Paul Fuller

Paul Fuller portrait

Fascinated by the chaos

In Conversation with Paul Fuller

Paul Fuller is a filmmaker and photographer working in fashion, music, documentary, portrait, and fine art. His work is full of atmosphere and wonder. His latest project is an arts and culture website that features artists who he and his project partners choose. A lot of his images are taken close to his home in the Hackney Marshes – a green strip of nature along the River Lea in East London. This is where we meet for a walk and a chat.

Your images are looking like taken on film. Are they? Or is that a deliberate style you are aiming at in post-production?

Some will be shot on film, and some won`t be. I go through phases. And I have, as most photographers do, probably far too many cameras, film and digital. But it`s not that I`m trying to make it look like film. What I`m trying is to make it not look like digital. Digital is too clean, too perfect and it`s great for some things. But I like to muck it up a bit and make it a little bit less clear and more atmospheric. However, I didn`t start on film and wanted to try to maintain that look. Because when I started getting really interested in photography, digital cameras were already about.

On your website are a lot of images of personal projects. How do you find and choose them?

There`s not a lot of paid stuff on my website. In fact, very little. Most of it is just me doing it for fun. For example, I go to a lot of gigs and if there’s a band I really like and that looks interesting, I might send them a message if they can send me a photo pass for their gig – just because I enjoy doing it. I always take a camera with me when I`m out running and most of my pictures from around the Hackney Marshes were taken while I was running. But I wouldn`t want to do only one thing repeatedly. Therefore, I wouldn`t want to specialize as a music or fashion photographer. I don`t like it when things are getting too repetitive, but I like to photograph a lot of different things.

“I wouldn`t want to specialize as a music or fashion photographer, but I like to photograph a lot of different things.” 

Photographer Paul Fuller in front of a tree stump in the Hackney Marshes

Do you find that this personal work is benefiting your paid work?

It`s practice for a start. Also, when I do a lot of video stuff, I miss doing photography and need to pick up my camera and do something for myself.  When you do work for yourself you can do what you like. Whereas, when you do a job for somebody else, they usually have a certain type of picture in mind. Of course, you can still put some of your own spin into it – after all, the reason they ask you in the first place is hopefully that they`ve seen some of your personal work on the website and like it. But the portraits I`m taking for our new arts and culture website for example: I`m not thinking of anybody else`s opinion apart from what I want to get out of it – and that is great to be able to do that.

How did you get on when you started out as a freelancer in London after you left your job as a newspaper art director?

When I went freelance, somebody I have worked with at the newspaper referred me to some friends of theirs who had set up a company and needed videos for crafts tutorials. I ended up doing all their videos and some photography. They later referred me to a street style website, so I ended up shooting street style in Shoreditch. Then, one of the guys there introduced me to someone who had set up a stress management app, so I`m doing stuff for her. He also introduced me to the people who were producing the films that I`ve been photographing last year. Almost all my work came from people I`ve worked before or met on jobs – it`s been referral after referral.

Wow, well obviously you do a good job! Are you even trying to find opportunities when there`s no connection there?

I do pursue non-referred work in the sense that I contact companies. However, I find that – unless you contact someone at the exact moment when they need somebody for a specific job – you never hear back from them. People forget. And when they need somebody, the photographer they remember is the most recent photographer they`ve met, not necessarily the best one.

paul fuller blog interview

“Photography gives me an excuse to go out and explore, talk to people, go to places and do stuff.”

We come across a makeshift sign stuck to a branch of a tree. Paul takes a picture of it…

This may be something for my Hackney book… I`ve been taking a lot of pictures of lost posters recently. It started with one of those `Lost-cat-posters` stuck to a tree. They`ve put it in a plastic sleeve but water got inside and the picture of the cat – the ink – had run down. So there was nothing but smudge and it said nothing but “Lost cat”. And I thought: “Yes, it`s even missing from the picture now”. That`s when I started taking pictures whenever I see a `Lost poster`. When they are out in the rain for a while, the pictures become really distorted.  And I began finding really random ones: on a shoot in Knightsbridge was a poster stuck on a wall of a very expensive hotel and it was a lost white parakeet.

