nicht möglich.

Zeit ist immer anders. Ein Urlaub jetzt wird anders sein als einer in fünf Jahren. Ein Tag bei der Arbeit wird heute anders sein als einer in zehn Jahren. Schon nächste Woche kann vieles ganz anders sein. „Gott hat alles schön gemacht ZU SEINER ZEIT“, sagt König Solomon in der Bibel. Wir können Zeit nicht zurückbekommen. Wir müssen sie jetzt erleben und das Beste draus machen. Deswegen ist es so wichtig, dass wir uns der Schönheit bewusst werden, die wir in jedem ganz normalen Tag finden können.  

Gleichzeitig sehnen wir uns danach, dass etwas bleibt, dass Momente bei uns bleiben. Solomon schreibt: “… auch hat Gott die Ewigkeit in das Herz der Menschen gelegt.” Das ist vielleicht der Grund warum wir Zeitkapseln wie Fotos oder Malereien so lieben.  

...gegen das Vergessen

Es gibt ein Buchzitat, das ich mal gelesen habe und das in mir den Wunsch geweckt hat, Fotografie als Beruf zu machen. Ich glaube ich hab es vor ungefähr fünf Jahren in der Tube in London gelesen, als ich gerade auf meinem anderthalb Stunden Weg zur Arbeit bei der High Street Modefirma war.

Das Buch heißt “H is for Hawk” (“H wie Habicht”) von Helen Macdonald und sie erzählt von ihrem Vater, der gerade gestorben ist und der Fotojournalist war:

“… All die tausenden Fotografien (…) Jede ist eine Aufzeichnung, ein Testament, ein Bollwerk gegen das Vergessen, gegen das Nichts, gegen den Tod.

Schau, das ist passiert. Etwas ist passiert und jetzt wird es nicht mehr un- passieren.

Hier ist es in einer Fotografie: ein Baby, das seine winzige Hand in die runzlige Handfläche einer Achtzigjährigen legt. Ein Fuchs, der über einen Waldweg rennt und ein Mann, der sein Gewehr hebt, um ihn zu erschießen. Ein Flugzeugabsturz. (…) All diese Dinge sind passiert und mein Vater hat sie in einem Gedächtnis eingeprägt, das nicht nur sein eigenes war, sondern das der Welt.

Das Leben meines Vaters handelte nicht vom Verschwinden. Sein Leben war eins, das dem Verschwinden entgegengewirkt hat.”

Ich finde immer noch, das das eines der schönsten Zitate ist, die Fotografie beschreiben. Es geht um die Faszination und die Herausforderung mit der Zeit. Es geht darum mit dem Bildermachen Zeitkapseln einzufangen.

Ironischerweise ist es genau das, dass wir Zeit nicht beim Vorbeigehen aufhalten können, was Momente besonders und bezaubernd macht.

Die Schönheit eines Moments und eines Lebens ist, dass sie einzigartig sind und nicht für die Ewigkeit bleiben. Sogar unser eigenes Gedächtnis wird sich irgenwann nicht mehr an Momente erinnern, die wir gelebt haben.

Besondere Ereignisse oder Events, genauso wie Routine und alltägliche Gewohnheiten – alle stehen für eine bestimmte Ära in unserem Leben. Wir wissen, dass diese Ära irgendwann zu Ende geht und das macht es bittersüß, zauberhaft und herzzerreißend schön, wenn wir es wagen, diese Wahrheit zu fühlen.

Downtime

Appointments for Downtime

Appointments for Downtime

“We are human beings, not human doings.”

This post is an extension of my last week`s post “Should-Do`s“.

As freelancers, we sometimes are tempted to work 24/7. Yet, by doing that, we risk losing our joy for what we`re doing. As well as tasks and Should-Dos I need to schedule time each day to just do nothing productive at all. To give my head some downtime, to free my mind, and to keep energy flowing.

If I don`t schedule that time in my planner I end up working overtime often which is counterproductive for all sorts of reasons.

Commit to some downtime

Appointments for our downtime are just as important as appointments for our Should-Do`s. If not even more important. After all, no one will regret having not hoovered often enough when dying. But it`s more likely that we regret not having taken enough time for fun.

The purpose of our calendar is to protect us from working too much and under stress. It`s there to free our minds. Not to make us work like a robot.

So, we need to schedule time for doing non-productive fun stuff and commit to that plan. If there is not enough time for this kind of downtime, then we need to postpone something else. Or we need to in future say no to work that is threatening to take that space in our calendar.

This is often hard as a freelancer – especially if it`s a good or important job. But if I never say no and try to please everyone, I`ll pay for that later with the stinging regret that I haven`t savoured the lifetime that has been given to me. Plus, I risk losing my joy altogether and end up grumpy and stressed – and that`s not gonna serve anyone.

No performance

I guess everyone needs to find his or her own balance between work and downtime. I generally need the weekend off, at the very least Sunday (or any day for that matter). Plus a minimum of one hour a day to do nothing productive. And I don`t mean six 10-minute breaks adding up to one hour, but one complete hour at a stretch. What I do during this time mustn`t be performance-related all. That could be going out with friends, fun-reading, watching a movie, hanging about. Basically, being lazy.

I still take photographs in my free time, too, as that`s just what I like to do after all. But that`s just for fun then and the picture doesn`t need to face any judgment, not even my own. They don`t have to fulfill any criteria except that it`s what I feel doing at the moment.

What do you enjoy doing without any pressure? And do you set aside time for downtime every day?

Termine für`s Faulsein

Dieser Post ist eine Ergänzung zu dem Post von letzter Woche: “Should-Do`s“.

Als Freiberufler sind wir manchmal versucht, rund um die Uhr und die ganze Woche zu arbeiten. Aber wenn wir das machen, kann es passieren. dass wir unsere Freude an dem was wir tun, verlieren. Genauso wie Aufgaben und Should-Do`s muss ich jeden Tag Zeit für`s Faulsein einplanen. Damit meine ich, was zu machen, was überhaupt nicht produktiv ist. So kann ich meinem Gehirn eine Auszeit geben, den Kopf freibekommen und die Energielevels oben halten. 

Wenn ich diese Zeit nicht als Termin in meinem Terminplaner einplane, dann werde ich dazu verleitet sein, Überstunden zu machen. Und das ist aus zehntausend Gründen kontraproduktiv.  

Termine für`s Faulsein einhalten

Termine für`s Faulsein sind genauso wichtig wie die für unsere Should-Do`s. Wenn nicht sogar noch wichtiger. Schließlich werden wir es nicht bereuen zu wenig Staub gesaugt zu haben, wenn wir sterben. Sondern wir werden es eher bereuen, uns nicht genügend Zeit zum Spaßhaben genommen zu haben. 

Der Zweck unseres Terminplaners ist es, uns vor zu viel Arbeit und vor Stress zu schützen. Er soll uns dabei helfen, unseren Kopf frei zu bekommen. Und nicht, wie ein Roboter zu arbeiten.

Also müssen wir Zeit einplanen für Dinge, die wir einfach nur zum Spaß machen ohne produktiv sein zu müssen. Und diese Zeit dann auch einhalten. Wenn nicht genügend Zeit dafür da ist, dann müssen wir was anderes verschieben. Oder in Zukunft nein sagen zu Arbeit, die uns diesen Platz im Kalender wegnimmt. 

Das ist als Freiberufler oft schwierig, vor allem wenn es sich um einen guten  oder wichtigen Job handelt. Aber wenn ich nie nein sage und immer versuche, allen gerecht zu werden, dann bezahle ich später damit, dass ich es bereue die Lebenszeit, die mir gegeben wurde, nicht wirklich ausgekostet zu haben.  Und ich riskiere, dass ich meine Freude ganz verliere, dass ich schlecht gelaunt und gestresst bin – und davon hat ja wirklich keiner was. 

Keine Leistung

Ich vermute, dass jeder seine eigene Balance finden muss, zwischen Arbeit und Faulsein. Ich brauche das Wochenende frei, zumindest den Sonntag (oder eben einen Tag in der Woche). Und mindestens eine Stunde am Tag, um nichts Produktives zu machen. Damit meine ich nicht sechs 10-Minuten-Pausen, die eine Stunde ergeben, sondern eine Stunde am Stück. Was ich in dieser Zeit mache, darf nicht irgendwie leistungsbezogen sein. Das könnte zum Beispiel mit Freunden rausgehen sein, lesen zum Vergnügen, Film schauen, rumhängen. Also im Grunde faul sein.

Oder auch fotografieren, schließlich mache ich das gern. Aber dann eben nur zum Spaß, das heißt, die Bilder müssen nicht einer Bewertung standhalten, auch nicht meiner eigenen. Sie müssen nicht irgendwelche Kriterien erfüllen außer, dass mir in dem Moment danach ist.

Was machst du gerne ohne Druck? Und planst du dir jeden Tag Zeit ein, um faul zu sein?

Should-Do`s

Appointments for the Should Do`s - do all things with love photogaphed by Nadine Wilmanns

Appointments for the Should-Do`s

Appointments for the Should-Do`s

Do you have a lot of „Should Do´s” in your head? I have, and I need to get rid of them. Not only do they make me feel overwhelmed, stressed, anxious and moody. But they also rob my energy, my joy and they make me less or even non-productive. Plus they suffocate any creativity.

“Do all things with love”, advises the Bible (in 1 Corinthians 16,14, in case you wanna look it up). But how can I do things with love when feeling stressed and overwhelmed?

When I constantly think I should do this and that, I cannot concentrate on what I`m doing at the moment, let alone enjoy. And often when there are too many Should Do`s floating in my head, I get literally paralyzed and don`t get anything done at all. Thus, Should Do`s are not serving me at all.

Time Management

As a freelancer this has been one of my biggest challenges. When I was an employee, I used to go to work, knowing I am meant to be there, peacefully doing my stuff, knowing what I had to do – happy days. As a creative freelancer, time management and Should Do`s have become less straightforward and more of an issue. So I need to come up with a system. There`s a LinkedIn Learning Course on Time Management by Dave Crenshaw and I`m gonna implement some of his advice in my system.

Appointments for peace of mind

So here`s my plan how to get rid of the Should Do`s: I gather them all in one To-Do list, and once a day, I give them appointments in my calendar. Or I give them an appointment straight away. This way they are kind of “done”, out of my head and in my calendar.

For example, I really should take my passport picture. I keep having that on my mind for days, even weeks now – have I done it? No. Because it was just a Should Do in my head, along with 20 other Should Do`s, and not an appointment in my calendar. Now, it`s scheduled for tomorrow at 4pm.

I`ll keep you updated with my findings about how to have more peace of mind as a creative freelancer. Meanwhile, I would be happy to hear or read about your insights. How are you managing your “Should do`s” and your time? Do you have a system in place and do you take control?

Update: Double the estimated time for a task

Only after 2 days, I have noticed: when I think something will take me one hour, it will usually take me two. So I need to schedule double the time of what I would estimate for any task. Otherwise, I end up in a hurry and stress – and the whole point of planning is to get rid of stress. 

Update: Be open to reschedule when needed

Life happens, and sometimes you need an extra pause because an event has thrown you off your path. We are humans and not machines. While we generally should commit to our schedule (otherwise it won`t be much help), we still can ask ourselves: What would serve me now in this situation? What would do me good? Maybe it`s smarter to reschedule something to free space for a much-needed walk or a bit of just hanging about. Be open to reschedule when life throws unexpected challenges at you. The goal of making appointments for your “Should-Do`s” is peace of mind. Not just working things off like a robot not listening to your needs in a given situation. 

Update: Maybe-List

If there are simply too many Should-Do`s that need to be scheduled so they just don`t fit in our calendar, we need to radically prioritize. What is truly important, meaning what will still matter in years? What is so urgent that it has to be done in order to avoid serious consequences? These things are to be scheduled in the calendar. Everything that is not so important goes to the “Maybe-List”. This way, they are still recorded and out of our heads. But we don`t NEED to do them anytime soon (or ever). 

Update: Post-it-Technique

If I`ve got a lot of tasks that I could do “anytime”, I often find it hard to give them a fixed appointment. It has then helped me to write those Should-Do`s on a post-it each. Then I pin or stick them on a wall, table, cardboard, or styrofoam board and set myself a deadline. I divide the number of tasks by the number of workdays until my deadline. So if I got two weeks for 17 tasks, I would wanna divide those 17 tasks by the ten workdays, that`s 1,7. That means, I wanna bin two tasks a day, and it`s not an issue if I only bin one on a few days. However, when working with the post-it-technique, I do need to leave some leeway in my calendar though, and I need to be very mindful to not be “overbooked”. 

Read the complementary post:

Downtime

 

Termine für die Should-Do`s

Hast du viele “Should Do`s” im Kopf? Also schwirren viele Sachen in deinem Kopf herum, die du eigentlich dringend erledigen solltest?  Bei mir schwirren viele und ich muss sie loswerden. Sie machen mir nicht nur Stress, Sorgen und schlechte Laune. Sondern sie rauben mir auch Energie und Freude. Und dazu machen sie mich weniger produktiv oder sogar völlig unproduktiv. Außerdem ersticken sie jede Kreativität.

“Macht alles mit Liebe“, rät die Bibel (in 1 Korinther 16, 14, falls du nachschauen willst). Aber wie kann ich Dinge mit Liebe tun, wenn ich gestresst und genervt bin? Wenn ich denke, dass ich eigentlich noch dies und jenes tun sollte, kann ich mich nicht gut auf das konzentrieren, was ich gerade mache. Ganz zu schweigen von Genießen. Und oft, wenn es zu viele Should Do`s in meinem Kopf gibt, fühle ich mich richtiggehend gelähmt und kriege gar nichts mehr hin. Also helfen mir Should Do`s überhaupt null.

Zeit-Management

Seit ich Freiberuflerin bin, ist das eine meiner größten Herausforderungen. Als Angestellte bin ich einfach zur Arbeit gegangen, wusste, dass da jetzt mein Platz ist, habe in Ruhe meinen Kram gemacht und wusste was ich zu tun hatte – easy. Als kreative Freiberuflerin sind Zeit-Management und Should Do`s komplizierter geworden. Also muss ich mir ein gut funktionierendes System überlegen. Es gibt einen LinkedIn Learning Kurs über Zeit-Management von Dave Crenshaw und ich habe vor, einige seiner Tipps in mein System zu übernehmen.

Termine für innere Ruhe

Hier ist mein Plan, wie ich Should Do´s loswerden möchte: Ich sammle alle Should Do´s in meiner To-Do-Liste auf den Leerseiten in meinem Timer. Und einmal am Tag gebe ich ihnen Termine in meinem Kalender. Oder ich gebe dem Should Do direkt einen Termin, sobald es mir in den Kopf fliegt. Was einen Termin hat, kann ich von der To-Do-Liste streichen. Denn sie sind dann praktisch “erledigt”, aus meinem Kopf raus und in meinem Kalender.

Zum Beispiel sollte ich dringend Passbilder von mir machen. Ich habe das seit Tagen und Wochen im Kopf – hab ich`s gemacht? Nein. Weil es nur als Should Do in meinem Kopf geschwirrt ist, zusammen mit 20 anderen Should Do`s. Es hatte keinen Termin in meinem Kalender. Jetzt habe ich es für morgen um 16 Uhr eingeplant.

