Christof Sage

magazine press interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

"There`s no such thing as can`t."

In Conversation with Christof Sage

If I was to name all the celebrities that Christof Sage (www.sage-press.de) has photographed it would probably take hours. Bill Clinton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Morgan Freeman, …. even Pope and Queen. And of course all the celebs in his home country Germany – Angela Merkel Thomas Gottschalk, Boris Becker,… Attached to the shoulder straps of his cameras are hundreds of admission wristbands of all the big events that he`s been to as a press photographer. For years Christof Sage was traveling for magazines in order to photograph the most famous people in this world. Now, he has published his own glossy magazine – “Sage”. We met up in his home in Stuttgart-Filderstadt.

Christof, there are so many wanting to be high-profile photographers. Yet, only few make it. Why did you make it to the top?

That has to grow. You start in your twenties by getting into events. After time, people see you more and more often, if you present yourself well in terms of looks and attitude. But that takes years. In the Seventies, I attended the most important events. Then you get booked. In the Eighties, I photographed international celebrities at the set of the famous TV-Show “Wetten, dass…”. I started from the bottom. Things didn`t come easy, I wasn`t left with an inheritance or anything, I have worked very hard and with great diligence to achieve this.

Would you have thought, when you were twenty years old, that you would be photographing people like Bill Clinton one day?

No, I only knew that I wanted to have a house and a Porsche when I`m 60. I advise young people: You need to have a goal in mind. Where do you want to be when you`re 60? You need to divide and plan your life – what do you do between the ages of 20 and 30, 30 and 40? Before starting an apprenticeship, ask yourself: Do you have fun doing what you do? It`s not about money, you need to have love. I really do enjoy working with people. I have been working in a hundred different countries. That`s not that easy to achieve as a photographer. It worked out because I have worked twice as much as others, 17 hours each day. It requires great diligence – but that all comes back to you.

“It`s not about money, you need to have love.”

 

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

Why did you choose people-photography as your thing? I mean you could have as well become, say, for example, a landscape photographer, couldn`t you?

I love humans. The press likes to call me a celebrity photographer, but in fact, I`m a communication photographer, a people photographer – I photograph people. And communication is very important for my job: You have to do a warm-up with people. You can`t just place yourself in front of people`s faces – “Here we go!” But you need to make people loosen up. Only once you managed to do that, you can start taking photos. You should see me photographing abroad: I often don`t understand the language, but I joke, and they understand me at once.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
Press interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

You take pictures of people who don`t necessarily look like models, who need to look as good as possible on photos though – after all, they`re in the public eye. Are you retouching a lot?

I don`t have time for retouching. I`ve got jobs that are demanding 400 portraits in one day – from morning to late in the evening. You`ve got 30 to 60 seconds for each person, you can exchange a few words only. I give directions, make chit-chat, say „Stand like this or like that” – then, boom – photo. That`s a different way of photographing than it`s commonly known. That is fun, but only very few photographers have that skill. That`s what I`m getting booked for. People know: When Sage is in the house, everything runs like clockwork.

Sounds great – but as well like a lot of pressure…

Well, I need to be quick. The camera is pre-set – I don`t have time to configure settings when I`m shooting. The camera has to run in burst mode. The photographer Helmut Newton once asked me at an event: “Why do you use flash? You don`t need to – look, I photograph using only ambient light.” But he was no contract photographer. He was there for fun, not to deliver contract work. My work is about being fast. When I`m at a horse race I have to photograph 200 couples, approach everyone, observe who belongs to whom, when is which person at which table. Then you need to act fast, everything has to be done chop chop. That`s a completely different way of working. I do enjoy photographing these kinds of events – I`m in full action and completely in my element.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

Do you have a career highlight, maybe a photograph, that you love the most?

I don`t have that. Every photo is important to me. I have attended great events and am very grateful for that. If I set myself a goal I make it happen. There`s no such thing as can`t. Sometimes it needs three or four attempts. It has taken me years to get to know the right people to get accreditation for events like the Golden Globes. But that`s what makes it exciting. If you really want to achieve something, then you will succeed. But you won`t if you just try half-heartedly – then you`ll never make it. One has to be born to work independently, it`s not everybody’s cup of tea.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

“If you really want to achieve something, then you will succeed. But you won`t if you just try half-heartedly – then you`ll never make it.”

Your career started with film photography. How did you perceive the switch to digital?

Digital cameras have changed my work for the better. First, we refused to make the change, but only half a year in we bought the first digital camera for about 16000 Euro. You can now take better pictures with a smartphone than with that camera. When on delegation trips with the former chancellor Helmut Kohl and fellow politician Erwin Teufel the German press agency dpa wanted photos of every day. I had to transport camera films accompanied by escort vehicles. And while doing that I was missing on site. With digital everything was so much quicker and less complicated.

That`s quite a sign of trust that people like the former chancellor would take you on their state visits...

It`s been written about me: „Discretion is his life insurance“. When traveling with famous people you hear and see a lot of confidential things. Until this day I have been keeping my word of honor. Whatever private matters I would see or hear, I would never make them public. Only few are able to keep that word – there are people selling secrets and photos that aren`t meant for the public eye for 50 Euro.

And now there`s another milestone in your career: You`ve just published your very own magazine “Sage”!

You need to come up with new things all the time. Ask yourself: Where are my strengths? And then work on them further. Have new ideas. Where can I place my work on the market? Because of COVID, all events are being canceled for more than a year now, everything takes place online, so press photographers have nothing to photograph. Therefore I thought: If I can`t photograph, I have other people photograph for me and publish my own magazine “Sage”. Just lounging around or tidying my office all day isn`t for me. The magazine is a success – almost all copies have sold and I have to print more now.

magazine press interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

"Geht nicht gibt`s nicht."