So, you kind of encounter your projects and ideas more than chasing or trying to find them?

Yes, it was in Lockdown last summer when I started taking pictures of little strips of light on the wall. When you get that little bit of sun coming in through the blinds. And I`ve now got a folder which just says: “Lights in the house”. In the spirit of trying hard to have proper projects, whenever I start seeing something regularly and it becomes a bit of a thing in my head, then I start collecting pictures of it.

We walk past some trees that have been cracked by the wind…

Even though I walk past here almost every day, each time I see something new – even in the same spots. The light is always slightly different. And the light in spring this year will be different from the light last year because some trees will not be here anymore, so the light is getting where it didn`t get before – it`s always changing. I`m fascinated by the chaos – 100 years of twisted wood … Here: there are little plants growing out of the wood that are not part of the tree.  Every little patch is so unfathomably complex, there are millions of different living things. It would be an interesting project to just sit down in one spot for an hour and take pictures of stuff that`s around you. I could probably spend an hour photographing all these details.  

nature detail in the Hackney Marshes

Would you say nature is something that makes you want to take pictures or inspires you? What are the things that make you wanna go out and create?

If anything inspires me, I`m probably not aware of it. It`s more that I always see interesting stuff here. I`m quite fascinated by the stuff that`s under the water – when the water is really low you can see random stuff – there even is a car somewhere down here… And there`s a motorbike which was buried by the river. Someone dug it up. The number plate was still visible when I first saw it so I took a picture of it and checked its MOT history online: it was registered in 1977 and never had its first MOT. So, it must have been stolen when it was really new, and somebody dumped it by the river. And it had been buried ever since.

Wow that`s crazy! Are these sorts of discoveries the motivation why you picked up photography in the first place? What keeps you motivated?

Photography gives me an excuse to go out and explore, talk to people,  go to places, and do stuff. That is a very big driving force behind it all. For example the work for the street style website – I loved it. I sometimes ended up talking to people for an hour, I had some amazing conversations. One day, we had an intern come along to see how we did the street-style pictures. After the day she said, she will never walk around on this planet again with the same attitude towards other people – every person we stopped and talked to has been absolutely fascinating. I just like going out and meeting people. Having a camera in your hand and a reason to be there gives you motivation and a license to stick your nose into places where you wouldn`t otherwise do it.

What are your current goals or projects?

For our new online magazine, I have taken portraits of artists and I want to do more of that. I wonder why I haven`t done more of that before. I think, my main problem was the difficulty in approaching people – it`s super awkward to just approach people in the street saying “Can I take your picture?”. When I did it for the street style job, I had no problem with it at all, because it was my job – after all, I was taking pictures for a street style website. But if I was just doing it for me… So taking these portraits for this website is giving me a reason to message people and say “Hey we`re doing this arts and culture website can we take some pictures of you?”. And they usually say yes. Also, I hardly ever used to print anything. But ever since I started taking these portraits, I print loads of stuff – I need to see the images printed and hold them in my hand. So: more printing, more portraits.

Paul`s work can be found on his website www.paulfuller.co.uk, and also on Instagram @pf_photographer  . His Hackney images specifically are on @hackneycamera.

The arts and culture website can be found on www.mustaaard.com 

Fasziniert vom Chaos

Im Gespräch mit Paul Fuller

Paul Fuller ist Filmemacher und Fotograf für Mode, Musik, Reportage, Portrait und Fine Art. Seine Arbeiten sind voller Atmosphäre und Zauber. Für ein neuestes Projekt, eine Kunst- und Kultur- Webseite, portraitiert er Künstler, die er und seine Projektpartner aussuchen. Viele seiner Bilder sind ganz in der Nähe seines zu Hauses entstanden: in den Hackney Marshes, ein Grünstreifen entlang des Flusses River Lea in East London. Dort treffen wir uns auf einen Spaziergang.