Ich halte euch auf dem Laufenden, was ich darüber herausfinde, wie man als kreativer Freiberufler die innere Ruhe behält – oder wiederkriegt. Erzähl mir inzwischen gern von deinen Tipps, Ideen und Erfahrungen. Wie behältst du die Kontrolle über deine Should Do`s und deine Zeit? 

Update: Verdopple die geschätzte Zeit für eine Aufgabe

Schon nach zwei Tagen habe ich Folgendes festgestellt: Wenn ich denke, dass etwas eine Stunde dauert, dann dauert es normalerweise zwei. Das heißt, ich muss zweimal so viel Zeit für eine Aufgabe einplanen, als geschätzt. Ansonsten finde ich mich in Eile und Stress wieder. Und der Grund, warum ich plane ist ja gerade keinen Stress zu haben.

Update: Sei ok damit, bei Bedarf umzuplanen

Im Leben passiert manchmal Unerwartetes und manchmal brauchst du eine extra Pause, weil dich etwas aus der Bahn geworfen hat. Wir sind Menschen und keine Maschinen. Zwar sollten wir uns an unseren Plan halten (sonst macht das Planen ja keinen Sinn), aber wir können uns schon auch fragen: Was wäre jetzt gerade gut für mich? Was würde mir wirklich helfen und was kann ich hier für mich tun? Manchmal ist es klüger, umzuplanen, um Zeit für einen Spaziergang zu haben, oder um einfach nur ein bisschen rumzuhängen. Sei ok damit, umzuplanen, wenn du Zeit fürs Nichtstun brauchst oder wenn du vor einer unerwarteten Herausforderung stehst. Wir vergeben ja Termine an unsere Should-Do`s damit wir ruhig und entspannt sein können. Nicht um wie ein Roboter eins nach dem anderen abzuarbeiten ohne darauf zu achten, wie es uns gerade geht.  

Update: Vielleicht-Liste

Wenn es einfach zu viele Should-Do`s gibt, die eingeplant werden wollen und unseren Terminplaner überfluten, dann müssen wir radikal Prioritäten setzen. Was ist wirklich wichtig, also was wird für uns auch nach Jahren noch von Bedeutung sein? Was ist so dringend, dass wir es zeitnah einplanen müssen um schwerwiegende Konsequenzen zu vermeiden? Diese Dinge müssen einen Termin bekommen. Alles, was nicht so wichtig ist, kommt auf die “Vielleicht-Liste”. So sind sie doch aufgeschrieben und aus unserem Kopf raus. Aber wir müssen sie nicht so bald (oder auch gar nicht unbedingt) erledigen. 

Update: Vielleicht-Liste

Wenn ich viele Aufgaben habe, die ich “irgendwann” machen kann, dann fällt es mir oft schwer, für sie fixe Termine festzulegen. Da hat es mir geholfen, jede dieser Aufgaben auf jeweils ein Post-it zu schreiben. Dann pinne oder klebe ich sie an eine Wand, auf einen Tisch, einen Karton oder ein Styropor-Brett und gebe mir eine Deadline. Ich teile die Anzahl der Aufgaben durch die Nummer der Arbeitstage bis zur Deadline. Also wenn ich zwei Wochen für 17 Aufgaben habe, dann würde ich 17 Aufgaben durch 10 Arbeitstage teilen, gibt 1,7. Das heißt, ich will pro Tag zwei Aufgaben-Post-its in den Müll machen und es ist kein Problem, wenn ich an manchen Tagen nur eins erledige. Wenn ich die Post-it-Technik anwende, dann muss ich dafür allerdings Luft in meinem Kalender lassen und muss wirklich darauf achten mich nicht voll zu planen. 

Lies ergänzend dazu:

Downtime

 

Fashion Storytelling

X fashion storytelling Fashion and Lifestyle Photography Portfolio Nadine Wilmanns

Fashion Storytelling

These days, a lot is talked about the future of fashion and how fashion companies can survive. A few months back I had an interesting interview with Prof. Dr. Jochen Strähle, head of the fashion and textile faculty at Reutlingen University. He says: „80 Million people will always need something to wear and there will always be demand for personal expression. Constant change is the very nature of fashion and creativity is rooted in change. If newness is perceived as a crisis then fashion has been in a crisis for the past hundred years.”

What struck me is, that he immediately referred to personal expression. And after all, that`s what fashion is about, and therein lies the opportunity for every designer and every brand.

For example, Michael Kors: Personally, I would rather stuff my things in the pockets of my jacket than using a bag with the MK logo on it. But there are others that are crazy about it. On Black Friday there are queues at the Michael Kors Outlet in Metzingen beginning far outside the store entrance. In fact, Michael Kors usually has the longest queue of all the outlets.

Not everybodys` darling

And there`s the trick: It`s polarizing. Some absolutely love it, some totally hate it. So, as much as I don`t like the brand, they`re doing something right: They`re not everybody’s darling. They aren`t trying to please everyone. They´re not trying to be somewhere in the middle, catering for as many as possible, but they stand for something distinct.

When I think of Michael Kors, I immediately have a scene, like a short film, in my mind: a posh girl with a lot of make-up. She parties with other posh people in modern-looking locations where expensive cars are parked outside. When thinking of the brand Patagonia, I imagine a fit-looking girl without makeup and with untidy hair. She`s sitting all smiles outside a wooden cabin in the mountains with her friends enjoying a coffee and a sunrise. If I wanted to live like a very cool, elegant, successful-looking businesswoman, jumping from one important meeting to the next even more important conference, I would be drawn to Hugo Boss.

fashion storytelling Happiness Factor people on bench for fashion photo

Personally, I love Vintage, because I associate it with coolness, nonchalance, city-life, and sophisticated style. With going car-boot-sales, free exhibitions, and cheap coffee shops while living on some freelance jobs. Not that I necessarily have all that, but I would like it. And it matches the story I want to tell about myself. So, I wear it.

Storytelling and identity

It`s all stereotypes of course, and our own real-life story has many more layers than that. But these images are giving the brand its character. It`s something, that people can identify with – or not. Fashion is not just items of clothes, but a way for people to express and distinguish themselves.

It`s all about storytelling. That`s why fashion photography is so important. It tells a story and it shapes a clear image and feeling about a brand. Knowingly or not, we want to tell our story and choose which stories we can match with ours and which dreams we want to be part of.

What kind of fashion or brands do you feel drawn to and why? Have you ever bought an item just because it made you think of a scene or an image or a dream about how you would like to be?

Mode Storytelling

In letzter Zeit wird viel darüber gesprochen, wie die Zukunft der Mode aussieht und wie Mode-Unternehmen überleben können. Vor ein paar Monaten hatte ich ein interessantes Interview mit Prof. Dr. Jochen Strähle, Dekan der Fakultät Textil und Design an der Hochschule Reutlingen. Er sagt: „80 Millionen Menschen werden immer etwas zum Anziehen brauchen und es wird immer Bedarf nach persönlichem Ausdruck geben. Ständiger Umbruch ist Kennzeichen der Modeindustrie und darin sehen viele die Kreativität. Wenn Neues als Krise verstanden wird, dann ist die Textilindustrie seit hundert Jahren in der Krise.“

Was mir dabei aufgefallen ist: Er hat sofort auf den persönlichen Ausdruck verwiesen. Und schließlich geht es ja in der Mode genau darum. Darin liegt die Chance für jeden Designer und jede Marke.

Beispiel Michael Kors: Ich persönlich würde meine Sachen lieber in meine Jackentaschen stopfen, als eine Tasche mit dem MK-Label zu tragen. Aber andere sind ganz verrückt nach diesen Taschen. An Black Friday sind vor dem Michael Kors Outlet regelmäßig lange Schlangen – bis weit vor dem Ladeneingang. Tatsächlich hat Michael Kors meist die längste Schlange von allen Outlets.

Nicht Everybody`s Darling

Und hier ist der Trick: Die Marke ist polarisierend. Manche lieben sie und manche hassen sie. So wenig ich MK mag, sie machen etwas richtig: Sie sind nicht „Everybody`s Darling“. Sie versuchen nicht, allen zu gefallen. Sie bemühen sich nicht darum, irgendwo in der Mitte zu schwimmen, um so vielen wie möglich gerecht zu werden. Sondern sie haben eine klare Position und stehen für etwas Bestimmtes.

Wenn ich an Michael Kors denke, dann habe ich sofort eine Szene, einen kleinen Film, vor Augen: eine gestylte, posh aussehende Frau mit viel Make-up und Glamour. Sie feiert mit anderen schicken Leuten in modernen Locations, vor denen teure Autos geparkt sind.

Wenn ich an die Marke Patagonia denke, stelle ich mir ein gutaussehendes junges Mädchen vor, ohne Makeup und mit unordentlichen Haaren. Sie sitzt lachend mit ihren Freunden vor einer Holzhütte und genießt Kaffee und Sonnenaufgang.

Wenn ich von einem Leben als coole, elegante, erfolgreich aussehende Geschäftsfrau träumen würde, die von einem wichtigen Meeting zur nächsten noch wichtigeren Konferenz wandelt, dann würde es mich zu Hugo Boss ziehen.

fashion storytelling Your story Happiness Factor Fashion Photography McWilmanns Nadine Wilmanns

Persönlich mag ich Vintage, weil ich es mit Coolness, Lässigkeit, Stadtleben und gutem Style verbinde. Mit Flohmarktbesuchen, zu Ausstellungen mit freiem Eintritt gehen, billigen Cafés und von Freiberufler-Jobs leben. Nicht, dass ich all das unbedingt habe, aber ich hätte es gern. Und es passt zu der Geschichte, die ich gern über mich erzählen will. Also trage ich Vintage.

Storytelling und Identität

Natürlich sind das alles Stereotypen und die Geschichte unseres Lebens hat viel mehr Facetten. Aber solche Bilder geben einer Marke ihren Charakter. Das ist etwas, mit dem sich Leute identifizieren können – oder eben nicht. Mode ist nicht nur Kleidung, sondern eine Möglichkeit sich auszudrücken und abzugrenzen.

Es geht immer ums Storytelling. Deswegen ist Modefotografie so wichtig. Sie erzählt eine Geschichte und sie formt ein klares Bild und Gefühl einer Marke.  Bewusst oder unbewusst wollen wir unsere Geschichte erzählen und wählen, welche Geschichten zu unseren eigenen passen und von welchen Träumen wir Teil sein wollen.

Welche Mode oder welche Marken ziehst du gern an und warum? Kaufst du manchmal Kleidungsstücke, nur weil sie dich an eine bestimmte Szene oder ein Image oder einen Traum, wie du gern sein möchtest, erinnern?

Networking

people networking

Networking

Are you a good in-person-networker? As a freelancer, this is so important. And it`s not only because a strong network can open doors for us. But it`s about making use of the brain, ideas, and wisdom of many, not just our own.

By asking and listening we can find new ideas and broaden our understanding. We have a limited view on things, the world, everything – based on OUR experience. Other people bring in THEIR experiences and the resulting ideas and connections. So, this is gonna broaden our view and our opportunities big time.

Plus, being well connected feels like a safety net and will ultimately make us braver. There are people having our back and cheering us on.

Consider everybody

Our network is way bigger than we might think: Think of everyone you know – family, friends, and co-workers of course, but as well neighbours, people in your yoga class, people you meet on jobs, …  Then think of everyone these persons know, who you could be introduced to if needed. Consider everybody, not just seemingly “influential” people. Because everybody has something to teach. Plus, each person knows people that may turn out to be game-changers for you.

And then of course there`s the most basic and most important connection to God who can do crazy, unbelievable stuff and comes up with the best surprises – and who introduces us to those people that we need in our lives.

people in coffeeshop networking

To be honest, networking doesn`t exactly come naturally and easy to me. I`m a bit of a shy character and tend to be anxious that I might bother someone. But I`m learning. I`ve written the following list as kind of a reminder and instruction for myself. And perhaps this could be useful for you, too.

Here are some ideas, how to make the most of your network:

Be helpful whenever you can.

Ask if there`s something that you can do for people. Because the helping part of networking is the most fun. Don`t we all love it if we can be useful, make a difference to someone, and be able to help within our capabilities! It`s a happiness booster.

Be open and authentic.

Let other people in on your journey, don`t be superficial, and don`t try to pretend all is fine and dandy when it`s not.

Ask for what you need.

In order to do this, you would of course need to know what exactly you need first. So, maybe you need to find that out first. Perhaps it`s an idea concerning a certain issue or maybe it`s a connection to a certain business sector. Be specific to make it easy for the other person to help you. For example, ask: “Do you by chance know somebody who works in the pattern department of a fashion company?” The person might say: “Hm, actually I know someone who knows someone…” – and there we go.

Be open to suggestions.

When someone proposes something don`t say: “Well, BUT…” Take it in, consider and try it. Remember that they have experiences that you haven`t had and appreciate that they are willing to let you in on them. You never know, in hindsight this suggestion might be the one that helped you on the next step.

Listen and shut your cakehole.

Encourage the others to share their knowledge by truly listening. “You need to enter every conversation assuming that you have something to learn”, says Celeste Headlee in her TED-talk https://www.ted.com/talks/celeste_headlee_10_ways_to_have_a_better_conversation: “Everyone you will ever meet knows something that you don`t.” And: “I keep my mouth shut as often as I possibly can, I keep my mind open, and I`, always prepared to be amazed.”

Take notes.

Note each and every suggestion down in your notebook. Especially names and numbers. Otherwise, you`ll forget them or misplace them. Some might seem insignificant to you at the moment. But at a later point on your journey, after having gained more understanding and insight, you might find them super useful all of a sudden.

Don`t think you`re a burden.

Usually, people love to help with their expertise and connections. To most of us, it`s not a burden but a pleasure to be able to help. Barbara Sher writes in her book “Wishcraft” http://wishcraft.com/: “Most of us remember and treasure every part we’ve ever played in someone else’s survival, satisfaction, or success. …It’s because helping each other is creative and it makes us feel good.”

Give Feedback.

Let other people know about your experiences with their suggestions down the road.  Tell them about the phone call to that connection that they`ve given you. “It is a great way to show your interest and your respect for someone else’s opinion, it energizes your relationship, it shows someone: I`m listening to you, I pay attention to what you say, I value what you say,” says Gretchen Rubin on her podcast “Happier with Gretchen Rubin” https://gretchenrubin.com/podcast-episode/309-heed-a-suggestion-listeners-21-for-2021. Her sister Elizabeth Craft adds: “If you take on a suggestion, you`re giving someone else the pleasure of giving. It makes them feel good to know they gave you something valuable.” Plus, feedback creates accountability for you, because you don`t want to let those down, who cheer you on.  

What are your thoughts and experiences with networking? Are you a natural networker or does it demand some effort of you?