Im Gespräch mit Christof Sage

Wollte ich alle Stars und Sternchen aufzählen, die Christof Sage (www.sage-press.de) schon fotografiert hat, säße ich vermutlich noch in zwei Stunden an dieser Aufzählung. Bill Clinton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Morgan Freeman, …- sogar Papst und Queen. Und natürlich sämtliche Bekanntheiten aus Deutschland – Angela Merkel, Thomas Gottschalk, Boris Becker, und und und. An den Schultergurten seiner Kameras hängen hunderte von Eintrittsbändchen von all den großen Veranstaltungen, die er als Pressefotograf besucht hat. Jahrelang war er für Magazine unterwegs, um die berühmtesten Menschen dieser Welt abzulichten. Jetzt hat er sein eigenes Hochglanzmagazin herausgebracht – „Sage“. Wir haben uns in seinem Zuhause in Filderstadt getroffen.

Mensch, Christof, es gibt so viele, die Top-Fotograf werden möchten. Nur die Allerwenigsten schaffen es – warum hast du`s geschafft?

Sowas muss wachsen. Du fängst mit zwanzigmal an, in Veranstaltungen reinzukommen. Irgendwann sehen dich die Leute immer öfter, wenn du dich optisch und menschlich gut verkaufst. Das dauert aber Jahre. In den 70er Jahren war ich bei den wichtigsten Events dabei. Dann wirst du gebucht. In den 80er Jahren habe ich bei der Fernsehshow „Wetten, dass…“ Weltstars fotografiert. Ich habe bei null angefangen. Mir wurde nichts geschenkt, ich habe nichts geerbt, habe mir alles selbst hart erarbeitet – mit sehr viel Fleiß.

Hättest du mit zwanzig gedacht, dass du mal Leute wie Bill Clinton fotografierst?

Nein, ich wusste nur, dass ich mit sechzig ein Haus und einen Porsche möchte. Ich rate jungen Menschen immer: Ihr braucht ein Ziel vor Augen: Wo wollt ihr mit 60 sein? Ihr müsst euch das Leben einteilen – was macht ihr von 20 bis 30, von 30 bis 40? Bevor ihr eine Ausbildung beginnt, überlegt euch: Habe ich eigentlich Spaß an dem was ich mache? Es geht nicht ums Geld, du brauchst Liebe dafür. Mir macht es Freude, mit Menschen zu arbeiten. Ich habe in hundert Ländern auf der Erde gearbeitet. Das musst du als Fotograf erstmal schaffen. Das hat funktioniert, weil ich doppelt so viel gearbeitet habe, als die anderen, jeden Tag 17 Stunden. Du musst sehr viel Fleiß aufbringen – aber das kommt dann alles zurück.

“Es geht nicht um`s Geld. Du brauchst Liebe dafür.”

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

Warum hast du dir People-Fotografie als Spezialität ausgesucht? Du hättest ja auch sagen wir mal Landschaftsfotografie machen können?

Ich liebe die Menschen. Die Presse betitelt mich gerne als Promi- oder Star-Fotograf, aber eigentlich bin ich Kommunikationsfotograf, People-Fotograf – ich fotografiere Menschen. Und Kommunikation ist dabei wichtig: Du muss mit den Leuten erstmal ein Warm-up machen. Du kannst dich nicht einfach hinstellen – „so jetzt geht`s los“. Sondern, du musst die Leute auflockern. Erst wenn du das geschafft hast, kann`s losgehen. Du solltest mich mal sehen, wenn ich im Ausland fotografiere: Ich verstehe die Sprache oft nicht, mache einen Witz daraus und die anderen verstehen mich sofort.

Du fotografierst ja Menschen, die nicht unbedingt wie Models aussehen, aber auf Fotos möglichst gut aussehen müssen – schließlich stehen sie in der Öffentlichkeit. Bist du da viel am Retuschieren?

Zeit für Retuschieren habe ich nicht. Ich habe Aufträge, da mache ich 400 Portraits an einem Tag – von morgens bis abends. Da hast du für jeden 30 bis 60 Sekunden, zwei Sätze. Ich führe Regie, halte kurz Small-Talk, sage schon mal „Steh so oder so“ – dann, zack – Foto. Das ist eine andere Art zu fotografieren, als man es für gewöhnlich kennt. Das macht Spaß, aber das können wirklich nur wenige Fotografen. Dafür werde ich gebucht – die Leute wissen: wenn Sage da ist, läuft`s.

Klingt super – aber ja, auch nach Druck...

Bei mir muss es schnell gehen. Die Kamera ist voreingestellt – ich habe keine Zeit, noch Sachen einzustellen. Der Motor muss laufen. Der Fotograf Helmut Newton fragte mich mal auf einer Veranstaltung: „Warum verwendest du Blitz? Das brauchst du doch nicht – schau, ich fotografiere mit dem Licht, das da ist“. Aber er ist kein Auftragsfotograf. Er war da zum Vergnügen, nicht um Auftragsarbeit abzuliefern. Bei mir geht es um Schnelligkeit. Bei einem Pferderennen muss ich 200 Paare durchfotografieren, muss auf jeden zugehen, muss beobachten, wer gehört zu wem, wann ist wer an welchem Tisch. Da musst du schnell handeln, alles muss zack-zack gehen, das ist eine ganz andere Arbeit. Ich muss volle Leistung bringen. Und nach zwei Stunden ist es vorbei. Solche Events machen mir Spaß – da bin ich in Action, ganz in meinem Element.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
press interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

Hast du ein Karriere-Highlight, ein Foto, über das du dich besonders freust?

Sowas habe ich nicht. Für mich ist jedes Foto wichtig. Ich habe tolle Veranstaltungen mitgemacht und bin dafür sehr dankbar. Wenn ich mir Ziele setzte, verwirkliche ich sie. Geht nicht gibt`s nicht.  Manchmal braucht es drei oder vier Anläufe. Es hat Jahre gedauert, um die richtigen Leute kennenzulernen, um Akkreditierungen für Veranstaltungen wie die Golden Globes zu bekommen. Aber darin liegt der Reiz. Wenn man etwas wirklich erreichen will, dann erreicht man es auch. Aber nicht, wenn man etwas halbherzig macht – dann schafft man`s nie. Für das selbständige Arbeiten muss man geboren sein, das liegt nicht jedem.

Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography
Christof sage interview Nadine Wilmanns photography

“Wenn man etwas wirklich erreichen will, dann erreicht man es auch. Aber nicht, wenn man etwas halbherzig macht – dann schafft man`s nie.”