Paul, deine Bilder sehen aus, als wären sie mit einer Filmkamera fotografiert worden. Sind sie das oder ist das ein Style, den du in der Nachbearbeitung anstrebst?

Manche sind Film, manche nicht. Ich habe Phasen. Und ich habe wie die meisten Fotografen viel zu viele Kameras – Film- und Digitalkameras. Aber ich versuche meine Bilder nicht unbedingt nach Film aussehen zu lassen. Ich versuche eher, sie nicht digital aussehen zu lassen. Digital ist zu clean, zu perfekt und es ist toll für manche. Aber ich mag es lieber unperfekt, weniger klar und mehr atmosphärisch. Allerdings ist es nicht so, dass ich als Film-Fotograf begonnen habe und dann diesen Look behalten wollte. Denn als ich angefangen habe, mich so richtig für Fotografie zu interessieren, gab es bereits Digitalkameras.

Auf deinem Portfolio auf deiner Webseite sind viele Bilder von persönlichen Projekten. Wie findest du und entscheidest du dich für die?

Auf meiner Webseite sind eigentlich fast gar keine bezahlten Sachen. Das meiste, was da zu sehen ist, habe ich just for fun gemacht. Zum Beispiel gehe ich zu vielen Gigs und Konzerten. Und wenn es eine Band gibt, die ich mag und die interessant aussieht, dann schreibe ich ihnen eine Nachricht ob sie mir einen Fotopass für ihren Gig schicken können – einfach weil ich sowas gern fotografiere. Wenn ich Laufen gehe, nehme ich immer meine Kamera mit und die meisten meiner Hackney Marshes Bilder sind entstanden, während ich laufen war. Allerdings würde ich mich nicht auf beispielsweise Musik oder Mode spezialisieren wollen. Ich mag es nicht, wenn sich die Dinge beginnen, ständig zu wiederholen, sondern ich fotografiere gern viele verschiedene Dinge.

Findest du, dass diese persönlichen Projekte auch für deine bezahlte Arbeit hilfreich sind?

Zum einen ist es natürlich Übung. Und wenn ich viel Videoarbeit mache, dann vermisse ich das Fotografieren und muss mir meine Kamera schnappen und etwas für mich selbst tun. Wenn du für dich selbst arbeitest, dann kannst du machen was du möchtest, während Auftraggeber in der Regel eine bestimmte Art von Bild von dir erwarten. Natürlich kann ich den Auftragsarbeiten meine eigene Note verpassen – schließlich ist ein Grund, warum ich für den Job beauftragt wurde, hoffentlich der, dass die Auftraggeber meine persönlichen Arbeiten auf meinem Portfolio gesehen und gemocht haben. Aber beispielsweise die Portraits, die ich für unser neues Projekt der Kunst- und Kultur-Webseite mache: da richte ich mich nicht nach irgendeiner Meinung außer dem, was ich selbst davon erwarte – und das ist super, wenn man das kann.

“Ich würde mich nicht auf beispielsweise Musik oder Mode spezialisieren wollen. Ich fotografiere gern viele verschiedene Dinge.”

paul fuller with camera in hackney marshes

Wie bist du klargekommen, als du als Freiberufler in London Fuß fassen wolltest, nachdem du deinen Job als Zeitungs-Art-Director verlassen hast?