Networking

Bist du gut darin, dir ein persönliches Netzwerk zu bauen und zu nutzen? Für Freiberufler ist das so wichtig. Und nicht nur, weil uns ein starkes Netzwerk Türen öffnen kann. Sondern auch weil wir so die Köpfe, Ideen und Weisheit vieler nutzen können, nicht nur unsere eigenen.

Indem wir fragen und zuhören können wir an neue Ideen kommen und unsere Einsicht weiten. Wir haben alle einen eingeschränkten Blick auf Dinge, auf die Welt, auf alles – einen Blick, der auf UNSEREN Erfahrungen basiert. Andere bringen IHRE Erfahrungen ein und die daraus entstandenen Ideen und Verbindungen. Das wird unsere Einsicht und unsere Möglichkeiten erweitern.

Außerdem fühlt es sich ein gutes Netzwerk wie ein Sicherheitsnetz an, das uns mutiger macht. Da sind Leute, die hinter uns stehen und die uns anfeuern.

Denk an jeden

Unser Netzwerk ist viel größer als wir vielleicht denken: Denk an jeden, den du kennst – natürlich Familie, Freunde und Kollegen, aber auch Nachbarn, Leute in deinem Yoga-Kurs, Leute, die du auf Jobs triffst, … Dann denk an alle, die diese Leute kennen – und denen sie dich vorstellen könnten. Berücksichtige jeden, nicht nur solche, die dir “einflussreich” erscheinen. Denn von jedem kann man etwas lernen. Außerdem kennt jeder Leute, die unter Umständen einen großen Unterschied in unserem Leben machen könnten.

Und dann ist da natürlich die grundlegendste und wichtigste Beziehung zu Gott, der die verrücktesten und unglaublichsten Sachen möglich machen kann und die besten Überraschungen für uns bereithält. Und der uns den Leuten vorstellt, die wir in unserem Leben brauchen.  

mirror nice to meet you networking

Ehrlich gesagt, bin ich nicht gerade der geborene Networker, dem das leichtfällt. Ich bin eher der schüchterne Typ und befürchte, jemandem Last zu sein. Aber ja, ich lerne! Die folgende Liste habe ich mir als Erinnerung und Anleitung geschrieben. Vielleicht ist sie für dich auch nützlich.

Hier sind ein paar Ideen, wie wir unser Netzwerk gut nutzen können:

Hilf wann immer du kannst.

Frag, ob es etwas gibt, was du für jemanden tun kannst. Denn Helfen ist das, was am Netzwerken am meisten Spaß macht. Ist es nicht das beste Gefühl, wenn wir für jemanden einen Unterschied machen können und innerhalb unserer Möglichkeiten helfen können! Das ist ein Glücklichmacher.

Sei offen und authentisch.

Beziehe andere auf deinem Weg ein, sei nicht oberflächlich und versuche nicht vorzugeben, das alles super ist, wenn es nicht so ist.

Frag nach dem, was du brauchst.

Um das zu tun, müssen wir uns natürlich erstmal darüber im Klaren sein, was wir denn brauchen. Eventuell müssen wir uns das erstmal überlegen. Vielleicht ist es eine Idee zu einem Thema. Oder eine Verbindung zu einem bestimmten Geschäftsbereich. Sei möglichst präzise, denn das macht es dem anderen einfacher, dir zu helfen. Frag zum Beispiel: “Kennst du zufällig jemanden, der in der Schnittabteilung eines Modeunternehmens arbeitet?” Die Person könnte dann sagen: “Hm, tatsächlich kenne ich jemanden, der jemanden kennt…” – und schon gibt`s eine Spur.

Sei offen für Vorschläge.

Wenn jemand etwas vorschlägt, sag nicht “Ja, ABER…” Nimm den Vorschlag an, bedenke ihn und probier ihn aus. Denk daran, dass andere Erfahrungen haben, die du nicht hast. Und schätze, dass sie so nett sind, dich an ihren Erfahrungen teilhaben zu lassen. Wer weiß, im Nachhinein könnte gerade dieser Vorschlag der gewesen sein, der dir auf deinem nächsten Schritt geholfen hat.

Hör zu und lass den Mund zu.

Ermutige andere ihr Wissen mit dir zu teilen, indem du wirklich zuhörst. „Gehe in jede Unterhaltung mit der Annahme, dass du etwas lernen kannst”, sagt Celeste Headlee in ihrem TED-Talk https://www.ted.com/talks/celeste_headlee_10_ways_to_have_a_better_conversation: „Jeder, den du triffst, weiß etwas, das du nicht weißt.” Und: “Ich lasse meinen Mund zu so oft ich kann, ich bin aufgeschlossen und unvoreingenommen – und ich bin immer darauf vorbereitet, zu staunen.“

Mach dir Notizen.

Notiere dir jeden einzelnen Tipp in deinem Notizbuch. Vor allem Namen und Nummern. Sonst vergisst du sie oder verlegst sie. Manche Vorschläge kommen dir im Moment vielleicht unbedeutend vor. Aber später, wenn du mehr Einsichten gewonnen hast, könntest du sie auf einmal super nützlich finden.

Denk nicht, dass du eine Last bist.

Normalerweise freuen sich Leute, wenn sie mit ihrem Fachwissen und ihren Beziehungen helfen können. Für die meisten von uns ist es keine Last, sondern ein Vergnügen, wenn wir die Möglichkeit haben hilfreich zu sein. Barbara Sher schreibt in ihrem Buch “Wishcraft” http://wishcraft.com/: Die meisten von uns erinnern sich gern daran, wenn sie in irgendjemandes Leben eine Rolle spielten, die zu Erfolg geführt hat. … Deshalb, weil gegenseitiges Helfen eine kreative Handlung ist und wir uns dabei gut fühlen.“

Gib Rückmeldung.

Erzähl anderen von deinen Erfahrungen mit ihren Vorschlägen. Zum Beispiel von dem Telefonat mit der Person, die sie dir empfohlen haben anzurufen. Gretchen Rubin sagt in ihrem Podcast „Happier with Gretchen Rubin“ https://gretchenrubin.com/podcast-episode/309-heed-a-suggestion-listeners-21-for-2021: „Das ist eine tolle Möglichkeit, dem anderen dein Interesse und deine Anerkennung für seine Meinung zu zeigen. Es bringt eure Beziehung in Schwung und es zeigt jemandem: Ich höre dir zu, ich gebe acht und schätze was zu sagst.“ Ihre Schwester Elizabeth Craft ergänzt: “Wenn du einen Vorschlag aufgreifst, dann gibst du dem anderen das Vergnügen des Gebens. Der andere fühlt sich gut, weil er weiß, dass er dir etwas Wertvolles geben konnte.“ Außerdem schafft ein Feedback Verbindlichkeit und du wirst deine Sache eher verfolgen. Weil du die Leute, die dich anfeuern, nicht enttäuschen möchtest.

Was sind deine Gedanken und Erfahrungen mit Netzwerken? Bist du ganz mühelos am Vernetzen oder kostet es dich manchmal Überwindung?

three birds networking

Read more:

Success-Stories https://nadinewilmanns.com/success-stories

Courage and Massive Action https://nadinewilmanns.com/massive-action

Changes ahead

changes ahaid fashion after corona hairstyle with scrunchie

Changes ahead

I wonder whether after this crisis there will be a change in fashion. Whether in 30 years’ time, the books about the history of fashion will report that in “the twenties” of this decade there were some fundamental changes of some sort due to the COVID crisis.

Like in the twenties of the last decade, after World War I. Women went from wearing tight corsets to dancing in loosely fitted, short, sleeveless dresses. Because they wanted to feel free and light. Or in the fifties, after World War II, when Christian Dior introduced the New Look. A look, emphasizing the womans` hourglass figure, a tiny waist. Women wanted to feel ladylike and like the perfect housewife.

It`s just fun

Fashion used to react to crises and political changes. Because people long for change after a period of difficulties. So let`s see if there is going to be another fashion revolution after this current crisis, too. Maybe we `re heading into the aera of the pyjama style. Wide comfy trousers with matching sweaters. I would be in for it.

That`s what I like about fashion: It`s “just” fashion, it`s always fun, whatever the change. As long as we shop mindfully, ideally second-hand, and not from brands that exploit their workers and the environment of course.

Currently, I love my home office-look: baggy pullovers, sports-pants, tucked into think socks, and scrunchie in the hair.  What are you wearing lately, and what trend would you like to see coming?

Neues vor uns

Mal schauen, ob es nach dieser Krise einen Wandel in der Mode gibt. Ob die Bücher über Modegeschichte in 30 Jahren berichten werden, dass es „in den Zwanzigern“ dieses Jahrhunderts wegen der COVID-Krise eine Moderevolution gab.

Wie in den Zwanzigern des letzten Jahrhunderts, nach dem ersten Weltkrieg. Frauen haben statt enger Korsetts lieber in weit geschnittenen, kurzen, ärmellosen Kleidern getanzt. Denn sie wollten sich frei und leicht fühlen. Oder in den Fünfzigern, nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg, als Christian Dior den New Look einführte. Ein Look, der die Sanduhr-Figur der Frau, eine schmale Taille, betonte. Frauen wollten sich damenhaft fühlen und wie die perfekte Hausfrau.

Nur Spaß

Mode hat immer auf Krisen und politische Veränderungen reagiert. Weil Leute nach schwierigen Zeiten Lust auf was anderes haben. Also mal schauen, ob es nach dieser aktuellen Krise wieder eine Moderevolution gibt. Vielleicht gehen wir in eine Ära des Pyjama-Styles. Weite, bequeme Hosen mit passenden Sweatshirts. Ich wäre dabei!  

Das mag ich an der Mode so sehr: Es ist “nur” Mode, sie macht immer Spaß, egal wie sie sich ändert. Solange wir bewusst einkaufen natürlich, also am besten second-hand und nicht von Marken, die ihre Arbeiter und die Umwelt ausbeuten.

Gerade mag ich meinen Homeoffice-Look: Weite Pullis, Sporthosen, in dicke Socken gestopft, und Scrunchie im Haar.  Was trägst du so in letzter Zeit und welchen Trend würdest du gerne sehen?

Courage and Massive Action

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking a step - courage and massive action

Courage and Massive Action

A few years back, I couldn`t imagine a time when nobody would ask me about my age anymore when buying cigarettes. Well, I guess, this time has now come. It reminds me though: If I want to reach the dreams that I have concerning my life, I need to take massive action NOW. Throw in all the risk. And pray and hope boldly, expecting the best. I don`t have time to hesitate because I wanna avoid rejection, awkward moments, and failure. I better learn to deal with them, because they are on the route to any goal after all. Otherwise, I will miss my chance to walk the route with crazy and great experiences that God has designed for me, and I would regret this for sure.  

A life true to myself

Talking about rejection and regrets: there is a book called “The Top 5 Regrets of the dying”. A nurse who cared for dying patients in their last weeks has written it. Turns out the number 1 regret of her patients was: “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.”

On another sidenote relating to the massive action: The other day, I`ve listened to a conversation of celebrity photographer Dan Kennedy with entertainment photographer Conor McDonnell. Conor McDonnell started out as a teenager wanting to get into concerts for free. After his first chance to photograph a concert, he wanted to do more.

Massive Action

“I would email everyone and anyone who was playing in Liverpool, I would check the upcoming listings, I would send probably a hundred emails a day, getting two replies. One would be ‘no’, the other one ‘maybe- we`ll think about it’”, he says. “So, to whoever said ‘maybe’, I would keep emailing them: ‘I would really, really love to do this, please can I come to do it.’ And eventually, I started building a portfolio of all the bands playing in Liverpool and bigger bands would come, too, which would help, and then I kind of started building it up from there.”

Naive courage

After time things got easier: “I was at the same venues a lot of the time five nights out of the week.” This way he made the right connections, and later he would be photographing tours of Ellie Goulding, James Morrison, and be the personal photographer of Calvin Harris. None of this would have happened, if he hadn`t fought through the initial time of naïve courage and confident learning – he learned photography on the job – and being super persistent. He didn`t let himself get discouraged but kept pressing on boldly and determined until more and more doors opened up for him.

What do you want to achieve and what massive action would you have to take? Are you hesitating to walk the path to your goals, because you try to avoid the inevitable encounters with failure and rejection on the way? Do you hope for and expect the best for you to happen?

Mut und "Massive Action"

Noch vor ein paar Jahren konnte ich mir keine Zeit vorstellen, in der mich niemand mehr nach meinem Alter fragen würde, wenn ich Zigaretten kaufen will. Tja, mir scheint, es ist soweit. Das erinnert mich daran: Wenn ich die Träume, die ich für mein Leben habe, noch erreichen will, dann muss ich JETZT viel tun – „massive action“. Alles Risiko reinwerfen. Und mutig beten und hoffen – und das Beste erwarten. Ich habe keine Zeit, noch länger zu zögern, nur um Ablehnung, unangenehme Momente und Misserfolge zu vermeiden. Sie liegen nun mal auf dem Weg zu jedem Ziel. Lerne ich also besser, gut mit ihnen klarzukommen. Sonst verpasse ich meine Chance, den Weg zu verrückten, unglaublichen Erlebnissen zu gehen, den Gott sich für mich ausgedacht hat. Das würde ich auf jeden Fall bereuen.  

Ein Leben, das mir entspricht

Stichwort Ablehnung und Bereuen: Es gibt ein Buch „5 Dinge, die Sterbende am meisten bereuen“. Eine Krankenschwester, die sterbende Patienten in ihren letzten Wochen betreut hat, hat es geschrieben. Bedauern Nummer eins ist: “Ich wünschte, ich hätte den Mut gehabt ein Leben zu leben, das mir entspricht, und nicht das Leben, das andere von mir erwartet haben.“

Und noch was zur “massive Action“: Neulich habe ich ein Interview von Star-Fotograf Dan Kennedy mit Entertainment-Fotograf Conor McDonnell angehört. Conor McDonnell begann als Teenager, der umsonst Konzerte besuchen wollte. Nach seiner ersten Chance, ein Konzert zu fotografieren, wollte er mehr davon.

"Massive Action"

„Ich emailte jedem, der in Liverpool spielte, ich checkte Listen mit angekündigten Konzerten, ich schickte gut 100 Emails am Tag raus – um zwei Antworten zu bekommen. Eine war ‘Nein’, die andere ‘Vielleicht, wir überlegen es uns’”, erzählt er. „Also habe ich denen, die mit ‘vielleicht’ antworteten, weiter gemailt: ‘Ich würde so gerne bei euch fotografieren, bitte lasst mich’. Und schließlich begann ich, mir ein Portfolio aufzubauen mit all den Bands, die in Liverpool gespielt haben. Größere Bands kamen dazu, was half, und von da aus habe ich meine Karriere weiter aufgebaut.“

Naiver Mut ist gefragt

Nach einer Zeit wurde es einfacher: “Ich war oft an fünf Abenden der Woche in den gleichen Veranstaltungshallen.“ So kam er zu guten Beziehungen und später fotografierte er die Touren von Ellie Golding, James Morrison und wurde persönlicher Fotograf von Calvin Harris. Nichts dergleichen wäre passiert, wenn er sich nicht durch die Anfangszeit durchgebissen hätte. Mit naivem Mut und Zuversicht – denn er hat bei den Jobs gelernt, gut zu fotografieren – und Hartnäckigkeit. Er hat sich nicht entmutigen lassen, sondern hat entschlossen weiter gemacht, bis mehr und mehr Türen für ihn aufgegangen sind.