Du hast deine Karriere ja noch mit Film begonnen. Wie hast du den Wechsel zur Digitalfotografie erlebt?

Digitalkameras haben meine Arbeit zum Positiven verändert. Erst wollten wir den Wechsel nicht mitmachen, aber schon nach einem halben Jahr haben wir unsere erste digitale Kamera für 16 000 Euro gekauft. Da machst du heute mit dem Handy bessere Bilder, als damit. Bei den Delegationsreisen mit Helmut Kohl und Erwin Teufel wollte die dpa jeden Tag Fotos. Ich musste oft Filme mit Eskorte-Fahrzeugen transportieren – und habe in der Zeit dann vor Ort gefehlt. Digital geht alles viel schneller und unkomplizierter.  

Das ist ein ganz schön großer Vertrauensbeweis, wenn dich Leute wie der ehemalige Bundeskanzler zu Reisen mitnehmen...

Über mich wurde geschrieben: „Diskretion ist seine Lebensversicherung“. Wenn du mit bekannten Menschen unterwegs bist, hörst und siehst du viel Vertrauliches. Bis zum heutigen Tag gilt mein Ehrenwort. Egal welche vertraulichen Sachen ich höre oder sehe, ich würde damit nie an die Öffentlichkeit gehen. Das können die Wenigsten – es gibt ja Leute, die für 50 Euro Geheimnisse verraten oder Bilder verkaufen, die nicht für die Öffentlichkeit bestimmt sind.

Und jetzt gibt`s einen neuen Meilenstein in deiner Karriere: du hast dein eigenes Magazin „Sage“ herausgebracht!

Du musst dir immer neue Sachen einfallen lassen. Dich immer fragen: wo liegen meine Stärken? Und die ausarbeiten. Neue Ideen haben. Wo kann ich meine Art von Arbeit an den Mann bringen? Bei uns Presse-Fotografen sind wegen Corona seit einem Jahr alle Events abgesagt, alles nur noch online, nichts mehr zu fotografieren. Daher habe ich mir gedacht: wenn ich nicht fotografieren kann, lasse ich fotografieren und gebe mein eigenes Magazin „Sage“ heraus. Die ganze Zeit herumliegen und Büro aufräumen, das ist nichts für mich. Das Magazin ist ein Erfolg – fast alle Exemplare sind verkauft und ich muss bereits nachdrucken.

Magazine press interview

The-Ordinary-Project (and being grateful)

the ordinary Monstera plants Nadine Wilmanns photography

The-Ordinary-Project

(and being grateful)

The other week I wrote about the importance of having a defined personal project going as a photographer. (www.nadinewilmanns.com/self-assignment). Having written about it, of course I have been thinking what project I could focus on, but I couldn’t quite come up with something that would get me excited. While looking through older photos, I realized that I really value the pictures of very ordinary, everyday stuff .

Anyway, I found this could be a good project for me – given the current issue of social distancing. After all, the most important thing is just to start with something, anything really.

… what I take for granted

Focusing on the ordinary might as well help with something else I often struggle with: being grateful for basic things. Like breathing or a warm shower or breakfast. I tend to wish for more like a holiday at the seaside. Which isn`t very smart because too much discontent isn`t healthy. The other day I`ve read in the book ‘Living beyond your Feelings’ by Joice Meier about a brain scientist who states: “…. The toxic (negative) thoughts (…) will affect your entire body. They form a different type of chemical (in your brain) than a positive one does.” WTF!

That said, I`ve heard about the importance of gratitude and positive thoughts 1000 times and it makes sense to me. Yet, I often find it hard to feel true gratitude for stuff that I see and have every day and that I have learned to take for granted. Focusing more on them as a photographer and in a creative way might help me to literally “see the everyday in a new light”. Maybe you fancy trying the same? – Feel free to join the club; -)

Projekt "Gewöhnlich"

(und dankbar sein)

Vor ein paar Wochen habe ich darüber geschrieben, wie wichtig es als Fotograf ist, ein definiertes persönliches Projekt zu haben. (www.nadinewilmanns.com/self-assignment). Natürlich habe ich mir überlegt, welches Projekt ich starten könnte, kam aber irgendwie auf nichts Interessantes. Als ich durch alte Fotos geschaut habe, ist mir klar geworden, dass ich Bilder vom ganz Gewöhnlichen, Alltäglichen besonders mag. 

Jedenfalls dachte ich jetzt, das wäre eigentlich ein gutes Projekt für mich – zumal ich mit dem Corona-Abstand zur Zeit sowieso eingeschränkt bin. Und schließlich ist es das Wichtigste, einfach mal mit etwas, irgendetwas, zu beginnen.

“Selbstverständlichkeiten”…

Auf Gewöhnliches zu achten könnte außerdem bei etwas anderem helfen, mit dem ich oft Probleme habe: Dankbar sein für „normale“ Dinge. Sowas wie Atmen oder eine warme Dusche oder Frühstück. Ich will oft mehr, zum Beispiel ein Urlaub am Meer. Was nicht sehr klug ist, denn Unzufriedenheit ist ungesund. Neulich habe ich in einem Buch („Living beyond your Feelings“ by Joyce Meier) ein Zitat einer Gehirnforscherin gelesen: „… Die giftigen (negativen) Gedanken (…) haben Einfluss auf deinen ganzen Körper. Sie bilden andere chemische Stoffe (in deinem Gehirn) als positive Gedanken.“ WTF!