Als ich als Freiberufler begonnen habe, hat mich eine ehemalige Kollegin einer ihrer Freunde empfohlen. Die hatte eine Firma gegründet hat und brauchte Videos für Tutorials. Schließlich habe ich all ihre Videos und einige Fotos gemacht. Diese Kunden haben mich dann wiederum an eine Streetstyle Webseite weiterempfohlen, so dass ich dann in Shoreditch Streetsyle fotografiert habe. Danach hat mich einer der Jungs dieser Webseite einer Unternehmerin vorgestellt, die eine Stressmanagement-App entworfen hat. Also fotografiere ich für sie. Zum anderen hat mich der Webseiten-Mitarbeiter den Leuten vorgestellt, die die Filme gemacht haben, die ich letztes Jahr fotografiert habe. Fast alle meiner Aufträge kommen von Leuten mit denen ich schon mal zusammengearbeitet habe oder die ich auf Jobs kennengelernt habe. Eine Empfehlung ist der Nächsten gefolgt.  

Wow, das spricht für deine Arbeit! Versuchst du manchmal an Jobs zu kommen, bei denen es keine Connections gibt?

Ja, ich kontaktiere immer wieder Firmen. Aber meiner Erfahrung nach melden die sich nicht zurück – außer du kontaktierst sie genau in dem Moment, in dem sie gerade jemanden für einen bestimmten Job brauchen. Leute vergessen. Und in dem Moment, in dem sie jemanden brauchen, erinnern sie sich an den letzten Fotografen, den sie getroffen haben, nicht unbedingt den Besten.

paul fuller hackney marshes

“Fotografie gibt mir eine Ausrede rauszugehen und Neues zu entdecken, Leute anzusprechen, Orte zu besuchen. “

Wir gehen an einem improvisierten Schild vorbei, das an einem Baum befestigt ist. Paul macht ein Bild davon….

Das könnte etwas für mein Hackney-Buch sein… Ich habe in letzter Zeit viele Bilder von „Vermisst-Postern“ gemacht. Es hat angefangen mit einem dieser “Katze vermisst“-Poster, das an einen Baum geheftet war. Es war in einer transparenten Hülle, aber Wasser ist in die Hülle gelaufen und das Bild der Katze, also die Tinte, war völlig verlaufen. Da war nur noch Geschmiere übrig und die Überschrift „Katze vermisst“. Ich dachte: „Ja, sie fehlt nun sogar auf dem Bild“. Von da an habe ich ein Foto gemacht wenn ich ein Vermisst-Poster gesehen habe. Wenn die für einige Zeit im Regen draußen hängen, dann werden die Bilder völlig verzerrt. Inzwischen habe ich alle Mögliche gefunden: Bei einem Shooting in Knightsbridge war ein Plakat an die Wand eines sehr teuren Hotels befestigt und vermisst wurde ein weißer Sittich.

Das heißt, du triffst eher zufällig auf deine Projekte und versuchst nicht unbedingt welche zu finden?

Ja, letzten Sommer im Lockdown habe ich damit begonnen Lichtstreifen im Haus zu fotografieren. Wenn zum Beispiel etwas Sonne durch die Jalousien kommt. Jetzt habe ich einen Ordner, der heißt “Licht im Haus”. Im Sinne des ernsthaften Versuchs, richtige Projekte zu haben, sammle ich Bilder immer dann, wenn ich etwas regelmäßig sehe und ich dann öfter darüber nachdenke.  

Wir kommen an Bäumen und Baumteilen vorbei, die vom Wind abgebrochen worden sind…

Obwohl ich hier fast jeden Tag vorbeikomme, sehe ich doch immer wieder etwas Neues – sogar an den gleichen Stellen. Das Licht ist immer etwas anders und das Licht in diesem Frühling wird anders sein als das im Frühling letzten Jahres. Denn manche Bäume werden nicht mehr hier sein und das Licht wird Stellen erreichen, an die es vorher nicht kam. Es ändert sich ständig. Das Chaos fasziniert mich – 100 Jahre altes verdrehtes und verwachsenes Holz… Und hier: da wachsen kleine Pflanzen aus dem Holz, die überhaupt nicht Teil des Baums sind. Jeder Fleck ist so unfassbar komplex. Da sind Millionen verschiedener lebendiger Wesen. Es wäre ein interessantes Projekt nur dazusitzen und eine Stunde lang Dinge zu fotografieren, die unmittelbar um einen herum sind. Ich könnte wahrscheinlich eine Stunde damit verbringen, einfach nur all diese Details zu fotografieren.