Was würdest du gerne erreichen und welche vielen Aktionen müsstest du dafür starten? Zögerst du, weil du die unvermeidlichen Begegnungen mit Misserfolgen und Ablehnung auf dem Weg vermeiden möchtest? Hoffst und erwartest du, dass das Beste für dich passieren wird?

Creative work

creative work leica analog photo camera

Creative Work

How to get creative work done

One of the biggest traps for creative work is postponing. Either because of “waiting for inspiration”. Or because of perfectionism, saying “I`m not good enough yet, conditions are not ideal at the moment,…”

I`ve written about this before but it`s been one of the most important lessons for me: Creativity means commitment which implies planning your day, setting priorities, and setting aside time for them. Creative work means fight and determination. And actually doing the work now.

“Inspiration is for amateurs. The rest of us just show up and get to work”, said photographer Chuck Close. “If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself.”

No need for the perfect setting

The other day, I had an interesting interview with singer and musician Joe Vox. He has released an album together with other musicians called “COVid IDentities”. Because of the lockdown, one of the musicians didn`t have access to fancy recording technology. So he just used his phone. Simple as that.

The musicians made things work, even though conditions weren`t ideal. Joe Vox said: “As a creative, you don`t need the perfect setting. On the contrary: Too much perfection can indeed harm because you constantly find that settings aren`t ideal. And you end up doing nothing at all because of that. You can always do something when you are creative and really want to.”

Kreative Arbeit

Eine der größten Fallen für kreative Arbeit ist Aufschieberitis. Entweder weil man auf “Inspiration” wartet. Oder wegen Perfektionismus, der einem sagt “Ich bin noch nicht gut genug, die Bedingungen sind im Moment noch nicht ideal,…“

Ich habe schon mal über dieses Thema geschrieben, aber es ist eine der wichtigsten Lektionen für mich gewesen: Kreativität bedeutet Einsatz und sich zu verpflichten, Prioritäten zu setzen und dafür Zeit zu reservieren. Also den Tag entsprechend drum herum zu planen. Es bedeutet auch zu kämpfen und entschlossen zu sein. Und sich tatsächlich jetzt an die Arbeit zu machen.

„Inspiration ist was für Amateure. Wir anderen lassen uns blicken und machen uns an die Arbeit“, sagte Fotograf Chuck Close. „Wenn du darauf wartest, dass sich die Wolken auftun und dich ein Geistesblitz trifft, dann wirst du nicht besonders viel zustande bringen. All die besten Ideen kommen aus dem Prozess heraus. Sie entstehen bei der Arbeit selbst.”

Es braucht nicht die perfekten Bedingungen

Neulich hatte ich ein interessantes Interview mit Sänger und Musiker Joe Vox. Er hat ein Album “COVid Identities” mit anderen Musikern zusammen herausgebracht. Wegen des Lockdowns hatte einer der Musiker keinen Zugang zu richtiger Aufnahmetechnik. Also hat er sein Handy benutzt. Ganz einfach.

Die Musiker haben die CD möglich gemacht, auch wenn nicht alles ideal war.  Joe Vox sagte: “ Als Kreativer braucht man nicht die perfekten Bedingungen. Im Gegenteil: Zu viel Perfektion tut oft nicht gut, denn man findet dauernd, dass die Umstände nicht gut genug sind. Und am Ende kommt gar nichts bei raus. Man kann immer was machen, wenn man Kreativität hat und wirklich will.“

Trust the next step

self-assignments coffeeshop table Trust the next step

Trust the next step

Often, I think: “Man, why don`t I seem to be able to figure out some genius plan for my career?” However, thinking about it, it seems smarter to me to just take and engage in one step at a time. To trust the next step and trust that God knows what I don’t, and that he`s still gonna make a lot of things possible for me. Instead of spending time and energy trying to figure out the great, right plan. Because really, ten years ago I wouldn’t have imagined that I would work as a freelance photographer. And twenty years ago, I wouldn’t have even dared to dream that I would cycle across London to spend my morning writing in a coffee shop in Shoreditch.

Do the work

Who knows what incredible things are in store for us yet! By trying to figure out the future I probably won`t get as far as I would by actually doing the work. Engaging in the very next step, taking one step at a time. By one photoshoot, one blog post, one challenge, one experience at a time, we`re moving forward – seemingly slow but in fact faster – into new wonders and surprises.

Dem nächsten Schritt vertrauen

“Mensch, warum fällt mir nur kein genialer Plan für meine Karriere ein?”, denke ich manchmal. Wenn ich aber genau darüber nachdenke, finde ich es klüger, einfach einen Fuß vor den anderen zu setzen und mich auf den Schritt, den ich gerade mache, zu konzentrieren. Und darauf zu vertrauen, dass Gott schon wissen wird, was ich nicht weiß und dass er noch viel für mich möglich machen wird. Anstatt Zeit und Energie zu investieren, um den großen, richtigen Plan für mich herauszufinden. Weil ehrlich, vor zehn Jahren hätte ich nie gedacht, dass ich mal als freiberufliche Fotografin arbeiten würde. Und vor zwanzig Jahren hätte ich mir nicht träumen lassen, dass ich mal mit dem Fahrrad durch London fahren und meinen Morgen in einem Café in Shoreditch mit Schreiben verbringen würde.

An die Arbeit machen

Wer weiß, was für unglaubliche Dinge noch auf uns warten! Wenn ich versuche, auf die große Zukunftsidee zu kommen, wird mich das wahrscheinlich nicht so weit bringen, wie wenn ich mich einfach an die Arbeit mache. Also meinen nächsten Schritt mache und dann den nächsten, einer nach dem anderen. Mit einem Fotoshooting, einem Blogpost, einer Herausforderung, einer Erfahrung nach der anderen, geht es weiter – scheinbar langsam aber tatsächlich schneller – zu neuen Wundern und Überraschungen.   

Dream big

self-assignment sky and sun. Dream big

How big dreams add fun to your work

Would you like to release a crazy amount of joy and fun in your work? I might just have the secret for you. Well, it certainly works for me at the moment. So here`s the trick: Dream big and set yourself a ridiculously far-fetched goal that really excites you. Mine is to photograph the Queen.

You may laugh and hey, so do I – and that`s what does the trick: There is no pressure whatsoever and no expectations. Noone seriously expects me to accomplish that. For someone like me, who crumbles under pressure and when feeling expecting eyes on me, this is so liberating.

Far-fetched, but not entirely impossible

However, while the goal should be something quite far-fetched, it shouldn`t be entirely impossible. Like you know, turning into a unicorn. Or becoming a piano superstar when you have no feeling for rhythm or something like that.

A photo shooting with the Queen, however, is possible: I`m here on this earth with my camera and so is the Queen.  So it`s just about working out a strategy and taking steps that eventually bring us together, which of course includes becoming better and better as a photographer. I`ve given myself a random time frame of two years to achieve my goal. And I`ve thought – just in case it shouldn`t work out with the Queen –  I would be equally cool with photographing Prince Charles as an alternative instead.

We are going to win either way

I used to take my work so seriously and while I still kind of do, there is now much more lightness and play in my approach. It feels more like a fun game, where you can win, but it wouldn`t be the end of the world if you don`t. In fact, I will win either way: Because, while I do want to reach my goal, I know that it`s even more about the journey. 

The journey towards this achievement will just benefit me so much, both as a person and as a photographer. “Who would you have to become on your way to trying to achieve that goal? … It would be a wild and incredible journey”, says Kara Loewentheil in her podcast “Unfuck your brain” about “impossible goals” (I recommend listening to this by the way: https://unfuckyourbrain.com/setting-impossible-goal-2021/). Just imagine: How would you develop on the way to achieving this goal?

A new perspective

With my goal in mind, everything falls into a more convenient perspective: When I go on photo jobs now, I see them more as helpful little steppingstones and opportunities to learn on my long journey to photograph the Queen – and not as THE ultimate test that will proof whether I`m a good photographer or not. Failing becomes more like a valuable experience that helps me to achieve my goal.

And whatever happens – whether my boss likes some pictures of mine or not, whether I get a certain assignment or not, … – nothing of that can ever take away my dream. But it`s my decision only, not anybody else’s. And I finally really understood the quote by Arthur O`Shaughnessy:

We are the music-makers, and we are the dreamer of dreams.”

Wie große Träume für mehr Spaß bei der Arbeit sorgen

Würdest du gerne eine völlig verrückte Menge Freude und Spaß an deiner Arbeit freisetzen? Kann sein, dass ich den richtigen Tipp für dich habe. Also für mich funktioniert er zumindest im Moment ausgezeichnet. Also hier ist der Trick: Träume wirklich groß und setze dir ein lächerlich weitgegriffenes Ziel, auf das du dich wirklich freust. Meins ist, die Queen zu fotografieren.

Kann sein, dass du jetzt lachst und hey, ich lache auch – aber das ist genau der Trick: Es gibt keinen Druck und keine Erwartungen. Keiner denkt ernsthaft, dass ich das schaffen müsste. Für jemanden wie mich, die unter Druck und Erwartungshaltung wie gelähmt ist und dann gar nicht gut arbeiten kann, ist das so befreiend.

Weit gegriffen, aber nicht völlig unmöglich

Allerdings muss das Ziel zwar groß sein, aber nicht völlig unmöglich. Also es sollte nicht sowas sein, wie „ich will mich in ein Einhorn verwandeln“. Oder „ich will ein Piano-Superstar werden“, wenn man null Gefühl für Rhythmus hat.

Ein Fotoshooting mit der Queen zu machen, ist dagegen theoretisch möglich: Ich bin auf dieser Erde mit meiner Kamera, und sie auch. Also geht es nur darum, eine Strategie zu erarbeiten und Schritte zu gehen, die uns am Ende zusammenbringen. Das bedeutet natürlich auch, immer besser als Fotografin zu werden. Ich habe mir selbst einfach mal ein Zeitfenster von zwei Jahren gesetzt, um mein Ziel zu erreichen. Und ich habe mir auch überlegt, dass – falls es mit der Queen aus irgendeinem Grund nicht klappen sollte – Prince Charles eine gleichwertige Alternative wäre.

Wir gewinnen so oder so

Ich habe meine Arbeit immer sehr ernst genommen. Zwar nehme ich sie irgendwie immer noch ernst, aber da ist jetzt viel mehr Leichtigkeit und Spiel in meiner Herangehensweise. Es fühlt sich mehr wie Spaß und Spiel an, bei dem man gewinnen kann. Aber es würde auch nicht die Welt untergehen, wenn ich nicht gewinnen würde. Tatsächlich werde ich so oder so gewinnen: Denn zwar will ich mein Ziel wirklich erreichen, aber trotzdem weiß ich, dass es mehr um die Reise dahin geht.

Der Weg zu meinem Ziel wird mir so viel bringen, als Person und als Fotografin. “Welch eine Persönlichkeit müsstest du werden, bei dem Versuch, dieses Ziel zu erreichen? … Es würde eine wilde und unglaubliche Reise werden”, sagt Kara Loewentheil in ihrem Podcast „Unfuck your Brain“ über „unmögliche Ziele“. (Empfehle übrigens, das anzuhören: https://unfuckyourbrain.com/setting-impossible-goal-2021/) Stell dir nur mal vor: Wie würdest du dich entwickeln, wenn du dich tatsächlich auf den Weg zu deinem Ziel machen würdest?

Eine neue Perspektive

Seit ich mein Ziel im Kopf habe, fällt gerade alles in eine angenehmere Perspektive: Wenn ich auf Fotojobs gehe, habe ich nicht mehr so sehr das Gefühl, auf die Probe gestellt zu sein, als ob ein Fotojob beweisen würde, ob ich eine gute Fotografin bin oder nicht. Ich sehe alle meine Jobs eher als hilfreiche kleine Meilensteine und als Chancen, auf meiner langen Reise zur Queen dazuzulernen. Misserfolg wird eher zu einer wertvollen Erfahrung, die mir dabei hilft, mein Ziel zu erreichen.

Und was auch immer passiert – ob mein Chef irgendwelche Bilder von mir mag oder nicht, ob ich einen bestimmten Auftrag bekomme oder nicht, und so weiter – nichts kann mir je meinen Traum wegnehmen. Es ist allein meine Entscheidung, nicht die von irgendjemand anderem. Und ich habe endlich wirklich das Zitat von Arthur O`Shaughnessy verstanden:

“Wir sind die Musikmacher und wir sind die Träumer der Träume”.


Read more:

http://www.nadinewilmanns.com/success-stories

http://www.nadinewilmanns.com/work-for-joy

Copycat Creativity Technique

Copycat

The Copycat Technique

for Creativity

Copying, as “bad” as it may sound, is actually a very good technique to get creative. The best designers use it. While the process may start with a plain copy, it ends with something very own and unique. Because you`ll add your own input and vision into the development, you`ll take the copy to a higher level, creating something with your own voice and style.

When I was still a fashion design student, I worked for Giles Deacon in London for a while. Still naïve and thinking ideas come right out of thin air or pure imagination, I was shocked: In the design studio, we were given pictures out of fashion magazines and were told to copy and rework certain items. I thought: Is he for real?? Is he just copying other people’s work and making out it`s his own idea?

Be a copycat to fly

In the years after, I have learned that it is common for designers to begin with a copy. But then, what starts as a copy is transforming into a completely own design. While copying you come up with new ideas, you bring in your own style, you amend details to match your own vision. The final result might not even resemble the “original” anymore. (And really: they most likely aren`t originals anyway, because they themselves are copied and transformed from another “original” at some point). Call it inspiration if you like.

The same goes for photography, writing, drawing, all arts for that matter: The copy is like the push or the run-up before you fly on your own.

Die Copycat-Technik

für Kreativität

Kopieren, so “schlecht” es klingt, ist tatsächlich eine sehr gute Technik, um kreativ zu sein. Die besten Designer machen das. Der Prozess beginnt zwar mit einer Kopie, aber er endet mit etwas Eigenem und Einzigartigem. Weil du deinen eigenen Input und deine Vision in die Entwicklung mit reingibst, bringst du die Kopie auf ein höheres Level und machst am Ende etwas in deinem ganz eigenen Stil.

Als Modestudentin habe ich eine Zeitlang bei Giles Deacon in London gearbeitet. Ganz naiv dachte ich, Ideen kommen einfach so aus dem Nichts und purer Fantasie. Als man uns Fotos aus Magazinen gab, um einzelne Sachen davon nachzuarbeiten, also zu kopieren, war ich schockiert. Ich dachte: Soll das ein Witz sein?? Kopiert er einfach die Arbeit anderer und tut dann so, als wär`s seine eigene Idee?