Andererseits habe ich schon 1000-mal gehört, wie wichtig Dankbarkeit und positive Gedanken sind und das macht für mich auch Sinn. Trotzdem finde ich es oft schwer, echte Dankbarkeit für Dinge zu fühlen, die ich jeden Tag sehe und habe. Es könnte also helfen, mich diesen „Selbstverständlichkeiten“ mehr und mit ein bisschen Kreativität zuzuwenden. Damit ich sie buchstäblich „in einem anderen Licht“ sehe… Vielleicht hast du Lust, das auch auszuprobieren ; -)

self-assignments The Ordinary Outfit Selfie Nadine Wilmanns photography

The Ordinary

The ordinary Light photography Light on white table cloth

The Ordinary

Lately, I`m reading a novel with the two main characters having a sabbatical traveling and exploring and I’m feeling such a wanderlust. It`s like a craving, like a thirst, only more somewhere towards the chest and stomach area. Longing for something out of the ordinary. Somehow, I strangely like this kind of intense aching for something. But often it gives me severe “fomo” (= fear of missing out;-)

the ordinary pair Nadine Wilmanns photography

The Ordinary - the typical Everyday

I`ve also recently started organizing my photo-chaos in Lightroom. While sorting through my old photographs, I`ve found something interesting: It`s often the pictures of the ordinary that I`m most happy about. Of course, there are shitloads of holiday pictures and I love them, too. But the most precious photos are those of everyday stuff. Those which document the character of a certain period of my life. Those that show something I don`t regularly do anymore because times have changed.

the ordinary broken glasses Nadine Wilmanns photography

The clothes I used to wear or what I used to eat. What habits I used to have. The regular Supermarket visits with my friends on the way home after a uni day. My grans’ glasses next to her sewing machine. The legwarmers and tennis skirt combo I loved to wear. Traveling home from work, regular coffee shop, yoga studio, the evening sun in the kitchen, watering plants, going church, walking the dog round the block, wearing my favourite pullover,…

Time capsules

Pictures of these everyday things are little time capsules. When being disheartened about a very ordinary day, I want to remind myself: What is normal for me now might not be part of my life any more one day. I might move house, friends might move, I might work differently, my taste might change or my habits. One day I might think: “I wish I had appreciated these things more when I still had the chance.”

While I still have my longing for something different inside me, I do want to document and not miss the everyday of my life as it is now. I want to remind myself: where I am at the moment there is some sort of beauty, too.

Das Gewöhnliche

Gerade lese ich ein Buch, in dem die beiden Hauptpersonen ein Jahr Pause von ihrem Alltag machen und jeweils auf Entdeckungsreisen gehen. Und ich bekomme riesiges Fernweh, das sich wie Durst anfühlt, nur eher in Brust- und Magengegend. Irgendwie mag ich dieses Sehnsuchtsgefühl. Aber oft macht es mir auch „fomo“, „fear of missing out“, also die Angst, etwas zu verpassen.

the ordinary home documentary

Typisch Alltag

Vor ein paar Tagen habe ich endlich mal damit angefangen, mein Foto-Chaos in Lightroom aufzuräumen. Als ich meine alten Fotos sortiert habe, habe ich etwas Interessantes bemerkt: Oft freue ich mich am meisten über die Fotos von ganz gewöhnlichen Momenten. Natürlich habe ich auch ganz viele Urlaubsbilder und ich liebe die auch. Aber am wertvollsten sind mir die Bilder von alltäglichen Dingen. Solche, die typisch sind für eine Zeit in meinem Leben und die jetzt nicht mehr zu meinem Alltag gehören, weil sich die Zeit einfach geändert hat.

Planting the ordinary

Die Kleider, die ich anhatte, was ich gegessen habe, oder welche Gewohnheiten ich hatte. Regelmäßige Supermarkt-Abstecher mit meinen Freundinnen auf dem Nachhauseweg von der Hochschule. Die Brille meiner Oma neben ihrer Nähmaschine. Die Stulpen – Tennisröckchen- Kombi, die ich geliebt habe. Zur Arbeit pendeln, Stammcafé, Yogastudio, die Nachmittagssonne in der Küche, Blumen gießen, Kirche gehen, Hundespaziergang um den Block, meinen Lieblingspulli,…

Zeitkapseln

Bilder von diesen alltäglichen Sachen sind wie kleine Zeitkapseln. Wenn ich genervt von einem allzu gewöhnlichen Tag bin, will ich mich daran erinnern: Was jetzt für mich normal ist, wird vielleicht mal nicht mehr Teil meines Lebens sein. Kann sein, dass ich umziehe, dass Freunde wegziehen, dass ich anders arbeite, dass sich mein Geschmack oder meine Gewohnheiten ändern. Eines Tages werde ich denken: „Ich wünschte, ich hätte diese Dinge mehr geschätzt, als ich noch die Möglichkeit dazu hatte.“  

Ich habe nach wie vor Fernweh in mir, aber ich will auch dokumentieren – und nicht verpassen – was gerade in meinem alltäglichen Leben vor sich geht. Mich erinnern, dass da wo ich gerade bin, auch eine Art von Schönheit zu finden ist.

How to not give up

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking

How not to give up

A lot has been said and written about not giving up. That shows just how important it is. The other day, I`ve watched a video about the photographer Joel Grimes and what he said was: The big majority of all photography graduates don`t actually work as photographers, because they have given up too early. Talent is nice, but what really makes a person successful, is refusing to give up despite setbacks. Success means coming back over and over again.

Keep the faith up

My mum is a songwriter and has just published her first CD after years and years of trying to find the right people for the project. She`s heard a lot of “No”s on the way. And I would imagine that it hurt because the more personal the project is and the more passion you put into it, the more it hurts when it`s being rejected. However, she didn`t allow these “No”s to steal her joy and faith in what she was doing. Instead, she kept on trying and just did not give up – and eventually, it finally happened – the album is out: www.dorothewilmanns.de. “When disappointed, get reappointed”, says the famous preacher Joyce Meyer. The challenge is to keep the faith up, that something good will come up eventually. 

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking a step - courage and massive action

The Challenge: The more rejections, the more we have tried.

I tended to be a quitter because I get discouraged easily if I`m not careful. Plus, I often take rejection personal. But I do want to challenge myself to get right back on track over and over again. I just remembered a true story that my former coach Hans Schumann has told me: A teacher (I think it was a sales teacher) gave his students the task to get as many rejections as possible in one week – the one with the most rejections would win.

His point was: Setbacks and rejections are normal and hearing many “No”s just means that we have tried a lot. Seeing it as a challenge, almost kind of a sport, might help us to get right back out and ask again. By getting used to this habit, we might not even dread the “No”s so much anymore. Instead, we might pat ourselves on the shoulder and say: “Well done, tried again – off to the next one.”