Würdest du sagen, dass Natur etwas ist, was dich zum Bildermachen anstiftet oder inspiriert? Was sind die Dinge, die deine Kreativität in Gang bringen?

Wenn mich etwas inspiriert, dann bin ich mir dessen wahrscheinlich nicht bewusst. Es ist eher so, dass ich hier immer interessante Sachen sehe. Ich bin ziemlich fasziniert von dem, was unter dem Wasser im Fluss ist – wenn das Wasser richtig tief steht sieht man da alles Mögliche – sogar ein Auto. Und am Ufer gibt es ein Motorrad, das mal neben dem Fluss vergraben war und das jemand ausgegraben hat. Das Nummernschild war noch zu sehen, als ich es zum ersten Mal gesehen habe. Ich habe ein Bild davon gemacht und nachgeforscht: Es wurde 1977 angemeldet und hatte nie seinen ersten TüV. Das heißt, jemand muss es gestohlen haben, als es noch ganz neu war, und dann versucht haben, es hier am Fluss loszuwerden – seitdem war es hier vergraben.  

Paul Fuller blog interview

Wow verrückt! Sind solche Entdeckungen deine Motivation, warum du überhaupt Fotograf geworden bist? Was motiviert dich?

Fotografie gibt mir eine Ausrede rauszugehen und Neues zu entdecken, Leute anzusprechen, Orte zu besuchen. Das ist ein großer Antrieb für mich. Zum Beispiel die Arbeit für die Streetstyle Webseite – ich hab`s geliebt. Manchmal hat ein Foto zu einer einstündigen Unterhaltung geführt und ich hatte unglaublich tolle Gespräche. Einmal haben wir eine Praktikantin mitgenommen, um ihr zu zeigen, wie wir bei den Street Style Fotos vorgehen. Am Ende des Tages sagte sie, sie wird nie wieder auf diesem Planeten umhergehen und andere Leute mit den gleichen Augen sehen wie vor diesem Tag. Jede Person, die wir für ein Foto angehalten haben, war absolut faszinierend. Ich mag es einfach, rauszugehen und Leute zu treffen. Eine Kamera in der Hand zu haben und damit einen Grund zu haben, an einem Ort zu sein, gibt dir Motivation und eine Lizenz deine Nase in Ecken zu stecken, in denen du sonst nichts verloren hättest.  

Und was sind deine aktuellen Projekte und Ziele?

Für unsere neue Kunst- und Kultur-Webseite habe ich Portraits von Künstlern fotografiert und davon will ich mehr machen. Ich frage mich, warum ich das nicht schon früher viel öfter gemacht habe. Vermutlich war mein Hauptproblem die Schwierigkeit, auf Leute zuzugehen. Ich meine, es ist super unangenehm, einfach so Leute auf der Straße anzusprechen und sie zu fragen, ob ich ein Foto von ihnen machen kann. Als ich das für den Street Style Job gemacht habe, hatte ich überhaupt kein Problem damit, denn es war ja mein Job. Aber wenn es nur für mich persönlich wäre… Die Webseite gibt mir einen Grund, Leute anzuschreiben und zu sagen „Hey, wir machen diese Kunst und Kultur Webseite, können wir dafür ein paar Bilder von dir machen?“ und die allermeisten sagen ja. Außerdem habe ich selten mal was ausgedruckt, aber seit ich diese Portraits mache, drucke ich ganz viel – ich muss die Bilder als Druck sehen und in meinen Händen halten. Also: mehr Drucke und mehr Portraits. 

Paul`s Arbeiten sind auf seiner Webseite www.paulfuller.co.uk zu finden und außerdem auf Instagram @pf_photographer. Speziell seine Hackney-Bilder stellt er auf seinen Insta-Account @hackneycamera.