Kopieren um zu fliegen

In den folgenden Jahren habe ich gelernt, dass es ganz normal für einen Designer ist, zu kopieren. Aber dann verwandelt sich das, was als Kopie beginnt, in ein ganz eigenes Design. Während des Kopierens kommst du auf neue Ideen, du bringst deinen Stil ein, du änderst Sachen ab und passt sie deiner eigenen Vorstellung an. Das Endergebnis sieht dann dem „Original“ oft nicht mal mehr ähnlich. (Und ein Original war das wahrscheinlich sowieso nicht, denn auch dieses „Original“ wurde irgendwann von etwas anderem kopiert und weiterentwickelt.) Man kann das auch Inspiration nennen, wenn man so will.

Das Gleiche gilt fürs Fotografieren, Schreiben, Malen und Kunst überhaupt: Die Kopie ist wie ein Schubs oder ein Anlauf bevor du selbst fliegst.

copycat

Read more: How to be creative

Success Stories

Photography black and white selfie for blog about success

Stories we tell about ourselves

How do we define success? And are we giving it our own definition, or do we let others define it for us? What story do we tell about ourselves? And are we dreaming big or do we let others limit our dreams, and what we dare to expect?

There are so many opinions and voices that can restrict us and that don`t serve us at all. For example: “Successful people are those who make a lot of money or who have fame.” If we have neither money nor fame, we might fall into the trap of thinking that we are not successful. But wait for a second: Is this definition matching our own standards of success at all?

And what kind of story do we tell about ourselves in general?

After the past two weeks, I could be telling, that I have failed a lot and that I`m unsuccessful. But honestly what would be the point of a story like this? It would not only be depressing; it also would not serve me at all.

We have one life, so why not tell a good story about it! So, instead I say: “I have taken some bold steps lately. At the same time, I`ve gained a good deal of experience with criticism both fair and unfair, even some unfriendliness. Either way, I`ve learned a lot. Most of all, I haven`t let anything cause me to abandon my dreams and I keep dreaming big. I expect great opportunities and adventures coming my way because I trust God to have a good plan for me.”

Selfie with dog

A friend of mine said to me that her co-worker has warned her: “In our job, we have to be very flexible.” There are so many ideas and opinions about how we SHOULD be. But especially as creatives I think we don`t have to accept the boundaries of common opinions. If we work to our own heart’s content, not for the judgment of others, we work with the heart of an artist. And we can accomplish a lot and more, if we just never lose faith, tell our story favourably, and define success in a way that sustains us and doesn`t discourage us.

Stories, die wir über uns erzählen

Was ist Erfolg? Legen wir für uns selbst fest, was Erfolg für uns bedeutet, oder lassen wir uns das von anderen vorgeben? Was für eine Geschichte erzählen wir von uns? Und haben wir große Träume, oder lassen wir uns von anderen Grenzen setzen, in dem was wir uns zutrauen?

Es gibt so viele Meinungen und Stimmen, die uns einschränken können und die uns überhaupt nicht nützlich sind. Zum Beispiel: „Erfolgreiche Leute verdienen viel Geld und sind angesehen und bekannt.“ Wenn wir aber weder Geld haben noch besonders anerkannt sind? Dann könnten wir in die Falle tappen zu denken wir seien nicht erfolgreich. Aber warte mal: Passt diese Art von „Erfolg“ denn überhaupt zu unseren eigenen Maßstäben?

Und was für eine Geschichte erzählen wir überhaupt von uns?

Nach den letzten beiden Wochen könnte ich erzählen, dass ich oft gescheitert bin und dass ich keinen Erfolg habe. Aber ehrlich, was würde denn so eine Geschichte bringen? Es wäre nicht nur eine deprimierende Geschichte, sie würde mir auch nichts nützen.

Wir haben ein Leben, also warum sollten wir nicht gute Geschichten davon erzählen! Also sage ich stattdessen: „Ich habe in letzter Zeit ziemlich viel gewagt. Gleichzeitig habe ich Erfahrungen mit Kritik – fairer und unfairer Kritik – und sogar Unfreundlichkeiten gesammelt. So oder so habe ich viel gelernt. Vor allem habe ich mich nicht daran hindern lassen, weiterhin große Träume zu haben. Ich erwarte tolle Gelegenheiten und Abenteuer, weil ich darauf vertraue, dass Gott einen guten Plan für mich hat.“

selfie with dog in flash light

Eine Freundin sagte mir neulich, dass ihre Kollegin sie ermahnt hat:  “In unserem Job müssen wir besonders flexibel sein.“ Es gibt so viele Vorstellungen davon, wie wir sein SOLLTEN. Aber vor allem als Kreative brauchen wir uns doch nicht mit den Grenzen gewöhnlicher Meinungen abfinden. Wenn wir zu unserer eigenen Freude arbeiten und nicht für das Urteil anderer, dann arbeiten wir mit dem Herz eines Künstlers. Und wir können viel und noch mehr erreichen, wenn wir nie aufhören zu glauben, unsere Geschichte vorteilhaft erzählen und Erfolg so definieren, dass es uns nicht entmutigt sondern stärkt.

How to learn from mistakes

notebook notes about mistakes to learn

Create a personal notebook of learned lessons

Create a personal notebook of learned lessons

Isn`t it that our own mistakes are our best teachers? Yet, I still dread to make mistakes. And on top of that, I often feel like I haven`t learned at all, thinking: ‘Oh no, I should know by now – why have I made this mistake AGAIN?’

Therefore, I have now started collecting my photography mistakes in a notebook. But actually, no – and here`s the trick: It`s more like I`m collecting learning lessons, solutions, or advice. After each photo shoot, I review everything. From the planning to the photoshoot itself, to post-processing and communication with people in the process. I then think about how I can improve. Basically, I`m giving myself advice. Or I`m asking fellow photographers or talk to other people to hear their advice. And then I note this down. Together with the date and the name of the photoshoot so I can remember the precise situation. 

Collecting lessons

I wouldn’t write down the “negative” like: “Shouldn`t have stayed in that bad light when photographing that person.” But I would note down the solution: “When the light isn`t good, I can ask for two minutes to myself to look for better options.” This way, I`m turning mistakes straight into learning. And by noting it down it`s more likely to stay with me. Plus, I can scroll through the pages before a photoshoot to remind myself of relevant things to consider.

Another side effect of these notes: I´m not so terribly scared of making mistakes anymore. Because I can effectively turn them into learnt lessons in my notebook – in fact, I`m now collecting them. Not that I would make mistakes on purpose, of course. But when they happen, I now can finally see them more as opportunities for learning. This as well makes it easier to get over these mistakes quickly, and not giving myself a hard time for having made them. Because I feel I`m actively doing something to improve.

Faith

Someone once told me a story about a teacher of people who are to be trained to sell stuff. (I think I have shared this story before, but it really fits here, so here it is again). This teacher sends his students out for a competition: They all should knock on people’s doors to sell stuff. The one who collects the most rejections in one week is the winner.

I found this story really encouraging: We don`t need to run from rejection – and not from mistakes either. Instead, we can say: ‘Oh, I can learn something here.’ And: ‘I am on the way of making progress.’ Rejection as well as mistakes are part of the job (and part of life really). The braver we are, the more we try with faith instead of fear, the more we experience, and the more we learn and grow.

Mach dir ein Notizbuch mit Lektionen

Mach dir ein Notizbuch mit Lektionen

Sind nicht unsere eigenen Fehler unsere besten Lehrer? Trotzdem graut es mir immer ein bisschen davor, Fehler zu machen. Und außerdem habe ich oft das Gefühl gar nichts gelernt zu haben und denke: ‚Oh nein, ich sollte das doch inzwischen besser wissen – warum hab ich diesen Fehler nun schon wieder gemacht?‘

Deswegen habe ich jetzt damit begonnen, meine Fotografie- Fehler in einem Notizbuch zu sammeln. Also nein, eigentlich sammle ich nicht meine Fehler – und hier ist der Trick: Ich sammle eher Lösungen oder Ratschläge an mich selbst. Nach jedem Fotoshooting gehe ich alles nochmal durch: Von der Planung, über das Fotoshooting selbst, zur Nachbearbeitung und der Kommunikation mit denen, die beteiligt waren. Und ich überlege, wie ich was besser machen kann. Ich berate mich also selbst. Oder ich frage befreundete Fotografen oder rede mit anderen, um deren Rat zu hören. Und dann schreibe ich das auf, zusammen mit dem Datum und Namen des Fotoshootings, damit mir eine konkrete Situation dazu im Kopf bleibt. 

Lektionen sammeln

Ich schreibe nicht das “Negative” auf, also  beispielsweise nicht: “Ich hätte mit der Person, die ich fotografiert habe, nicht in diesem schlechten Licht bleiben sollen.“ Sondern ich notiere mir eine Lösung: „Wenn es nur schlechtes Licht gibt, kann ich um 2 Minuten Zeit für mich fragen, um mich nach besseren Optionen umzuschauen.” So werden Fehler direkt in Ratschlägen und Lernerfahrungen umgewandelt. Dadurch, dass ich das aufschreibe, kann ich es mir besser merken. Und ich kann vor einem Fotoshooting nochmal durch die Notizen blättern, um mich an Dinge zu erinnern, die ich beachten muss.

Noch ein Effekt ist: Ich habe nicht mehr so sehr Angst davor, Fehler zu machen. Weil ich sie in effektive Lektionen in meinem Notizbuch verwandeln kann – ich sammle sie sogar. Natürlich mache ich nicht absichtlich Fehler. Aber wenn sie passieren, kann ich sie endlich als Gelegenheiten zum Lernen sehen. Das macht es gleichzeitig einfacher, schnell über diese Fehler hinwegzukommen. Und mir selbst nicht das Leben mit Selbstkritik schwer zu machen. Immerhin habe ich das Gefühl, dass ich aktiv etwas mache, um besser zu werden.

Vertrauen

Es gibt eine Geschichte von einem Lehrer mit Studenten, die lernen sollen Dinge zu verkaufen.  (Ich hab sie glaub ich schon mal in einem Post erzählt, aber sie passt hier so gut, dass ich sie nochmal erzähle). Dieser Lehrer schickt alle seine Schüler in einen Wettbewerb: Alle sollen bei irgendwelchen Leuten an deren Türen klopfen und ihnen etwas verkaufen. Derjenige, der die meisten Absagen bekommt, ist der Gewinner.

Mich hat diese Geschichte total motiviert. Wir brauchen  vor Ablehnung nicht wegzurennen – und auch nicht von unseren Fehlern. Stattdessen können wir sagen: ‘Ah, da kann ich was lernen.’  Ablehnung genauso wie Fehler sind Teil des Jobs (und des Lebens). Je mutiger wir sind, je mehr wir mit Offenheit und Vertrauen statt mir Angst ausprobieren und versuchen, desto mehr Erfahrungen können wir sammeln und desto mehr können wir lernen und besser werden.

notebook to learn from mistakes and dog

Creativity

Selfie with dog. Creativity

Notes about creativity after a not overly creative, busy day

Creativity needs some prayers and letting go. It needs fresh air and downtime. Chats with friends, some laughing out loud and being childish. Truly tasting and enjoying a piece of cake, a milky coffee with whipped cream on top, or something we love. Some moving around helps, too – be it doing a dance, going for a walk, or just cleaning or tidying up. Going out. Observing. Screen-free time. Reading. Daydreaming. A hot shower. Time. It certainly needs the Sunday off to wind down and relax – or any day once a week for that matter.

Furthermore, creativity needs patience, forgiving self-care, and softness. We need to be “on our side” and “for us” no matter what`s going on. What can we do here at this very moment for ourselves? On the other hand, I don`t think that creativity minds a push, effort, and discipline though. And it does need commitment, resilience, habit, and the occasional fight.

Feeling heartbreak, hardship, and suffering in just the right kind of dosage are just brilliant for being creative. By the right kind of dosage, I mean as much, as it doesn`t paralyze us.

Defining success according to our own standards.

Personally, I find creativity dies with comparison, judgment, inner pressure, and trying to please people. But it grows with the idea of abundance and that there`s space for everyone. When I`m open and without judgment towards others, I can be more creative myself. 

When too busy there`s no room for creativity because it needs its space to unfold. Sometimes it needs saying: “Stop, that`s enough, I`m gonna go on thinking about this tomorrow, but for now I need a break.” It, too, needs saying: “Thanks God for what I`ve achieved already, and I trust that you`ll give me a good idea when I need it.”

Notizen zum Kreativsein nach einem mittelmäßig kreativen, sehr geschäftigen Tag

Kreativität braucht Gebete und loslassen. Sie braucht frische Luft und Auszeit. Mit Freunden reden, laut lachen, kindisch sein. Mit richtig viel Genuss ein Stück Kuchen essen oder einen Milchkaffee mit Sahne obendrauf trinken oder eben etwas was wir lieben. Bewegung hilft auch – sei es tanzen, spazieren gehen oder auch einfach putzen und aufräumen. Rausgehen. Beobachten. Zeit ohne Bildschirm. Lesen. Tagträumen. Eine heiße Dusche. Zeit. Kreativität braucht auf jeden Fall Sonntags Freiheit, zum runterkommen und entspannen – oder an sonst einem Tag in der Woche.

Sie braucht Geduld, sich selber vergeben und sich gut um sich selbst kümmern. Wir müssen „auf unserer Seite“ und „für uns“ sein, was auch immer gerade los ist. Was können wir hier gerade eben für uns tun? Andererseits denke ich nicht, dass ein Schubs, Mühe und Disziplin der Kreativität schaden. Und sie braucht auf jeden Fall Verbindlichkeit, Ausdauer, Gewohnheit und ab und zu Kampf.

Herzschmerz, Schwierigkeiten und Leiden in der richtigen Dosierung sind perfekt, um kreativ zu sein. Mit der richtigen Dosis meine ich so viel, dass es uns nicht lähmt.

Erfolg entsprechend unsrer eigenen Maßstäbe definieren

Persönlich finde ich, dass Kreativität durch Vergleiche, Werturteile, inneren Druck und “Anderen-gefallen-wollen” stirbt. Aber sie wächst mit der Idee, dass es Überfluss gibt und Platz für jeden. Wenn ich offen bin und andere nicht beurteile und bewerte, kann ich selbst kreativer sein. 

Zu viel zu tun zu haben, nimmt der Kreativität den Raum, weil sie Platz zum Entfalten braucht.

Manchmal müssen wir sagen: „Stop, das reicht jetzt, ich mache mir da morgen weiter Gedanken, aber jetzt brauche ich erstmal Pause.“ Und auch: „Danke Gott, was ich schon erreicht habe, und ich verlasse mich darauf, dass du mir eine gute Idee gibst, wenn ich eine brauche.“

creativity selfie with dog

Read more: 

Criticism: Five thoughts

shadow picture How to deal with criticism

Photograph your successes (and other thoughts about dealing with criticism)

Today I had to face harsh and personal criticism. And while I knew I shouldn`t “take it personally”, I didn`t know what that really means let alone how to do it. So, I`ve let this offence drain a lot of my energy – really, I felt like just having played Wimbledon (and lost) by the end of the day. Do you know that feeling? So, while I`m clearly not an expert in dealing with criticism, I`ve thought about some ideas about this, that might be helpful to share. Because when we get better at dealing with criticism not only will we preserve our energy, but we won`t dread offence so much and won`t let it hold us back from becoming braver as a professional and as a person.