Wie man nicht aufgibt

Man hört so viel darüber: „Gib nicht auf!“. Das zeigt, wie wichtig es ist. Neulich habe ich mir ein Video über den Fotografen Joel Grimes angeschaut und er sagte, dass die große Mehrheit der Leute, die Fotografie studiert haben, nicht als Fotografen arbeiten, weil sie zu früh aufgegeben haben. Talent ist schön, aber erfolgreich sind die, die sich trotz Rückschläge weigern, aufzugeben.

Durchhalten

Meine Mutter ist Songwriterin und hat gerade ihre erste CD veröffentlicht – nachdem sie viele Jahre lang nach den richtigen Leuten für das Projekt gesucht hat und dabei viele „Neins“ einstecken musste. Und ich kann mir vorstellen, dass das hart war. Denn je persönlicher ein Projekt ist und je mehr Begeisterung man reinsteckt, desto mehr trifft es einen, wenn es auf Ablehnung stößt. Aber sie hat sich die Freude nicht nehmen und sich nicht entmutigen lassen, sondern hat immer weitergemacht und nicht aufgegeben – und jetzt hat es geklappt, die CD ist da – www.dorothewilmanns.de. “When disappointed, get reappointed”, sagt die bekannte Predigerin Joyce Meyer, was so viel heißt wie: Wenn du enttäuscht bist, mach direkt einen neuen Plan. Die Herausforderung ist, weiter fest daran zu glauben, dass gute Dinge auf uns warten. 

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking a step- courage and massive action

Wenn wir viele Absagen bekommen, heißt das, dass wir viel versucht haben.

Ich tendiere dazu, zu schnell aufzugeben, weil ich mich leicht entmutigen lasse, wenn ich nicht aufpasse. Und ich nehme „Neins“ oft persönlich. Aber ich will mich selbst dazu herausfordern, mich nicht beirren zu lassen und einfach immer wieder weiterzumachen. Gerade ist mir noch was eingefallen, das mir mein ehemaliger Coach Hans Schumann erzählt hat: Ein Lehrer, der Vertreter ausgebildet hat, hat seinen Schülern die Aufgabe gegeben in einer Woche so viele „Neins“ wie möglich zu sammeln – der, der die meisten hat, gewinnt.

Was er damit sagen wollte: Rückschläge und Absagen sind ganz normal. Und wenn wir viele davon bekommen, dann heißt das nur, dass wir viel versucht haben. Wenn wir es als Herausforderung sehen, oder fast schon als eine Art Sport, dann könnte uns das helfen, gleich wieder weiterzumachen und weiter zu fragen. Durch dieses “Training” macht es uns vielleicht bald auch nicht mehr viel aus, „Neins“ zu hören. Stattdessen könnten wir uns auf die Schulter klopfen und uns loben. „Sehr gut gemacht, wieder was versucht – und auf zum Nächsten.“

how to not give up Nadine Wilmanns photography foot walking

In your style

in your style light on coffee shop chairs light photography

In your style

There is so much to say about having a personal style as a photographer and I`m not even entirely sure if I have a very distinctive one yet. However, there is something that I heard today, which relates to the style thing. And I really want to keep this in my head and my heart:

It`s something that actor Bryan Cranson said about auditions. And that basically goes for every job interview in the creative industry:

“You’re not going there to get a job.  You’re going there to present what you do. There it is – and walk away… And there is power in that.  There’s confidence in that, and it’s also saying ‘I can only do so much’…”

I think this could be a key to actually like what I HAVE to do because it`s a job: Not trying to be like some other photographer in order to please people’s expectations. But having a mindset of faith and doing and presenting what is true to myself. And accept that some might not like it and maybe hire someone else. It`s better for me not to have the job if otherwise, I would lose the love and the drive for what I`m doing.

...a job that I enjoy

Much easier said than done though as it takes some courage and confidence. But really, everyone`s taste is different anyway and so is everyone’s vision. Having faith, deciding to act on it, and sticking to this decision might be what makes all the difference between a job and a job that I enjoy.

More about personal style is in the video “Finding your Style” by John Keatley on lynda.com -unfortunately it`s members only.

In deinem Stil

Es gibt so viel darüber zu sagen, als Fotograf einen persönlichen Stil zu haben – und ich bin mir noch nicht mal sicher, ob ich einen sehr ausgeprägten Stil habe. Aber heute habe ich etwas gehört, das mit der Stil-Sache zu tun hat, und das wirklich in meinem Kopf und in meinem Herzen verankern möchte:

Es ist etwas, das der Schauspieler Bryan Cranson über das Vorsprechen bei Auditions gesagt hat. Das gilt eigentlich in jedem Vorstellungsgespräch für einen kreativen Job:

„Du gehst da nicht hin, um den Job zu bekommen. Du gehst hin, um deine Arbeit zu präsentieren. Hier ist sie – und du gehst wieder… Und darin ist Stärke. Darin ist Selbstvertrauen und es sagt auch ,Ich kann nur so viel machen‘…“

Das könnte ein Schlüssel sein, um wirklich zu mögen was ich tun MUSS, weil es ein Job ist. Nicht versuchen, so zu sein, wie ein anderer Fotograf, um irgendwelchen Erwartungen gerecht zu werden. Sondern eine Haltung des Glaubens und des Vertrauens haben. Das tun und zeigen, was mir und meinem Stil entspricht. Und akzeptieren, dass es einige nicht mögen werden und vielleicht jemand anderen engagieren werden. Es ist besser für mich, den Job nicht zu haben, wenn ich sonst die Liebe und die Motivation für das was ich tue verlieren würde.

...einen Job, den ich mag

Das ist natürlich viel leichter gesagt als getan, weil man Mut und Selbstvertrauen dafür braucht. Aber mal ehrlich, es hat sowieso jeder einen anderen Geschmack und genauso hat auch jeder einen anderen Blick. Glauben und Vertrauen zu haben, mich dazu zu entscheiden entsprechend zu handeln und mich an diesen Entschluss zu halten, könnte den Unterschied machen zwischen einem Job und einem Job den ich mag.

Mehr zum persönlichen Stil gibt es im Video “Finding your Style” von John Keatley auf lynda.com – da muss man nur leider Mitglied sein. 