Seine Kunst- und Kulturwebseite findest du auf www.mustaaard.com

Not for everyone

abstract of two cars by Nadine Wilmanns

If you can`t find the comment section at the end of the post, click on the heading and check again. ^

Wenn du das Kommentar-Feld am Ende des Posts nicht siehst, klicke auf die Überschrift. ^

Not for everyone

As creatives, as well as human beings, it`s so important to understand – and accept – that our work is not for everyone. That`s in fact not just the case with art but with almost all things. Cars for example: Not everyone would love a classic car. Some wouldn`t want any other.

It is impossible to please everyone, but it is possible – and much more effective – to please someone or a few people. I`ve been listening to Seth Godin lately and he says: “It is impossible to create work that both matters and pleases everyone.” And: “Don`t be a purple drop in the ocean but be a purple drop in a swimming pool. Walk away from the ocean and look for a swimming pool.”

If we want to create work that truly matters to SOME, then we need to stop trying to dilute it, so that EVERYONE can be happy with it. We need the confidence and the courage to tell those people who don`t like it: Sorry, but this is not for you. If we want to create authentic and strong work, it can`t be for everyone and that`s ok.

"You are your most important audience"

This doesn`t mean that we shouldn`t learn and improve and progress. But, while I want to stay open to constructive critique, I as well want to stay true to myself. Photographer David duChemin writes in his book ‘The heart of photography’: “You are your first and most important audience.”

There will always be stuff that can be improved, and we`re just human. But while we keep making progress and working on our art, we shouldn`t run after compliments or try to please everyone. We need to be able to distinguish: Does the person, who doesn`t like my work has a point and is there an opportunity for me to learn? Or is my work just not for him?” Both are just fine.

Nicht für jeden

As Kreative und als Mensch ist es wichtig zu verstehen und ok damit zu sein, dass unsere Arbeit nicht für jeden ist. Das gilt ja für fast alles, nicht nur für Kunst. Autos zum Beispiel: Nicht jeder will unbedingt einen Oldtimer. Aber für manche gibt es kein besseres Auto.

Es ist unmöglich, jedem zu gefallen, aber es ist möglich – und viel effektiver – jemanden oder ein paar Leute anzusprechen. Ich habe in letzter Zeit viel vom Marketing-Experten Seth Godin gehört und er sagt: „Es ist unmöglich Arbeiten zu produzieren, die gleichzeitig einen Unterschied machen und jedem gefallen.“ Und: „Sei kein lila Tropfen im Ozean, sondern sei ein lila Tropfen in einem Swimming Pool. Wende dich vom Ozean ab und schau nach einem Swimmingpool.“

Wenn wir Arbeit schaffen wollen, die MANCHEN Leuten wirklich etwas bedeutet, dann müssen wir aufhören sie zu verwässern, damit sie JEDERMANNS Sache wird.  Wir brauchen den Mut und das Vertrauen, den Leuten, die sie nicht mögen, zu sagen: Sorry, das ist nicht für dich. Wenn wir authentische und starke Arbeiten machen wollen, kann das nicht für jeden sein und das ist ok.

"Du bist dein wichtigstes Publikum"

Das bedeutet nicht, dass wir nicht lernen, besser werden und vorankommen sollen. Aber während ich offen für konstruktive Kritik sein möchte, will ich auch mir selbst treu bleiben. Fotograf David duChemin schreibt in seinem Buch ,Das Herz der Fotografie‘: „Du bist dein erstes und wichtigstes Publikum.“

Es wird immer Dinge geben, die wir verbessern können und wir sind nur Menschen. Aber während wir an uns und unserer Kunst arbeiten, sollten wir nicht Komplimenten hinterherrennen oder versuchen, jedem zu gefallen. Wir müssen unterscheiden können: Ist an dem, was die Person, die meine Arbeit nicht mag, was dran – ist das also eine Möglichkeit für mich was zu lernen? Oder ist meine Arbeit einfach nicht für ihn?“ Beides ist ok.