It`s more about the criticizer

Anyway, back to the story: Lucky enough I had a coaching session scheduled tonight (www.ichinencoaching.com) so this was brilliant timing to discuss the issue. And I think I finally can make use of this “Don`t take it personally”: It often has nothing to do with us as a person, when being criticized, but in fact with the person who is criticizing. “Hurting people hurt people”, says Joyce Meyer. Equally one could say: People who feel attacked attack others. While talking about the situation I understood why the person who offended me did so. That doesn`t make the attack less mean but we are likely to not feel so angry about it knowing why the person offended us. So, I think it`s helpful to calmly analyze the situation that we have been criticized about to see why the other person has said what she has said.

Take notice of successful moments

Secondly, I can obviously recommend talking to somebody (but not ranting) who doesn’t judge. Who reminds us that if the criticism was justified we can work on ourselves. And that either way we have a lot of successes and achievements, too.

Talking about achievements: It`s helpful to really take notice of achievements as they happen. So that we can remember them in these kinds of situations. Only yesterday I`ve received best grade for my final work for my journalism degree and I hardly acknowledged it (not half as much as I took notice of this criticism today). So, I think taking a picture of these successful moments (big or small) or just writing a note in my planner might be a useful habit.

I wish I had said...

Another thing I struggled with, was to find the “right words” in the moment of attack. It was only afterwards that I came up with the phrases that I wished I had said. However, it helps to nevertheless say those phrases out loud afterwards – just for ourselves then. Because having practised, we will eventually find an appropriate peaceful response in a “real” situation, one that also honours what we think.

Oh, and not to forget: I think a good first aid after having been attacked is to be a good friend to ourselves. Which means that we don`t hurry on with the day but slow down a bit and maybe sip a coffee or tea, slip into soft clothes, say a little prayer and allow for a little downtime. Of course, it would be brilliant to be a superwoman with the perfect mindset who never gets upset but just moves on with her day. But hey, then again, taking things to heart also means that we have a heart, no?

Fotografiere deine Erfolge (und mehr zum Umgang mit Kritik)

Heute hat mich jemand ziemlich hart und persönlich kritisiert. Zwar wusste ich, dass ich das „nicht persönlich nehmen“ soll, aber mir war nicht klar, was das genau bedeutet und schon gar nicht wie das geht. Also habe ich mir von dieser Sache viel Energie rauben lassen – ehrlich, ich hab mich heute Abend gefühlt, als hätte ich Wimbledon gespielt (und verloren). Kennst du das Gefühl? Wie du siehst bin ich nicht gerade ein Experte darin, mit Angriffen umzugehen. Aber ich dachte, ich schreibe ein paar Ideen darüber auf, die uns in Zukunft helfen könnten. Denn wenn wir besser mit Kritik umgehen können, dann können wir nicht nur unsere Energie sparen, sondern wir fürchten uns nicht mehr so sehr davor, angegriffen zu werden und dadurch werden wir mutiger im Job und überhaupt als Mensch.

Es geht eher um den, der Kritik übt

Jedenfalls zurück zur Story: Glücklicherweise hatte ich heute Abend eine Coaching Stunde, das war also super Timing um die Sache zu besprechen. Und ich denke, ich kann jetzt mit diesem „Nimm`s nicht persönlich“ was anfangen: Es hat oft überhaupt nichts mit uns als Person zu tun, wenn uns jemand kritisiert, sondern mit der Person, die die Kritik äußert. „Verletze Menschen verletzen Menschen“, sagt Joyce Meyer. Genauso könnte man sagen: Leute, die sich angegriffen fühlen, greifen andere an. Als ich über die Situation, wegen der die Person mich angegriffen hat, gesprochen habe, habe ich verstanden, warum sie das gemacht hat. Das macht den Angriff nicht weniger gemein, aber wir sind doch nicht mehr so sauer, wenn wir verstehen, warum uns jemand angreift. Also ich denke, es ist hilfreich, die Situation ruhig zu untersuchen wegen der wir kritisiert wurden, um zu sehen, warum die andere Person uns angegriffen hat. 

Halte Erfolgsmomente fest

Außerdem kann ich natürlich sehr empfehlen, die Sache mit jemandem zu besprechen (ohne zu schimpfen oder zu lästern), der nicht urteilt. Der uns daran erinnert, dass wir an dem arbeiten können, für das wir zu Recht kritisiert worden sind. Und dass wir – so oder so – auch schon viele Erfolge hatten.

Apropos Erfolge: Mir ist mal wieder klar geworden, wie hilfreich es ist, wirklich Notiz von Erfolgsmomenten und Lob zu nehmen, um sich dann in schwierigen Situationen daran zu erinnern. Gerade gestern habe ich eine Eins für meine Abschlussarbeit für mein Journalismus-Studium bekommen und ich habe es gar nicht gebührend gefeiert. Tatsächlich habe ich dem nicht mal halb so viel Beachtung geschenkt, wie dieser Kritik heute. Also ich denke, es ist eine gute Gewohnheit von Erfolgsmomenten (auch den Kleineren) ein Foto zu machen oder zumindest eine Notiz im Terminkalender.

Ich wünschte, ich hätte ... gesagt.

Noch eine Sache, die ich schwierig fand, war die “richtigen Worte” zu finden als die Frau mir all ihre Anschuldigungen entgegenwarf. Erst später sind mir die Sätze eingefallen, die ich hätte sagen wollen. Allerdings ist es hilfreich, diese Sätze trotzdem – dann einfach danach und nur für mich selbst – zu sagen. Denn wenn wir das üben, finden wir irgendwann auch friedliche passende Antworten in der”echten” Situation, eine die auch das was wir selbst denken wertschätzt.

Oh, und nicht zu vergessen: Ich denke eine gute Erste Hilfe nach Kritik ist es, uns selbst ein guter Freund zu sein. Das heißt, dass wir nicht einfach weiterhetzen, sondern ein bisschen langsam machen, vielleicht einen Kaffee oder Tee schlürfen, in weiche Wohlfühlkleidung schlüpfen, ein kleines Gebet losschicken und uns eine Mini-Auszeit gönnen. Klar wäre es toll, Superwoman zu sein, die das perfekte Mindset hat und die sich nie angegriffen fühlt, sondern einfach mit ihrem Tag weitermacht. Aber hey, wenn wir uns Dinge zu Herzen nehmen, dann heißt das doch eigentlich vor allem, dass wir ein Herz haben, oder?

How to win time

mirror selfie How to win time

How to win time (with “positive procrastination”)

Do you sometimes feel like you don`t have time because you`ve got so much to do? Maybe you are (like me) a “last-minute-person” who tends to procrastinate. I`ve learned that this behaviour is a huge time robber.  

This week, I needed to hand in an important article. I had had six weeks to get it done, yet I started writing only four days before my deadline and handed it in right on the final day. Sounds familiar?

Instead of just getting something done when we originally plan to do it, we keep postponing it until it is not possible to postpone it any longer. The result is not only stress, but we also feel like the task is taking us much longer than it really does. I felt like my article has taken me six weeks, even though I effectively worked on it for four days.

Procrastinating work is spending time working

That`s because while postponing we still have the task on our mind. We aren`t really relaxed, but we think “Aww shit, I still need to do this sometime soon!” Spending time procrastinating something is like spending time working on it – just without achievement. In my case I “worked” on my article for six weeks, instead of the four days I`ve spent writing it.

If I had done it when I originally had planned it to do, it would have seemed like a simple four-day job, not a six weeks project. Plus, I would have felt like an “achiever”, thinking: “this could have taken me six weeks, but I managed in four days”. And I would have felt like being very time effective.

Writing the article wouldn`t have been much of a hassle – if I hadn`t made a hassle out of it by dragging it. Plus, I could have gotten a free confidence-boost and a good experience of accomplishment.

How to win time Mirror selfie

Commit to your schedule

While I kind of liked to be a last-minute-person at school or at university, I now find it very unhealthy for my nerves. We have more time to relax when we don`t spend it on procrastinating. Now I`m not saying to do everything straight away always – sometimes this isn`t even possible because we need to wait for missing information or simply a free space in our calendar (and we do need plenty of time for relaxing and enjoying after all). But the idea is to schedule tasks and to then do them at the time they are scheduled for – and not postpone them unless there`s a major reason to do so.

Time Manager Dave Crenshaw calls this “positive procrastination”. Instead of adding a task on our “To-Do-List” to do it “sometime soon”, we make an appointment for it in our calendar. And then, here`s the key: “Once it`s scheduled into your calendar, you have to commit to it.”

Doing so, we win time which we then can use to enjoying ourselves while being truly relaxed.  

Wie man Zeit gewinnt (mit “positivem Aufschieben”)

Hast du manchmal das Gefühl, zu hast keine Zeit, weil du zu viel zu tun hast? Vielleicht bist du (wie ich) ein “Auf-den-letzten-Drücker“-Typ, der Dinge gerne aufschiebt. Ich habe gelernt, dass das ein riesen Zeiträuber ist.

Diese Woche musste ich einen wichtigen Artikel einreichen. Ich hatte sechs Wochen Zeit zum Schreiben, aber ich habe erst vier Tage vor meiner Deadline begonnen. Am letzten möglichen Tag habe ich den Text eingereicht.

Anstatt Aufgaben einfach dann zu machen, wenn wir sie eingeplant haben, schieben wir sie auf die lange Bank, bis das irgendwann nicht mehr möglich ist. Das Ergebnis ist nicht nur Stress, sondern wir haben auch das Gefühl, viel länger an der Sache gearbeitet zu haben als das in Wirklichkeit der Fall ist. Mir ist es so vorgekommen, als hätte ich für meinen Artikel sechs Wochen gebraucht, dabei habe ich effektiv ja nur vier Tage lang daran gearbeitet.

Arbeit aufschieben heißt Zeit mit Arbeit zu verbringen

Das ist deshalb so, weil wir die Aufgabe beim Aufschieben ja immer noch in unserem Kopf haben. Wir sind nicht wirklich entspannt, sondern wir denken „Oh shit, ich muss das dringend bald machen.“ Zeit damit verbringen, eine Aufgabe aufzuschieben, fühlt sich an, als ob man gerade an ihr arbeiten würde – nur, dass man nichts dabei erreicht. In meinem Fall habe ich sechs Wochen an meinem Artikel „gearbeitet“, anstatt die vier Tage, die ich daran geschrieben habe.

Hätte ich ihn geschrieben, als ich es ursprünglich mal eingeplant habe, hätte es sich wie ein Job von vier Tagen angefühlt, nicht wie ein Sechs-Wochen-Projekt. Außerdem hätte ich mich wie ein “Erfolgstyp” gefühlt und gedacht: Das hätte sechs Wochen brauchen können, aber ich hab`s in vier Tagen hinbekommen. Und ich wäre mir sehr effizient vorgekommen.

Es wäre überhaupt keine große Sache gewesen, den Artikel zu schreiben – hätte ich keine große Sache daraus gemacht, in dem ich sie vor mir hergeschoben habe und sie dadurch immer größer geworden ist. Und ich hätte ganz umsonst einen Selbstvertrauens-Schub bekommen können, noch dazu eine gute Erfahrung.

how to win time - mirror selfie

Lege dich auf einen Zeitplan fest

Während der Schul- oder Uni-Zeit mochte ich es noch ganz gern, ein “Last-minute-Typ” zu sein, inzwischen finde ich es sehr ungesund für meine Nerven. Wir haben mehr Zeit, um entspannt zu sein, wenn wir sie nicht mit Aufschieberitis verbringen.

Ich sage jetzt nicht, dass wir immer alles gleich machen sollten – manchmal ist das ja auch gar nicht möglich, weil wir noch auf fehlende Infos warten müssen, oder auch einfach auf einen freien Platz in unserem Kalender. (Und wir brauchen schließlich viel Zeit zum Entspannen und Genießen).

Die Idee ist die: Wir planen Aufgaben ein und machen sie dann zu der Zeit, zu der sie eingeplant sind – und verschieben sie nicht, es sei denn es gibt einen wichtigen Grund.

Zeit-Manager Dave Crenshaw nennt das “Positive Aufschieberitis“. Anstatt eine Aufgabe auf unsere „To-Do-Liste“ zu schreiben, um sie „irgendwann bald mal“ zu machen, sollten wir für die Aufgabe einen Termin in unserem Kalender ausmachen. Und dann kommt das Wichtigste: „Sobald es in unserem Kalender eingeplant ist, müssen wir uns daran halten.“

Machen wir das, gewinnen wir Zeit, die wir dann – wirklich entspannt – mit Genießen verbringen können.

Read more about Freelance life in this post: Time and progress

Work for joy

work for joy dog behind ladder

How to work for joy

Is your job something that you would have as a hobby, too?

A few weeks ago, I had an interesting interview with Linda Stark, a singer who is as well a songwriter for other artists. I had noticed that she kept her website for her project as a singer called “LiLA” separate from the one as a contract songwriter. So, I wondered, whether she purposefully distinguishes between the two. Yes, she said: “LiLA is what I do entirely for my own joy.” For LiLA she doesn`t care about all the rules that she would follow when writing songs for someone else. “This music speaks from my heart and it suits me”, she told me. “And if I can`t think of something to write for half a year, then be it. LiLA is my baby and one of my top standards is: no pressure.”

Entirely for my own joy

I found that super interesting: The same activity – songwriting. For others – then it`s “work”, for oneself – then it`s “joy”. Don`t get me wrong: she didn`t say or mean, that she doesn`t find writing for others joyful! But her “LiLA” project is ENTIRELY for her joy. Which means, without any external pressure or requirements. Only she needs to like it. If it`s well-received, that`s brilliant, but if not, it`s nice anyway.

In this respect, the saying “Do what you love, and you will never have to work again” can`t always be readily applied. I have often thought: What is wrong with me – why do I still perceive work as “work”, EVEN THOUGH I do what I love. But it isn`t so easy as the saying makes out to be – at least that`s how I feel. The same activity can be perceived as work when I have to perform for a business, maybe with a difficult boss or with difficult morals. Or as joy when I do it for myself.

Dog. How to work for joy

Freedom and play

When I was employed as a pattern cutter in London, I would do patterns for my own project after work until late at night. That didn`t bother me at all – quite the contrary: I was already looking forward to it on my way home. It would not have crossed my mind to keep on working after 6 o`clock if it would have been work for my boss. The same activity – but entirely different joy levels.

I did enjoy going to work, but rather because of my fun co-workers than because of the work itself. Yet for my project, I was full of ideas and energy. There was freedom and play in my “work”. I wouldn`t really care very much about whether I could earn a lot or a little. Or whether a lot of people or only a few would like my stuff.

Nothing has to, everything can

What I have noticed though: It`s much easier to think that way, when having a money-making second source of income. If nothing HAS TO, but everything CAN. That means, being entirely independent of external opinions and financial success. That doesn`t mean that there will never be difficulties or frustration, anxiety, or disappointment. But that the joy will outweigh all that so that I won`t take so much notice of this other stuff. And so that these unpleasant feelings won`t “nest“ in me.