In the Mirror

Mirror Selfie Fashion memories t-Shirt Darling in mirror

In the mirror

I love a good mirror selfie. The reflection gives the picture some sort of depth and context, a special atmosphere, and an extra portion of meaning. I can blur a bit, I can hide a bit, yet I still have evidence of myself in that very moment.

Mirror selfies offer the chance to include myself in the scene. When I`m out with friends it`s become almost like a reflex to take a mirror selfie of us when seeing our reflection in a shop window.   

"....this is my life, and everything is changing."

While experimenting with mirror portraits we might as well find out aspects about ourselves, that we haven`t seen before. And at the same time learn to appreciate ourselves a bit more. Selfies can be a way of exploring our very individual beauty. Of valuing ourselves in a certain moment of our little life.

Stephanie Calabrese Roberts writes in her book “Lens on Life”: “…you can look at yourself and say ‘Yes, my hair is not perfect in that picture or I don`t look exactly as I thought I would look.  But that`s me and this is my life, and everything is changing. Tomorrow I`m going to look a different way. Some day I`m going to die and my body won`t be here at all.’ I think self-portraiture helps you grow your self-acceptance so you can desensitize yourself to that judgement.”

Im Spiegel

Ich liebe ein gutes Spiegel-Selfie.  Die Spiegelung gibt dem Bild eine besondere Tiefe und einen Bezug zur Umgebung. Das Bild bekommt eine spezielle Atmosphäre und eine Extraportion Bedeutung. Ich kann ein bisschen verschwimmen, mich ein bisschen verstecken und trotzdem habe ich eine Spur von mir in dem Moment.

Mit Spiegel-Selfies kann ich mich mit in eine Szene platzieren. Wenn ich mit Freunden unterwegs bin ist es schon fast zum Reflex geworden, ein Spiegel-Selfie von uns zu machen, wenn wir uns in einer Spiegelung eines Schaufensters sehen.

"...das ist mein Leben und alles verändert sich ständig."

Wenn wir mit Spiegel-Portraits experimentieren, könnten wir Aspekte an uns entdecken, die wir vorher gar nicht so wahrgenommen haben. Gleichzeitig können wir lernen, ein bisschen dankbarer für uns selbst zu sein. Mit Selfies können wir unsere individuelle Schönheit erkunden und uns in diesem Moment unseres kleinen Lebens schätzen.

Stephanie Calabrese Roberts schreibt in ihrem Buch „Lens on Life“: „…du kannst dich anschauen und sagen ‚Ja, meine Haare sind nicht perfekt auf dem Bild oder ich sehe nicht genau so aus wie ich gedacht habe. Aber das bin ich und das ist mein Leben und alles verändert sich ständig. Morgen werde ich ein bisschen anders aussehen. Eines Tages werde ich sterben und mein Körper wird gar nicht mehr hier sein.‘ Ich denke Selbstportraits helfen dir dabei, Selbstakzeptanz zu entwickeln, so dass du unempfindlicher wirst gegenüber Werturteilen.“

How to remember

rain in sun How to remember Nadine Wilmanns photography

How to remember

Unfortunately, I have to admit, that my memory isn`t particularly good. The other day Richard and I were watching “The Truman Show” and I know that I`ve seen this film before. But honestly: I couldn`t really recall anything of it anymore. I`m like that with a lot of things that have happened; sometimes I have forgotten that certain events have taken place altogether. Photographs are of course good helpers with reviving lost memories. But the effect of photography goes way further than that.

Even if I have never seen the photograph itself: if I have taken a picture, an event is much more likely to stay in my memory. My first car boot sale: I had my film camera with me, loaded with a black-and-white film. The shop that was meant to develop the film, destroyed it. But the picture that I`ve taken, just after I found a Picard handbag for a fiver, is still in my head. In black and white, combined with the mood of that day.

Or if I have lost the photograph: Having just found my lost favorite necklace, I was sitting in the laundrette and sent a phone picture of me and the necklace to my friend. I have no idea if I still have that photo anywhere, I certainly have a different phone. But the picture of that very moment is still with me.

It`s becoming more difficult when a good moment happens, and the surroundings are unphotogenic. I don`t find it fun to take a picture (never mind keeping it) if I don`t like its look. Then I keep my eyes open for some detail (because there`s always something that`s kind of nice) and be it just my own feet. A picture of this can be like a stand-in for the moment. Like a souvenir- just for free.

Wie man sich erinnert

Leider musste ich schon oft feststellen, dass mein Gedächtnis nicht besonders gut ist. Richard und ich haben neulich „Die Truman Show“ geschaut und ich weiß, dass ich den Film schon mal gesehen habe. Aber ehrlich: ich hatte keine Ahnung mehr von irgendwas.  So geht es mir mit vielen Erlebnissen; von manchen habe ich sogar vergessen, dass ich sie überhaupt erlebt habe. Fotografien helfen natürlich dabei, solche Erinnerungen zurückzuholen. Aber der Foto-Effekt ist mehr als das.

Auch wenn ich das Foto selbst nie gesehen habe, bleibt ein Erlebnis eher in meinem Kopf, wenn ich ein Bild gemacht habe. Mein erster Flohmarkt: Ich hatte meine Filmkamera dabei und einen Schwarz-Weiß-Film drin. Aber das Fotostudio, das meinen Film entwickeln sollte, hat ihn kaputt gemacht. Das Bild, das ich gemacht habe, gerade als ich eine Picard-Handtasche für fünf Euro gefunden habe, habe ich trotzdem noch im Kopf. In schwarz-weiß, zusammen mit dem Gefühl des Tages.

Oder, wenn ich das Foto längst nicht mehr finde: Ich hatte gerade meine verlorene Lieblingskette wiedergefunden, sitze im Waschsalon und schicke meiner Freundin ein Handyfoto von der Kette um meinen Hals. Ich habe keine Ahnung, ob ich das Foto noch irgendwo habe, das Handy sicher nicht, aber das Bild von dem Moment ist noch bei mir.