New Year

New Year lights celebration

New Year

As we enter the new year, it`s a good time to go through all our photos of this year. Of course, to reflect on the past twelve months. But as well to see how we grew as artists and to motivate us to keep on pushing forward and to become better in the new year ahead.

(On a side note: In my case, the new year is a good opportunity to organize my picture chaos, too. Click here for an article about a good organizational structure. I`ve started some organizing by the beginning of the lockdown in March but didn`t finish. Once I`ve established a consistent system that works for me, I`ll share it here.)

It`s not about pretty

Lately, I`ve had some days when I felt a little discouraged in documenting the ordinary. Because you know on Instagram you see all these super-pretty rooms and stuff and well, I don`t find my place so picture-pretty. However, looking back at the 2020 photographs, I realized that it weren`t the “pretty things” that made the best photos. But it was good light. Plus, ideally some meaning, and a very present moment that stayed.

That really motivated me again to shoot daily what is meaningful to me and focus on the light (in the truest sense of the word). Let´s feel and observe the very moment as often as possible without thinking about later or before. I`ve read and noticed that this can make an ordinary moment more meaningful.

As well I can report that it`s often just about getting started in order to get us into a habit. Like in this case the habit of documenting our lives in pictures. For example, we can begin with taking a picture of something simple as our feet and that can get us going to “see” and become aware of more.

For the year to come, I hope that I can always be thankful, curious, and unbiased. That I will be open to new experiences and surprises. And that I have faith in God`s support in order to be brave and to take healthy chances to document more. What are your wishes? Have a good start in 2021 and don`t let yourself get disheartened if the start doesn`t turn out as hoped. 

Neues Jahr

Der Start ins neue Jahr ist eine gute Zeit, um durch die Fotos von 2020 zu blättern. Natürlich um nochmal auf das Jahr zurückzuschauen. Aber auch um zu sehen, wie wir als Künstler gewachsen sind und um uns zu motivieren, weiter an uns zu arbeiten, um noch besser zu werden.

(Übrigens ist es für mich auch eine gute Gelegenheit, Ordnung mein Bilder-Chaos zu bringen. Ich habe beim ersten Lockdown im März damit begonnen, aber bin null fertig geworden. Sobald ich ein funktionierendes System entwickelt habe, werde ich es hier teilen.)

Es geht nicht um hübsch

In letzter Zeit hatte ich immer wieder Tage, an denen ich mich ein bisschen entmutigt darin gefühlt habe, das Alltägliche zu dokumentieren. Auf Instagram sieht man doch immer diese superhübschen Räume und Orte – und naja, ich finde, bei mir sieht`s nicht so „bildhübsch“ aus. Aber als ich durch meine Fotos von 2020 geschaut habe, ist mir aufgefallen: Es waren nicht die „hübschen Dinge“, die die besten Bilder ausgemacht haben. Sondern es war gutes Licht. Und idealerweise eine Bedeutung und ein „erlebter“ Moment, der mir im Gefühl geblieben ist.

Das hat mich wieder motiviert, jeden Tag zu fotografieren was Bedeutung für mich hat, und auf das Licht zu fokussieren (im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes). Ich habe gelesen und bemerkt, dass ein gewöhnlicher Moment mehr Bedeutung bekommt, wenn wir ihn richtig „fühlen“ und beobachten, ohne an vorher oder nachher zu denken.

Beginne einfach

Außerdem kann ich berichten, dass es oft einfach nur darum geht, zu beginnen, um etwas zur Gewohnheit zu machen. Wie eben die Gewohnheit, unseren Alltag in Bildern zu dokumentieren. Zum Beispiel könnten wir damit starten, einfach etwas Simples wie unsere Füße zu fotografieren. Das kann uns dann dazu verleiten, mehr zu sehen und wahrzunehmen.