For me, this blog is a little joy-project. And I always want to photograph „for my own joy”. If I should notice that this is changing, I hope that I will pull the plug and stop doing assignments for a while. My joy in doing photography is just way too important for me to lose it over it being a job. And sooner or later, I want to revive my fashion project – and take good care that I will do it “entirely for my own joy”.

Für Freude arbeiten

Ist das was du beruflich machst, auch das, was du privat gerne machst?

Vor einigen Wochen hatte ich ein interessantes Interview mit Linda Stark, einer Sängerin, die auch Lieder für andere Künstler schreibt. Mir war aufgefallen, dass sie für ihr Soloprojekt „Lila“ eine andere Webseite hat als für ihre Arbeit als Auftrags-Liedermacherin. Ob sie beides so streng voneinander abgrenze, habe ich gefragt. Das hat sie ganz entschlossen bejaht: „Lila ist das, was ich wirklich ganz zu meiner eigenen Freude mache.“ Da seien ihr die Regeln egal, die beachten müsste, würde sie für einen Auftraggeber ein Lied schreiben. Es sei Musik, die einfach aus ihrem Gefühl spreche und die zu ihr passe. „Und wenn mir mal ein halbes Jahr kein Text einfällt, dann schreibe ich eben keinen. LiLA ist mein Baby und eine meiner ersten Prämissen ist, mir kein Druck zu machen.“

Zu meiner eigenen Freude

Das fand ich interessant: Die gleiche Tätigkeit – Songwriting. Einmal für andere – da ist es „Arbeit“ -und einmal für sich selbst – da ist es „Freude“. Jetzt darf man mich hier nicht falsch verstehen: Sie hat nicht gesagt oder gemeint, dass ihr das Lieder schreiben für andere keine Freude macht! Aber ihr LiLA-Projekt macht sie eben GANZ zu ihrer Freude. Das heißt völlig ohne Druck und Vorgaben von außen. Nur ihr muss es gefallen. Wenn`s gut ankommt, gut, wenn nicht, ist`s trotzdem schön.

Und insofern ist der Spruch „Tu was du liebst, und du musst nie wieder arbeiten“ nicht so ohne weiteres umzusetzen. Ich habe oft gedacht: Was stimmt denn nicht mit mir – warum kommt mir meine Arbeit wie Arbeit vor, OBWOHL ich doch mache, was ich gern mag. Ganz so einfach, wie der Spruch es sagt, ist es aber eben nicht – zumindest geht es mir so. Die gleiche Tätigkeit, kann ich als Arbeit empfinden, wenn ich sie beispielsweise für einen Betrieb mache, vielleicht noch mit anstrengendem Chef oder schwierigen Moralvorstellungen im Betrieb. Oder ich kann sie als Freude wahrnehmen, wenn ich sie für mich mache.

Dog paws and shoes. How to work for joy

Freiheit und Spiel

Als ich in London als Modellmacherin angestellt war, habe ich nach Feierabend oft bis nachts über Schnitten für mein eigenes Projekt gesessen. Es hat mir überhaupt nichts ausgemacht, noch so lange da dran zu sitzen – im Gegenteil: ich hab mich schon auf dem Weg nach Hause darauf gefreut. Das wäre mir nicht eingefallen, wenn es sich um Arbeit für meinen Chef gehandelt hätte. Die gleiche Tätigkeit – aber völlig andere Freudenlevels.

Zwar bin ich wirklich gern zur Arbeit gegangen, aber eher wegen meiner netten Kollegen, als wegen der Arbeit an sich. Für mein Projekt dagegen war ich voller Ideen und vor allem voller Energie. Da war viel Freiheit und Spiel drin. Es wäre mir auch einigermaßen egal gewesen, ob ich damit viel oder wenig Geld verdient hätte. Oder, ob meine Sachen vielen oder wenigen Leuten gefallen hätten.  

Nichts muss, alles kann

Was ich festgestellt habe: Es geht viel leichter, so zu denken,  wenn man noch ein anderes, geldverdienendes Standbein hat. Wenn nichts MUSS, alles nur KANN. Das heißt, dass ich wirklich völlig unabhängig bin von der Meinung anderer oder vom finanziellen Erfolg. Das heißt nicht, dass es nie Schwierigkeiten, Frust, Angst oder Enttäuschung gibt. Aber dass die Freude an meinem Projekt so sehr überwiegt, dass ich die unangenehmen Dinge gar nicht so sehr wahrnehme und die sich gar nicht lange in mir breit machen können.

Für mich ist dieser Blog ein kleines Freuden-Projekt. Und ich will auch immer „zu meiner Freude“ fotografieren. Wenn ich merken sollte, dass sich das mal ändert, hoffe ich, dass ich da ganz schnell die Reißleine ziehe und nur noch Prints verkaufe, keine Aufträge mehr mache. Dafür ist mir meine Freude am Fotografieren einfach viel zu wichtig. Und über kurz oder lang will ich auch mein Mode-Projekt wieder reaktivieren – und gut aufpassen, dass ich es „ganz zu meiner eigenen Freude“ mache.

Read more about freelancer life in “To enjoy”.

The Happiness Factor (in Photography)

fashion storytelling Your story Happiness Factor Fashion Photography McWilmanns Nadine Wilmanns

The Happiness Factor

Today I have been thinking about something I have heard a while ago. The opening question is: How come people like some pictures and then there are other pictures that they don`t like? And I mean regardless of the quality of the photograph.

So here is what I`ve heard in an Instagram webinar by photographer Katelyn James: If people are having a good time while they are being photographed, they are much more likely to love the pictures later. And if the pictures are technically brilliant and everyone is looking great, but the people didn`t FEEL great while being photographed, they are most likely not going to like the pictures.

Makes sense because memories and pictures are very much linked. And when looking at a picture we almost always feel something. Either how we felt in that situation when the picture was taken, or how we would feel in that situation (if the picture is of someone else).

Long story short: The photographers’ task is of course to take good pictures, but it`s equally important to make everyone feel good, pretty, welcome, happy, relaxed and funny. 

I was thinking about this on my way home from a little photo session today. We all have laughed a lot, because everyone was so cheerful. So I left with a good feeling thinking: there should be some likeable photos because of the fun involved. 

PS: The photos in this article are from a different – but equally fun – job. 

fashion storytelling Happiness Factor people on bench for fashion photo

Heute habe ich über etwas nachgedacht, das ich vor einigen Wochen gehört habe. Die Ausgangsfrage ist: Warum mögen Leute manche Bilder gern und manche gar nicht gern? Und ich meine ganz unabhängig von der Qualität der Aufnahme.

Also Folgendes habe ich in einem Instagram Webinar von Fotografin  Katelyn James gehört: Wenn Leute eine gute Zeit haben, während sie fotografiert werden, werden sie die Bilder später eher mögen. Und wenn die Bilder zwar technisch super sind und alle darauf toll aussehen, sich aber nicht toll FÜHLEN, während sie fotografiert werden, dann werden sie die Bilder höchstwahrscheinlich nicht so sehr mögen.

Macht Sinn für mich, denn Erinnerungen und Bilder sind nun mal sehr miteinander verbunden. Und wenn wir ein Bild anschauen, dann fühlen wir so gut wie immer irgendetwas. Entweder, wie wir uns in der Situation gefühlt haben, als das Foto gemacht wurde. Oder wie wir uns in der Situation fühlen würden (wenn nicht wir selbst auf dem Foto sind).

Langer Rede kurzer Sinn: Die Aufgabe des Fotografen ist es natürlich gute Bilder zu machen (wobei gut ja einigermaßen subjektiv ist). Aber es ist genauso wichtig, jeden gut, hübsch, willkommen, zufrieden, entspannt und witzig fühlen zu lassen.  

An das habe ich gedacht, als ich heute auf dem Rückweg von einer kleiner Fotosession war. Wir haben alle viel gelacht, weil alle so gute Laune hatten. Also bin ich mit einem guten Gefühl gegangen und habe gedacht: Da sollten auf jeden Fall ein paar Fotos dabei sein, die gut ankommen, weil so viel Spaß involviert war.

PS: Die Fotos für diesen Artikel sind von einem anderen – aber auch sehr lustigen – Job.

X Fashion and Lifestyle Photography Portfolio Nadine Wilmanns

For contact information regarding potential assignments click HERE.

The full picture

the full picture fashionblog fast fashion stripes

On British TV, Channel 4 is airing a “documentary” about Missguided, a fast-fashion giant based in Manchester that produces cheap, low-quality garments. Channel 4 is not really documenting though. Instead, they`re staging a glamorous glittering fashion world and hiding the fact that Missguided is contributing to the exploitation of low-paid workers and pollution by poor choice of materials. They`re not showing the full picture at all.

A comment on the Channel4 Instagram post says:  “My friend was working for Missguided when this was being filmed and everything was totally set up!” While I`m not surprised about this, I am still disappointed that a major TV station is willing to spread lies without giving the full picture, and promoting such a bad example of the fashion industry in such an uninvestigative way. 

On the good side

Earlier this year I had to proofread a PR article for a magazine about a car company claiming that it`s super-sustainable because of its electric car range. However, electric cars are not sustainable AT ALL. (see for example: https://psuvanguard.com/electric-cars-arent-really-green/ ). Luckily, I could compromise with my boss, that we would at least neutralize the article: Saying they`re doing electric cars (which they do) but not claiming this to be sustainable. Not ideal, of course, but still something.

Isn`t it that we usually want to do something good with our lives, fight the good fight, be on the good side. And especially as a journalist, but generally as a person, you want to keep some integrity. I do wonder: Channel 4 has money and they are choosers – so why don`t they support for example sustainable fashion, instead of promoting Missguided of all brands?

The change in the little for the full picture

If we work for companies with unethical business manners, we can find ourselves kind of contributing to something that in fact we don`t want to support at all. Let`s keep on believing the best though and let`s try to be the change in every little tiny decision that is up to us. So that, when looking at the full picture, there is some good stuff to see, too.  

Ganz im Bild

Im Englischen Fernsehen wird auf Channel4 gerade eine “Dokumentation” über Missguided gezeigt. Missguided ist ein großes Modeunternehmen im Fast-Fashion Sektor, der Billig-Kleidung produziert.  Channel 4 dokumentiert allerdings nicht wirklich. Stattdessen führen sie eine glamouröse, Bling-Bling-Modewelt vor und verschweigen, dass Missguided unterbezahlte Produktions-Arbeiter ausbeutet und zur Umweltverschmutzung beiträgt, weil es Billigmaterialien verwendet. Channel 4 zeigt da nicht das Gesamtbild.

Ein Kommentar auf den Channel4 Instagram Post zur “Doku” sagt: “Meine Freundin hat während den Dreharbeiten für Missguided gearbeitet und alles war total gespielt und arrangiert.“ Zwar bin ich davon nicht überrascht, aber ich bin doch enttäuscht, dass ein großer Fernsehsender bereit dazu ist, Lügen zu verbreiten, ohne das Gesamtbild zu zeigen. Und, dass sie solch ein schlechtes Beispiel der Modeindustrie bewerben, ohne das zu hinterfragen. 

Auf der guten Seite

Anfang des Jahres sollte ich einen PR-Artikel für ein Magazin Korrektur lesen. Der Artikel war über eine Autofirma, die behauptet wegen ihrer Elektroautos besonders nachhaltig zu sein. Aber Elektroautos sind überhaupt nicht nachhaltig (siehe zum Beispiel: https://psuvanguard.com/electric-cars-arent-really-green/ ). Zum Glück konnte ich mit meinem Chef einen Kompromiss finden, dass wir den Artikel zumindest neutral umschreiben: Sagen, dass die Firma Elektroautos verkauft aber nicht behaupten, dass das nachhaltig ist. Natürlich nicht ideal, aber immerhin was.

Wollen wir normalerweise etwas Gutes mit unserem Leben machen wollen, uns für gute Sachen einsetzen wollen und einfach auf der guten Seite stehen wollen? Und vor allem als Journalist, aber auch als Person, will man doch zu dem stehen können, was man schreibt und sagt. I frage mich: Channel 4 hat doch Geld und können sich`s doch aussuchen, was sie unterstützen möchten – warum also nicht zum Beispiel nachhaltige Modemarken, anstatt ausgerechnet Missguided.

Kleine Veränderung im Gesamtbild

Wenn wir für Firmen arbeiten, die unmoralisch arbeiten, finden wir uns in der Situation wieder, dass wir zu etwas beitragen, das wir eigentlich überhaupt nicht unterstützen wollen. Ich hoffe, dass wir trotzdem weiter an das Beste glauben können  und dass wir versuchen, in jeder kleinen Entscheidung , bei der wir die Wahl haben, die kleine Veränderung zum Besseren zu sein. Damit, wenn man das Gesamtbild anschaut, auch etwas Gutes zu sehen ist.  

 

men painting wall the full picture

Time and progress

time and progress fashion memories watch and wristlet

Time and Progress

Time is a tricky thing. It`s my birthday this weekend, reminding me of how fast time goes by. I feel like I cannot keep up at all. On the other hand, time brings some good stuff like progress, growth, and knowledge.

"If your goal is the time itself..."

However, I sometimes struggle to see my progress and I often don`t give myself credit for it. Or I become impatient. In this context I`m reminded about something that I’ ve heard in a conversation with street photographer Brandon Stanton (Humans of NY) on the podcast “Magic Lessons with Elisabeth Gilbert”.  He said that many goals depend on stuff we can`t control, for example, whether people like our work or not. “But if your goal is the time itself, just the time, then it becomes much simpler and more achievable. Because it depends on one thing: How you spend your time.”

Focus on the time

Success then isn`t the result, but the time spent with the work. Brandon Stanton suggests not to focus on a result like ‘I want to be a successful photojournalist’ or ‘I want to be a bestselling author’. We shouldn`t take a goal that is out of our control as a benchmark for success.

Instead, he advises to rather focus on the time we spend on the way. For example: “I spend one hour every morning to write”, or: “I take some time photographing every day.”

A gentle approach to success

As someone who struggles with competitive situations and who is easily intimidated by expectations or having to achieve things, I love this. It seems like a sustainable and somewhat gentle approach to success.

I still don`t know how to feel ok about aging. But I know what I can do meanwhile: valuing time I spend on things, rather than being anxious about the result. And have faith that there will be some good progress eventually and that God will take care of the outcome.

Zeit und Wachsen

Zeit ist eine schwierige Angelegenheit. Dieses Wochenende ist mein Geburtstag und erinnert mich daran, wie schnell die Zeit vergeht. Ich habe das Gefühl, dass ich überhaupt nicht mithalten kann. Andererseits bringt Zeit auch gute Sachen, wie Entwicklung, Wachstum und Wissen.

"Wenn dein Ziel die Zeit selbst ist..."

Allerdings fällt es mir oft schwer, meine Fortschritte zu sehen und anzuerkennen. Oder ich werde ungeduldig. In dem Zusammenhang fällt mir etwas ein, das ich in einem Gespräch mit Fotograf Brandon Stanton (Humans of NY) im Podcast “Magic Lessons with Elisabeth Gilbert” gehört habe.