Ein bisschen schwieriger wird es, wenn ein guter Moment in einer unfotogenen Umgebung passiert. Es macht mir keinen Spaß, ein Foto zu machen (oder zu behalten) wenn`s nicht gut aussieht. Dann schaue ich nach einem Detail (denn irgendwas ist immer schön) und sei es nur meine Füße. Ein Foto davon ist wie eine Art Platzhalter für den Moment an sich. Wie ein Souvenir – nur kostenlos.

How to remember Nadine Wilmanns photography

Self-Assignment

Self-Assignment. light on floor capture the 50:50

Self-Assignment

This week I`ve come to realize: in order to grow as a photographer it is very important to give myself an assignment for a personal project. Single strong photographs are all well and good. But a series of pictures can tell a much stronger, more complex story. Plus, personal projects contribute to a convincing body of work. They help with developing a unique style. And they challenge us to go out of our comfort zone.

Narrowing down the focus with a self-assignment

Of course, I constantly have the pursuit to document life. Or on a smaller scale document an event, a holiday, or a summer. However, I would benefit from a more specific self-assignment; from narrowing down my focus in order to gain more focus, if that makes sense.

And I would profit from taking on a more conceptual approach. Photographer Steve Simon recommends writing down a specific headline and description for each self-assigned project. “This can help clarify and focus your vision for a consistent point of view. It helps to form a framework for the project”, he says. “(It helps to) keep a tight thread around a theme, to make sure that all photos reflect that headline and to stay on point.”

The big question now is: what to self-assign?

Aufträge an sich selbst

Diese Woche ist mir klar geworden: Um mich als Fotografin weiter zu entwickeln, sollte ich mir selbst Aufträge für persönliche Projekte geben. Einzelne ausdrucksstarke Bilder sind schön und gut. Aber eine Bildserie kann eine viel überzeugendere, vielschichtigere Geschichte erzählen. Außerdem bilden persönliche Projekte einen guten Fundus an Arbeitsproben. Sie helfen dabei, einen einzigartigen Stil zu entwickeln. Und sie animieren uns dazu, uns aus unserer Komfortzone heraus zu bewegen.

Den Fokus einschränken

Natürlich bin ich ständig darauf aus, das Leben zu dokumentieren. Oder in einem kleineren Rahmen vielleicht eine Veranstaltung, einen Urlaub, oder einen Sommer. Allerdings würde es mir guttun, wenn ich mir spezifischere, präzisere „Aufträge“ erteilen würde. Wenn ich meinen Fokus einschränken würde, um mehr Fokus zu gewinnen.

Und ich würde davon profitieren, die Sache konzeptueller anzugehen. Fotograf Steve Simon empfiehlt, eine bestimmte Schlagzeile und eine Beschreibung für jedes selbst bestimmte Projekt zu notieren. „Das macht deinen Blick klarer. Es hilft dir, dich auf eine durchgängige Erzählung zu fokussieren und deinem Projekt einen Rahmen zu geben“, sagt er. „Sinnvoll ist, das Thema genau einzukreisen und sicherzustellen, dass alle Fotos des Projekts die Aussage der Schlagzeile treffen.“

Die große Frage ist jetzt: Was könnte ein Thema sein?

On embracing

on embracing Black and white photograph of girl with balloon

On embracing

“It´s always important to have a plan before you go out on a shot. That said, things are going to happen that is going to mess with your plan.” Today I have re-watched one of my favorite videos on Lynda.com about documentary photographer Paul Taggart documenting his brother and his family.

When I have a plan, but things don`t work out accordingly, I often get caught up in worries. I get nervous and grumpy inside. Afterwards, I wish I would have worked with the situation in confidence. Because thinking: ‘Oh shit, it`s not gonna work out, obsessing about bad light or weather and giving up early – all that keeps me from really focussing on what`s happening in front of me. I know from experience that when I just keep “working it” and don`t give up, I usually get good results. But I tend to forget.

Embracing real life

“Rather than worrying about not getting the picture that I wanted, I just run with the moment”, says Paul Taggart. Because that`s “real life” happening. After all, that’s what photography is all about: documenting something genuine and real, picturing true and authentic moments.

Paul Taggart says: “All those obstacles are just going to make it better in the end. As long as you embrace them, you`re going to come out with some better pictures.”

So, when things don`t go to plan, I really want to remember:  if I embrace and work with the situation as it is, there`s going to be a good picture. I guess that goes for all life – trust in God that he will lead all things with higher knowledge. And on a smaller scale of photography: Trust that all happenings, all light or weather or stuff will eventually be my blessing. And that with some creative thinking (not blocked by worries), I`ll find a way to make something more genuine and authentic than I had planned in the first place.

Vom Annehmen

“Es ist wichtig, Plan zu haben, wenn man für ein Fotoshooting raus geht. Andererseits werden Dinge passieren, die deinen Plan durcheinanderbringen werden.“ Heute habe ich eines meiner Lieblingsvideos auf www.lynda.com angeschaut, in dem Dokumentarfotograf Paul Taggart einige Tage im Alltag seines Bruders und dessen Familie dokumentiert.

Wenn ich einen Plan habe, aber die Dinge nicht so laufen, wie ich`s mir vorgestellt habe, werde ich oft schnell innerlich unruhig und unzufrieden. Hinterher wünschte ich mir jedes mal, ich hätte mehr Vertrauen in mich gehabt, die Situation gut zu meistern. Denn zu denken ‚Ach Shit, es läuft nicht‘ und mich wegen schlechtem Licht oder Wetter verrückt zu machen und zu früh aufzugeben – all das hält mich davon ab, mich wirklich auf das zu konzentrieren, was ich gerade vor mir habe. Ich weiß eigentlich: wenn ich dranbleibe, verschiedene Dinge ausprobiere und nicht aufgebe, bekomme ich meistens auch gute Ergebnisse. Nur vergesse ich das immer wieder.

Das wahre Leben...

“Anstatt mich darüber zu ärgern, dass ich nicht die Bilder bekomme, die ich wollte, gehe ich einfach mit dem Moment mit”, sagt Paul Taggart.  Denn das ist das “echte Leben“ und darum geht es schließlich beim Fotografieren: Etwas Echtes und „Wahres“ zu festzuhalten, ehrliche und authentische Momente zu dokumentieren.