Für das neue Jahr hoffe ich, dass ich dankbar, neugierig und unvoreingenommen sein kann. Dass ich offen sein werde für neue Erlebnisse und Überraschungen. Und dass ich daran glauben kann, dass Gott mich unterstützt, um dann mutiger zu sein, damit ich mehr dokumentieren kann. Was sind deine Wünsche? Hab einen guten Start in 2021 und lass dich nicht entmutigen, falls der Start nicht so läuft, wie erhofft.

In your style

in your style light on coffee shop chairs light photography

In your style

There is so much to say about having a personal style as a photographer and I`m not even entirely sure if I have a very distinctive one yet. However, there is something that I heard today, which relates to the style thing. And I really want to keep this in my head and my heart:

It`s something that actor Bryan Cranson said about auditions. And that basically goes for every job interview in the creative industry:

“You’re not going there to get a job.  You’re going there to present what you do. There it is – and walk away… And there is power in that.  There’s confidence in that, and it’s also saying ‘I can only do so much’…”

I think this could be a key to actually like what I HAVE to do because it`s a job: Not trying to be like some other photographer in order to please people’s expectations. But having a mindset of faith and doing and presenting what is true to myself. And accept that some might not like it and maybe hire someone else. It`s better for me not to have the job if otherwise, I would lose the love and the drive for what I`m doing.

...a job that I enjoy

Much easier said than done though as it takes some courage and confidence. But really, everyone`s taste is different anyway and so is everyone’s vision. Having faith, deciding to act on it, and sticking to this decision might be what makes all the difference between a job and a job that I enjoy.

More about personal style is in the video “Finding your Style” by John Keatley on lynda.com -unfortunately it`s members only.

In deinem Stil

Es gibt so viel darüber zu sagen, als Fotograf einen persönlichen Stil zu haben – und ich bin mir noch nicht mal sicher, ob ich einen sehr ausgeprägten Stil habe. Aber heute habe ich etwas gehört, das mit der Stil-Sache zu tun hat, und das wirklich in meinem Kopf und in meinem Herzen verankern möchte:

Es ist etwas, das der Schauspieler Bryan Cranson über das Vorsprechen bei Auditions gesagt hat. Das gilt eigentlich in jedem Vorstellungsgespräch für einen kreativen Job:

„Du gehst da nicht hin, um den Job zu bekommen. Du gehst hin, um deine Arbeit zu präsentieren. Hier ist sie – und du gehst wieder… Und darin ist Stärke. Darin ist Selbstvertrauen und es sagt auch ,Ich kann nur so viel machen‘…“

Das könnte ein Schlüssel sein, um wirklich zu mögen was ich tun MUSS, weil es ein Job ist. Nicht versuchen, so zu sein, wie ein anderer Fotograf, um irgendwelchen Erwartungen gerecht zu werden. Sondern eine Haltung des Glaubens und des Vertrauens haben. Das tun und zeigen, was mir und meinem Stil entspricht. Und akzeptieren, dass es einige nicht mögen werden und vielleicht jemand anderen engagieren werden. Es ist besser für mich, den Job nicht zu haben, wenn ich sonst die Liebe und die Motivation für das was ich tue verlieren würde.

...einen Job, den ich mag

Das ist natürlich viel leichter gesagt als getan, weil man Mut und Selbstvertrauen dafür braucht. Aber mal ehrlich, es hat sowieso jeder einen anderen Geschmack und genauso hat auch jeder einen anderen Blick. Glauben und Vertrauen zu haben, mich dazu zu entscheiden entsprechend zu handeln und mich an diesen Entschluss zu halten, könnte den Unterschied machen zwischen einem Job und einem Job den ich mag.

Mehr zum persönlichen Stil gibt es im Video “Finding your Style” von John Keatley auf lynda.com – da muss man nur leider Mitglied sein. 

error: Content is protected