Er sagt, dass viele Ziele von Dingen abhängig sind, die nicht in unserer Hand sind. Zum Beispiel ob Leute unsere Arbeit mögen oder nicht. „Aber wenn die Zeit selbst das Ziel ist, nur die Zeit, dann wird alles viel einfacher und machbarer. Denn der Erfolg hängt dann von einer Sache ab: Wie ich meine Zeit verbringe.“

Erfolgsfaktor Zeit

Erfolg ist dann nicht das Endergebnis, sondern Zeit mit der Arbeit selbst verbracht zu haben.

Brandon Stanton schlägt vor, sich nicht so sehr auf ein Endziel (wie ‚Ich will ein erfolgreicher Fotojournalist sein‘, oder: ‚Ich will einen Bestseller schreiben.‘) zu konzentrieren.

Statt Erfolg an einem Ziel messen, das wir nicht kontrollieren können, rät er, uns lieber auf die Zeit und den Weg dahin zu konzentrieren. Zum Beispiel ‚Ich will jeden morgen eine Stunde schreiben‘ , oder: ‚Ich nehme mir jeden Tag Zeit zum Fotografieren.‘

Eine nachhaltige Einstellung zum Erfolg

Als jemand, der Konkurrenzsituationen nicht mag und der sich leicht von Erwartungen und Erfolgsdenken einschüchtern lässt, mag ich diese Herangehensweise. Es scheint mir eine nachhaltige und irgendwie sanfte Einstellung zum Erfolg zu sein.

Ich weiß immer noch nicht, wie man mit dem Altern gut klarkommt. Aber ich weiß, was ich inzwischen tun kann: Die Zeit zu schätzen, die ich mit Dingen verbringen, anstatt mich mit Gedanken über das Ergebnis zu stressen. Und darauf vertrauen, dass ich Fortschritte mache und Gott den Rest schon für mich machen wird.

How to catch the moment

How to catch the moment Documentary photography Nadine Wilmanns

Overthinking is very inconvenient in photography, especially photojournalism. Life is changing in seconds. If you think instead of just pressing the shutter, you will usually miss the “decisive moment”.

I often catch myself thinking “Shall I take a picture?” or “Will somebody mind?” or “What will people think?” I really want to challenge myself to not do that any more. Instead I want to replace hesitating with the reflex to just focus and press the shutter. Thinking and hesitating are just not useful in these situations.

“Every time my finger wants to press the trigger, I don`t question it.

I just do it.”

In one of my favourite documentaries about photographer Koci Hendandez, he says: “When I have a camera in my hands, my head and my heart are connecting in a way that says ‘press that button’ – and I do.” And: “We all have the inclination when we have a camera to take a picture, and all I did was learn not to resist that. Every time my finger wants to press the trigger for whatever reason, I don`t question it. I just do it.”

He says that with so much energy and determination – it`s contagious. Go for it, be brave, question later, do not miss a moment. Especially as we`re shooting digital now 99 per cent of the time, so everything can be deleted anyway.

Shoot first, ask questions later

I’ m a big hesitater as a photographer as well as generally in life – which has made me miss a lot of opportunities and experiences. So, I urgently want to work on that and practice overriding the hesitation- and-overthinking-reflex with a new trust-your-instinct-and-go-for-it-reflex. As a photographer but as well in other areas of life.

Street Photographer Steve Simon says: “I shoot first, I ask questions later.” And: “If you take time to think, you`ll miss the shot. So you`ve just got to trust your instincts and shoot and hope for the best.”  Will the shot turn out great? The thing is: you won`t know until you try.

Den Moment einfangen

Zu viel nachdenken ist ungünstig in der Fotografie, vor allem im Fotojournalismus. Das Leben verändert sich im Sekundenschritt. Wenn du nachdenkst, anstatt einfach den Auslöser zu drücken, dann verpasst du meist den „entscheidenden Augenblick“.  

Ich ertappe mich oft dabei, wie ich denke „Soll ich das fotografieren?“, „Stört es jemanden?“ oder „Was könnten die Leute denken?“. Ich will es mir wirklich zur Aufgabe machen, das nicht mehr zu machen. Stattdessen will ich dieses Zögern durch den Reflex ersetzen, einfach zu fokussieren und abzudrücken. Nachdenken und Zögern sind einfach nicht praktisch in diesen Situationen.

“Jedes Mal, wenn mein Finger den Auslöser drücken will, frage ich nicht.

Ich mach‘ es.”

In einer meiner Lieblingsdokus über Fotograf Koci Hernandez sagt er: „Wenn ich eine Kamera in meinen Händen halte, dann verbinden sich mein Kopf und mein Herz auf eine Weise, dass sie beide sagen „Drück den Knopf“ – und ich mach‘ es.“ Und: „Wir alle haben den Impuls, ein Bild zu machen, wenn wir eine Kamera haben und alles was ich gemacht habe, ist zu lernen, dem nicht entgegenzustehen. Jedes Mal, wenn mein Finger den Auslöser drücken will – warum auch immer – frage ich nicht. Ich mach‘ es.“

Er sagt das mit so viel Energie und Überzeugung – es ist ansteckend. Mach‘ es einfach, sei mutig, frage später, verpasse keinen Moment. Zumal wir zu 99 Prozent sowieso digital fotografieren und alles wieder gelöscht werden kann.

Mach’ erst das Foto, frag später

Ich bin ein großer Zögerer, als Fotograf und überhaupt im Leben. Dadurch habe ich viele Chancen und Erfahrungen verpasst. Also will ich dringend üben, den „Zöger- und -Nachdenk- Reflex“ mit einem neuen „Vertrau- deinem- Instinkt- und – mach- es-Reflex“ zu „überschreiben“. Als Fotograf und auch in anderen Bereichen im Leben.

Fotograf Steve Simon sagt: „Ich schieße erst das Foto und stelle Fragen später.“ Und: „Wenn du dir Zeit nimmst nachzudenken, dann verpasst du den Moment. Also solltest du deinen Instinkten vertrauen und abdrücken und einfach das Beste hoffen.“ Wird das Foto gut werden? Die Sache ist: Du wirst es nie wissen, wenn du es nicht versuchst.

Fast Fashion / Boycott Boohoo

fast fashion Nadine Wilmanns photography

Fast Fashion /Boycott Boohoo

Fashion should be a happy-maker.  However, we know that it often isn`t. Large parts of the fashion industry are based on modern slavery and exploitation. This week, there were some headlines about the cheap high street brand Boohoo and its sister brands (e.g. Pretty Little Thing). The brands’ clothes have been produced in sweatshop factories in Leicester. Some workers there are getting paid 3,50 pounds per hour, working conditions are appalling. Plus: Workers were forced to come to work during lockdown despite being ill. Side note: The Boohoo owners are Billionaires.

We vote with our purses

Unfortunately, it`s not just Boohoo that happily encourages modern slavery in order to produce its garments as cheaply as possible. Having worked in this sector of Fashion, I can confirm just this.

We can be as appalled as we like, but if we don`t act on it, nothing will change. I think we all vote with our purses and how we spend our money – and be it just three pounds. Do we really want to give Billionaires our money, who are growing their fortune on the back of poor people?

The feeling is included

I know sustainable brands are WAY more expensive than brands that sell a T-Shirt for three pounds. But if we do buy sustainable, we get something extra included: The feeling of investing our money in good stuff, of doing something right, and fighting the good fight against inequality and injustice.

I much rather see the owner of a small business succeed than a company that is way too rich already. Thus, I want to spend my money accordingly and rather buy less instead.

fast fashion Nadine Wilmanns photography

Besides, when I wear something from a sustainable brand, I can literally feel the love coming through the fibers. It`s my imagination I guess, but I do feel so much more comfortable and at ease, and happy about what I`m wearing.

There are many brilliant articles about the Boohoo scandal out there, one I like best is on the Guardian page: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/jul/07/pandemic-fast-fashion-boohoo-influencer-landfill

Mode sollte eine Glücklichmacherin sein. Aber wir wissen, dass sie das oft nicht ist. Ein Großteil der Modeindustrie basiert auf moderner Sklaverei und Ausbeutung. Diese Woche waren die Billigmarke Boohoo und ihre Schwesterfirmen (zum Beispiel Pretty Little Thing) in den Schlagzeilen. Die Kleider der Marke werden in Sweatshop-Fabriken in England (Leicester) produziert. Einige Arbeiter bekommen da gerade mal 3, 50 Pfund die Stunde, die Arbeitsbedingungen sind erschreckend. Und: Arbeiter wurden dazu gezwungen, während des Lockdowns trotzdem sie krank waren zur Arbeit zu kommen. Kleine Info am Rande: Die Boohoo Eigentümer sind Billionäre.

Wir wählen mit unserem Geldbeutel

Leider ist es längst nicht nur Boohoo, die willentlich zu moderner Sklaverei animieren, um ihre Produktionskosten möglichst klein zu halten. Da ich in diesem Bereich der Mode gearbeitet habe, kann ich das nur bestätigen!

Wir können noch so entsetzt sein – solange wir nichts tun, wird sich natürlich nichts ändern. Ich denke, wir alle geben mit unserem Geldbeutel unsere Stimme ab. Also wir stimmen für etwas, indem wir Geld dafür liegen lassen – und seien es nur drei Euro… Und wollen wir wirklich Billionären unser Geld geben, die ihren Reichtum auf dem Rücken armer Leute vergrößern?

Gefühl mitgeliefert

Ich weiß, nachhaltige Marken sind viel teurer als solche, die T-Shirts für drei Euro haben. Aber wenn wir nachhaltige Kleider kaufen, bekommen wir das gute Gefühl mitgeliefert, das Richtige zu tun und im Kampf um Gerechtigkeit auf der richtigen Seite zu stehen. Ich wünsche dem Inhaber eines kleinen Unternehmens viel eher Erfolg als einem Betrieb, der sowieso schon viel zu reich ist. Deswegen will ich schauen, dass ich mein Geld entsprechend ausgebe. Lieber dafür dann eben weniger kaufen.

self-assignments The Ordinary Outfit Selfie Nadine Wilmanns photography

Wenn ich etwas Neues von einer nachhaltigen Marke anhabe, fühle ich außerdem die Liebe förmlich aus den Kleiderfasern strömen. Das ist vielleicht meine Einbildung, aber das Tragegefühl ist ein ganz anderes und ich fühle mich viel wohler – und zufriedener mit dem was ich anhabe. 

Es gibt einige gute Artikel über den Boohoo Skandal online. Ein Kommentar, der mir am Besten gefällt, ist auf der Seite des Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/jul/07/pandemic-fast-fashion-boohoo-influencer-landfill

Read more:

On Fashion

How to not give up

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking

How not to give up

A lot has been said and written about not giving up. That shows just how important it is. The other day, I`ve watched a video about the photographer Joel Grimes and what he said was: The big majority of all photography graduates don`t actually work as photographers, because they have given up too early. Talent is nice, but what really makes a person successful, is refusing to give up despite setbacks. Success means coming back over and over again.

Keep the faith up

My mum is a songwriter and has just published her first CD after years and years of trying to find the right people for the project. She`s heard a lot of “No”s on the way. And I would imagine that it hurt because the more personal the project is and the more passion you put into it, the more it hurts when it`s being rejected. However, she didn`t allow these “No”s to steal her joy and faith in what she was doing. Instead, she kept on trying and just did not give up – and eventually, it finally happened – the album is out: www.dorothewilmanns.de. “When disappointed, get reappointed”, says the famous preacher Joyce Meyer. The challenge is to keep the faith up, that something good will come up eventually. 

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking a step - courage and massive action

The Challenge: The more rejections, the more we have tried.

I tended to be a quitter because I get discouraged easily if I`m not careful. Plus, I often take rejection personal. But I do want to challenge myself to get right back on track over and over again. I just remembered a true story that my former coach Hans Schumann has told me: A teacher (I think it was a sales teacher) gave his students the task to get as many rejections as possible in one week – the one with the most rejections would win.

His point was: Setbacks and rejections are normal and hearing many “No”s just means that we have tried a lot. Seeing it as a challenge, almost kind of a sport, might help us to get right back out and ask again. By getting used to this habit, we might not even dread the “No”s so much anymore. Instead, we might pat ourselves on the shoulder and say: “Well done, tried again – off to the next one.”

Wie man nicht aufgibt

Man hört so viel darüber: „Gib nicht auf!“. Das zeigt, wie wichtig es ist. Neulich habe ich mir ein Video über den Fotografen Joel Grimes angeschaut und er sagte, dass die große Mehrheit der Leute, die Fotografie studiert haben, nicht als Fotografen arbeiten, weil sie zu früh aufgegeben haben. Talent ist schön, aber erfolgreich sind die, die sich trotz Rückschläge weigern, aufzugeben.

Durchhalten

Meine Mutter ist Songwriterin und hat gerade ihre erste CD veröffentlicht – nachdem sie viele Jahre lang nach den richtigen Leuten für das Projekt gesucht hat und dabei viele „Neins“ einstecken musste. Und ich kann mir vorstellen, dass das hart war. Denn je persönlicher ein Projekt ist und je mehr Begeisterung man reinsteckt, desto mehr trifft es einen, wenn es auf Ablehnung stößt. Aber sie hat sich die Freude nicht nehmen und sich nicht entmutigen lassen, sondern hat immer weitergemacht und nicht aufgegeben – und jetzt hat es geklappt, die CD ist da – www.dorothewilmanns.de. “When disappointed, get reappointed”, sagt die bekannte Predigerin Joyce Meyer, was so viel heißt wie: Wenn du enttäuscht bist, mach direkt einen neuen Plan. Die Herausforderung ist, weiter fest daran zu glauben, dass gute Dinge auf uns warten. 

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking a step- courage and massive action

Wenn wir viele Absagen bekommen, heißt das, dass wir viel versucht haben.

Ich tendiere dazu, zu schnell aufzugeben, weil ich mich leicht entmutigen lasse, wenn ich nicht aufpasse. Und ich nehme „Neins“ oft persönlich. Aber ich will mich selbst dazu herausfordern, mich nicht beirren zu lassen und einfach immer wieder weiterzumachen. Gerade ist mir noch was eingefallen, das mir mein ehemaliger Coach Hans Schumann erzählt hat: Ein Lehrer, der Vertreter ausgebildet hat, hat seinen Schülern die Aufgabe gegeben in einer Woche so viele „Neins“ wie möglich zu sammeln – der, der die meisten hat, gewinnt.

Was er damit sagen wollte: Rückschläge und Absagen sind ganz normal. Und wenn wir viele davon bekommen, dann heißt das nur, dass wir viel versucht haben. Wenn wir es als Herausforderung sehen, oder fast schon als eine Art Sport, dann könnte uns das helfen, gleich wieder weiterzumachen und weiter zu fragen. Durch dieses “Training” macht es uns vielleicht bald auch nicht mehr viel aus, „Neins“ zu hören. Stattdessen könnten wir uns auf die Schulter klopfen und uns loben. „Sehr gut gemacht, wieder was versucht – und auf zum Nächsten.“

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking
error: Content is protected