Paul Taggart sagt: „Alle diese Hindernisse werden deine Bilder am Ende nur besser machen. Solange du sie Willkommen heißt, wirst du mit besseren Fotos nach Hause gehen.“

Wenn`s mal wieder nicht läuft, will ich versuchen dran zu denken: wenn ich der Situation vertraue und mit ihr arbeite, dann wird da auch ein gutes Bild sein. Ich denke, das gilt im Leben generell  – Gott vertrauen, dass er die Dinge mit seinem höheren Wissen gut für uns laufen lässt. Und beim Fotoshooting: Vertrauen, dass alles, was passiert, Licht, Wetter, was auch immer, am Ende ein Segen für mich ist. Und dass mit kreativem Nachdenken (und ohne Ärger im Kopf) etwas Ehrlicheres und Authentischeres dabei rauskommt, als ich vielleicht erwartet hatte.

How to get the feeling into the picture

feeling into the picture light photography light on plant

How to get the feeling into the picture

THE most important element in a photo is emotion; that it makes me feel something. A technically perfect picture doesn`t mean much to me, if I don`t feel anything when looking at it. “A good photograph is one that communicates a fact, touches the heart and leaves the viewer a changed person for having seen it”, said photographer Irving Penn.

Picturing emotion is not so much related to technique or camera equipment. It`s much more complex and has something to do with our own personality. And it isn`t received by all viewers in the same way.

The light is a major factor for emotion. Good light almost always creates atmosphere. For example, I try to look out for light and photograph just that – regardless what else is in the frame, and I`m often surprised about the magic happening just by the light.

A second element is the photographers‘ personality. It`s influenced by memories. Those that we actually remember and those that are subconsciously with us and that we can`t recollect any more.  „Many of your best images will come from people, experiences and places that feel familiar to you in some way because they connect you with the past”, writes Stephanie Calabrese Roberts in “Lens on Life”.

Pictures in our heads

Therefore, everyone has a one-of-a-kind view of the world. Because everyone has his very own memories. Which is a good thing, as therefore each style is unique, too. We all have our own personal pictures in our heads, which we have captured and stored without a camera, but with our eyes only.

Slide with old photo feeling into the picture

 A few friends of mine have an amazing eye and sometimes I have wished to have their eye. But that`s rubbish because every perspective is a personal one and photography as well is always something very personal. And back to the emotion: I think, the best chance to get some feeling in a picture is (apart from the light) to FEEL something as a photographer while taking the shot. To emotionally connect with what`s in front of the camera. If I had seen, what my friend has seen, I most likely would not have had the same connection as she has had. Because her memories are entirely different from mine. And I then wouldn´t have been able to deliver the same emotion in the picture.

That encourages us once again to truly be ourselves. Trusting, that our perspective is one-of-a-kind and that this shines through in our photographs. Being authentic allows us to communicate genuine emotion with our photography.

Gefühl ins Bild

Das Allerwichtigste bei einem Foto ist für mich, dass es bei mir ein Gefühl hinterlässt. Ein technisch perfektes Bild bringt mir gar nichts, wenn ich nichts dabei fühle, wenn ich es anschaue. “Ein gutes Foto kommuniziert eine Tatsache, berührt das Herz und lässt den Betrachter, da er es gesehen hat, als veränderte Person zurück”, hat der Fotograf Irving Penn gesagt.

Gefühl in ein Foto zu kriegen, hängt nicht so sehr viel mit Kamera-Ausrüstung und Technik zusammen. Das ist viel komplexer und hat was mit der eigenen Persönlichkeit zu tun. Und es kommt auch nicht bei jedem Betrachter das gleiche an.

Das Licht ist ein wichtiger Gefühlsfaktor. Gutes Licht macht eigentlich immer Atmosphäre. Ich versuche immer nach Licht Ausschau zu halten und nur das Licht – ganz unabhängig von dem was da noch auf dem Foto ist – zu fotografieren. Ich bin immer wieder überrascht, was für einen Zauber das Licht macht.

Ein zweiter Faktor ist die eigene Persönlichkeit. Da spielen die eigenen Erinnerungen mit rein. Solche, die uns bewusst sind und solche, die in unserem Unterbewusstsein da sind und an die wir uns gar nicht mehr richtig erinnern. „Viele unserer besten Fotos entstehen mit Menschen, bei Erlebnissen und an Orten, die uns vertraut vorkommen, weil sie uns mit unserer Vergangenheit verbinden”, schreibt Stephanie Calabrese Roberts in “Lens on Life”.

Die Bilder in unserem Kopf

Deswegen sieht jeder anders. Denn jeder hat ja andere Erinnerungen.  Was gut ist, denn so ist jeder Stil einzigartig. Wir alle haben Bilder in unseren Köpfen, die wir im Laufe unseres Lebens ohne Kamera, nur mit den Augen festgehalten und abgespeichert haben – und die einzigartig sind.

Slide with old photo feeling into the picture

Einige meiner Freundinnen haben ein unglaublich gutes Auge und manchmal habe ich mir gewünscht, ich hätte deren Blick. Aber das wäre Quatsch, denn jede Perspektive ist eine Persönliche. Und Fotografie ist auch immer etwas Persönliches. Und jetzt wieder zum Gefühl: Ich denke, die beste Möglichkeit, außer dem Licht, Gefühl ins Foto zu bringen, ist, wenn man als Fotograf beim Fotografieren etwas fühlt. Wenn man sich emotional mit dem, was vor der Kamera ist, verbinden kann. Hätte ich gesehen, was meine Freundin gesehen hat, hätte ich wahrscheinlich nicht die gleiche Verbindung gehabt wie sie, da sie ja ganz andere Erinnerungen hat als ich. Und ich hätte dann auch nicht das gleiche Gefühl im Bild vermitteln können.

Das ermutigt mal wieder, wirklich uns selbst zu sein. Darauf zu vertrauen, dass unser Blick besonders ist und das in unseren Bildern durchscheint. Denn als unser authentisches und einzigartiges Selbst haben wir die Chance echtes Gefühl in unsere Bilder bringen.

Read more: 

Home-Photography